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Robot Overlord Watch: Robots Join the Final Assembly Line at U.S. Auto Plant

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  1 year,13 days

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "MIT Technology Review has a story about BMW's new collaborative final-assembly-line robots. The move could prove a significant in the ongoing automation of work, as robots have previously been incapable of doing such jobs, and too dangerous to work in close proximity to humans. Robots like the ones at BMW’s South Carolina plant are also to cooperate with human workers, by handing them a wrench when they need it. So perhaps the next big shift in labor could be robot-human collaboration."
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How MOOCs Could Watch Students' Faces for Signs Of Confusion Or Frustration

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about a year ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "Tech Review has a story on research showing that facial recognition software can accurately spot signs that programming students are struggling. NC State researchers tracked students learning java and used an open source facial-expression recognition engine to identify emotions such as frustration or confusion. The technique could be especially useful for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)--where many thousands of students are working remotely--but it could also help teachers identify students who need help in an ordinary classroom, experts say. That is, as long as those students don't object to being watched constantly by a camera."
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Why Self-Driving Cars Are Still a Long Way Down the Road

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "Technology Review has a piece on the reality behind all the hype surrounding self-driving, or driverless, cars. From the article: "Vehicle automation is being developed at a blistering pace, and it should make driving safer, more fuel-efficient, and less tiring. But despite such progress and the attention surrounding Google’s “self-driving” cars, full autonomy remains a distant destination. A truly autonomous car, one capable of dealing with any real-world situation, would require much smarter artificial intelligence than Google or anyone else has developed. The problem is that until the moment our cars can completely take over, we will need automotive technologies to strike a tricky balance: they will have to extend our abilities without doing too much for the driver.""
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A German Parking Garage Parks Your Car for You

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "Tech Review has a story about a garage in Ingolstadt, Germany, where the cars park themselves. The garage is an experiment set up by Audi to explore ways that autonomous technology might practically be introduced; most of the sensor technology is built into the garage and relayed to the cars rather than inside the cars themselves. It seems that carmakers see the technology progressing in a slightly different way to Google, with its fleet of self-driving Prius. From the piece: “It’s actually going to take a while before you get a really, fully autonomous car,” says Annie Lien, a senior engineer at the Electronics Research Lab, a shared facility for Audi, Volkswagen, and other Volkswagen Group brands in Belmont, California, near Silicon Valley. “People are surprised when I tell them that you’re not going to get a car that drives you from A to B, or door to door, in the next 10 years.”"
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Bruce Schneier: A Cyber Cold War" Could Destabilize the Internet

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "In an op-ed piece over at Technology Review, Bruce Schneier says that the cyber espionage between the US, China, and other nations, has been rampant for the past decade. But he also worries that the media frenzy over recent attacks is fostering a new kind of Internet-nationalism and spurring a cyber arms race that has plenty of negative side-effects for the Internet and it's users. From the piece: "We don’t know the capabilities of the other side, and we fear that they are more capable than we are. So we spend more, just in case. The other side, of course, does the same. That spending will result in more cyber weapons for attack and more cyber-surveillance for defense. It will result in move government control over the protocols of the Internet, and less free-market innovation over the same. At its worst, we might be about to enter an information-age Cold War: one with more than two “superpowers.” Aside from this being a bad future for the Internet, this is inherently destabilizing.""
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Ubuntu for Smartphones Will Be Released in a Few Weeks

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "Canonical says it will release a version of its OS for smartphones, along with a tool for installing it on Galaxy Nexus handsets in the next few weeks. Pat McGowan, director of engineering at Canonical, demonstrated the software at MIT last week, and said that carriers and hardware makers have shown a “very strong, good reaction” because they are so concerned about the amount of power Google has in mobile computing."
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Why Ray Kurzweil's Google Project May be Doomed to Fail

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "An AI researcher at MIT suggests that Ray Kurzweil's ambitious plan to build a super-smart personal assistant at Google may be fundamentally flawed. Kurzweil's idea, as put forward in his book How to Build a Mind, is to combine a simple model of the brain with enormous computing power and vast amounts of data, to construct a much more sophisticated AI. Boris Katz, who works oh machines designed to understand language, says this misses a key facet of human intelligence: that it is built on a lifetime of experiencing the world rather than simply processing raw information."
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Advertising May Soon Follow You from One Device to the Next

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about 2 years ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "We're all familiar with ads that seem to follow you around as you go from one website to another. A startup called Drawbridge has developed technology that could let those ads follow you even when you pic up a smartphone or tablet. The company, founded by an ex-Google scientist employs statistical methods to try and match identify users on different devices. The idea is that this will preserve privacy while making mobile ads more lucrative, although some experts aren't convinced that the data will be truly anonymous."
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Give Your Computer Interface the Finger, Literally

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about 2 years ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "Tech Review has a story about a startup that's developed software capable of tracking not just hand movements but precise finger gestures. The setupm from 3Gear, requires two depth-sensing cameras (aka Kinects) at the top corners of your display. Then simply give your computer thumbs up — or whatever other gesture you might feel like — and it'll know what you're doing. The software is available for free while the product is in beta testing, if you want to give it a try. The story also includes a cool video."
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A Robot that Could Revolutionize U.S. Manufacturing.

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about 2 years ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "Technology Review has the scoop on a revolutionary new industrial robot created by famed robotics researcher Rodney Brooks. The robot, Baxter, is completely safe, extremely adaptable, and ridiculously easy to program. By providing a way to automate simple manufacturing work, it could help make U.S. manufacturers compete with Chinese companies that rely on low-cost human labor. You can see the new robot in action in a related video of the robot in action and Brooks discussing its potential."
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What Features Would the Next Truly Innovative Smartphone Have?

moon_unit2 moon_unit2 writes  |  about 2 years ago

moon_unit2 (2573409) writes "Tech Review has a blog post suggesting some still-at-the-research-stage innovations Apple might put into the future iPhones. These include solid-state batteries, cloud-processing and a predictive version of Siri. But, of course, any of these ideas might just as easily be taken up by another smartphone manufacturer. Whatever the case, as the competition heats up it could certainly be a good time to be a smartphone consumer."
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