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Comments

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L.A. TV Stations Free Up Some Spectrum For Wireless Broadband

mmell Re:Modern UHF vs. classical UHF (80 comments)

You're right, I misread the spec. However, they're still tending to favor those areas of bandwidth that are notably less efficient. While I don't have evidence to support this contention, I perceive that it is an intentional act designed to minimize OTA access to broadcast television, a cynical act designed to encourage or even force viewers to subscribe to cable or satellite services.

about two weeks ago
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L.A. TV Stations Free Up Some Spectrum For Wireless Broadband

mmell Re:Seconded! (80 comments)

At the end of the day, all I know is that stations which once were viewable (some even perfect) under analog are no longer viewable under digital. Wrap all the sophistry you want around your arguments - viewable beats not viewable any day, and I've discovered that many previously viewable channels are no longer available to me as OTA. I need to pay for 'em now via the cable and satellite companies. I can't just hand a rabbit ears on the back of my set or go up on my roof and mount a VHF/UHF antenna.

about two weeks ago
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L.A. TV Stations Free Up Some Spectrum For Wireless Broadband

mmell They also use considerably higher frequencies. (80 comments)

VHF frequencies tended to flow around obstructions. UHF frequencies tended to be more "line of sight". Modern digital television is on even higher frequencies. Crunch the numbers - this means less coverage by FREE broadcast mechanisms and more incentive for consumers to pay for cable or satellite reception. "Broadcast" companies get a reliable revenue stream, cable and satellite companies get a de facto monopoly and the government gets another choke point on communication. Everyone wins!

Well, everyone except Joe Sixpack; but he's just an ignorant dolt anyhow (an insensitive clod?).

about two weeks ago
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UK Ham Radio Reg Plans To Drop 15 min Callsign Interval and Allow Encryption

mmell Re:Special pleading (104 comments)

I'll go along with you this far - when a licensed broadcaster has their signal's integrity compromised by an individual broadcaster that's a violation of law. I agree completely with the concept of allocating bandwidth to commercial entities with the attendant regulation concerning what they're allowed to say and how.

Now, when I'm told that I may not use any bandwidth until I pay and submit to those same rules, that's censorship. Your "think of the children" argument doesn't hold water. They may have removed the knobs from my television, but there's still a button on the damned thing - unless it's 1984 and nobody told me.

about two weeks ago
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L.A. TV Stations Free Up Some Spectrum For Wireless Broadband

mmell Not in my personal experience. (80 comments)

Stations which I used to consider viewable (even some which came in at 0 - -10dB of gain, which is perfect for analog) have disappeared outright, or become modern examples of "flickervision" under digital. Don't fool yourself - the broadcast networks would love to see everyone get their signals from cable or via an encrypted stream from satellite. Instead of the fluctuating income stream bounded by ratings and advertiser whims, they can rely on CableCo for a guaranteed, predictable, reliable revenue stream.

about two weeks ago
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UK Ham Radio Reg Plans To Drop 15 min Callsign Interval and Allow Encryption

mmell Re:Special pleading (104 comments)

You need to find a better adult bookstore. Any depiction which includes penetration is generally considered hardcore porn. Hell, I know a lot of people who consider Game of Thrones to be hardcore porn.

about two weeks ago
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L.A. TV Stations Free Up Some Spectrum For Wireless Broadband

mmell Seconded! (80 comments)

Analog gets a little twitchy, you see snow (or ghosts). Sound has a little static to it. Your brain actually does a fantastic job of filtering these things out (like most people, you see and hear exactly what you want to see and hear).

Digital gets a little twitchy, you see a still frame (or nothing). Sound becomes silent. It's hard for your brain to actually filter out a blank screen and no audio.

about two weeks ago
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Turning the Tables On "Phone Tech Support" Scammers

mmell Re:External IP (210 comments)

You're already running Windows. How much worse can it get?

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Killing Off Windows Phone Brand Name In Favor of Just Windows

mmell It proves what most /.'ers have known all along... (352 comments)

MicroSoft is a marketing company, not a software company. Software just happens to be what they sell - they're in it for the brand.

about two weeks ago
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MetaFilter Founder Says Vacation Firm Forged Court Docs To Scotch Review

mmell Re: Do not ever (116 comments)

I still like the thought of thrashing dufus severely about the head and shoulders.

about three weeks ago
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MetaFilter Founder Says Vacation Firm Forged Court Docs To Scotch Review

mmell Re:scotch? (116 comments)

Archaic slang. Scotch, circular-file, 86, nix (as opposed to nichts) . . . pick one you like. I've got more.

about three weeks ago
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MetaFilter Founder Says Vacation Firm Forged Court Docs To Scotch Review

mmell Re:Do not ever (116 comments)

Gee, you've missed the opportunity to consider it assault (which doesn't require physical contact, incidentally). I wonder how that dude would take to a mouth full of bloody Chicklets?

about three weeks ago
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Welcome To Laniakea, Our New Cosmic Home

mmell It seems to make sense to me . . . (67 comments)

. . . the further we're able to look, the larger the structures we'll be able to perceive.

about three weeks ago
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RAYA: Real-time Audio Engine Simulation In Quake

mmell Lots of people here are missing the point. (89 comments)

Never mind making Quake/QuakeII/Quakex give audio cues that match the environment more precisely. When do I get a holosuite? I'd very much like the sound to match the image there, especially for some of the more, er, interesting holosuite programs.

about three weeks ago
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13-Year-Old Finds Fungus Deadly To AIDS Patients Growing On Trees

mmell It's a right-wing government conspiracy! (134 comments)

1) Create a disease which targets gays, blacks and IV drug users. Check.

2) Disseminate a fungus which grows on trees so we can target those left-wing tree-huggers. Check.

3) ???

4) Profit!!!

Damnit - I forgot the part where we nuke the whales. Oh, well - nothing's perfect.

about a month ago
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The Star That Exploded At the Dawn of Time

mmell Re:Block Holes? (55 comments)

No, a lot of them just end up on the talk show circuit.

about a month ago
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The Star That Exploded At the Dawn of Time

mmell Re:I got you one better, Mr. Fancy Pants Ancient S (55 comments)

Not quite. If yon atom is heavier than lithium, it's a fair bet it wasn't created until well after the big bang.

Now, the quarks making up those newfangled heavy atoms - those have been around since the beginning.

about a month ago
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The Star That Exploded At the Dawn of Time

mmell Re:Why can't hydrogen cool? (55 comments)

Technically - the local temperature drops, the Universe has as much "heat" now as it had in the instant after the big bang. A lot of that energy is presumably tied up in the quantum foam, but none of that heat has left the Universe - unless the Universe has sprung a leak.

about a month ago
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The Star That Exploded At the Dawn of Time

mmell Re:Why can't hydrogen cool? (55 comments)

Congratulations on demonstrating an understanding of the first law of thermodynamics.

about a month ago

Submissions

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RIP: ISP's driving the final stake into the internet.

mmell mmell writes  |  about 5 months ago

mmell (832646) writes "I'm sure a lot of Slashdot readers have strong opinions regarding Net Neutrality. I'm also sure that a percentage of Slashdot readers are also aware of DemandProgress.net, an organization which purports to act as a watchdog over certain government actions. Today, their pitch appears to be BREAKING: The End of Net Neutrality.

The website appears to be down. While we've been enjoying VisageTome, AgriVillage, Confection Smash Epic and various other pap streams, it would appear that the vague and undefined "Powers That Be" have quietly retaken their control over the Internetwork of computers we've come to know and love. How widespread is the damage, and is there any chance of repairing it before it's too late?"
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Is Slashdot staying relevant to Nerds that Matter with stuff that's news?

mmell mmell writes  |  about 8 months ago

mmell (832646) writes "Recently, Slashdot unveiled a new look and not unlike virtually every update the people running /. attempt, this proposed, beta change has caused widespread panic and hysteria such as not been seen since the broadcast of H. G. Wells' War of the Worlds. At what point do users of a free service gain a right to destroy that service (evidence of which is clearly visible throughout the site and requires no citation)? Has the average /. user devolved to the level of all the non-slashdotters we used to make fun of?"

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