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Comments

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Climate Change Skeptic Group Must Pay Damages To UVA, Michael Mann

mschuyler Move along. Nothing to see here (497 comments)

So it's perfectly OK to "hide the decline." After all, it doesn't really matter if tree ring data shows a decline in temperature in modern times when the temperature is obviously rising as shown by accurate thermometers. We'll just use the tree ring data as a proxy for past temperatures anyway. And when we discover the "anomaly" we'll just neglect to extend that graph line because it would be awkward to explain just why that green line is headed down, down, down while everything else is headed up.

After all, we're only coming off the "Little Ice Age" and are in an inter-glacial period. We can explain the "Medieval Warming Period" and the "Roman Warming Period" They're just "local variations," you know.

And so what if Al Gore got his CO2 readings and his temperature readings backwards, thus claiming CO2 caused temperature rises when the rises came first? It makes a very scary looking graph.

And what about the ice core samples from Greenland that show the "Hockey Stick" is such a minor glitch it can't be seen? Don't worry. We can change the scale to make it look bad and besides, no matter what input we use, as long as it's "red noise" (like stock prices) we get a hockey stick anyway! So no matter what we do, we can show how alarming it is!

Oh, and did we put some of our temperature gauges in asphalt parking lots in the south? Don't worry, we've "adjusted" those readings artificially.

After all, we're SCIENTISTS and we can explain everything. Move along. There's nothing to see here.

Chemtrails are real, too....

about a month and a half ago
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Future of Cars: Hydrogen Fuel Cells, Or Electric?

mschuyler Re:setting the world on fire (659 comments)

How many gasoline cars catch on fire every year? Thousands.

How many Teslas have caught on fire ever? Two

Conclusion: Teslas catch on fire.

about 3 months ago
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Did the Ignition Key Just Die?

mschuyler So 19th century (865 comments)

Using a key is so 19th century. Pushing a button? 20th century. Embedded RFID is where it's at. Get in the car; it turns on. End of story.

about 4 months ago
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

mschuyler Re:4 million people disagree (336 comments)

4 million people was the figure quoted. 4 million people "disagreed." I assumed that was the population of Detroit. Obviously that was wrong, It's the "Metro area of Detroit" that is 4 million, so you get off on a technicality, but it does NOT CHANGE THE FACT that Detroit's murder rate of 48 per 100,000 is FAR higher than more civilized parts of the country, including San Jose at 4.1 per 100,000.

Add to that the fact that the city is bankrupt through decades of mismanagement, it's houses are being bulldozed. The only thing that keeps the city going is gambling. It's police force is brutal, as is its extremes of climate. And its economy sucks.

Other than that, I'm sure it's a great place to live. Pardon if the rest of the country doesn't flock to live there, Meanwhile the city proper (since you insist on those numbers) has witnessed a decline in population from over a million in 1990 to 713,000 today. In other words, people are leaving as fast as they can.

about 4 months ago
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

mschuyler Re:4 million people disagree (336 comments)

Of course you have to make it through the day without getting murdered. Detroit is exceeded only by New Orleans for murder capital of America (48 per 100,000 in 2011). Compare Silicon Valley (San Jose) at 4.6 per 100,000 in 2012. So by this time next year a couple thousand of those 4 million will be dead.

There's a lot more to avoid in Detroit than the snow. I guess that makes me a wuss.

about 4 months ago
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

mschuyler Re:FLYOVER (336 comments)

Homeowners' Associations are like little Nazi dictatorships enforcing a bland conformity on everyone. "Think of my neighbors"? How about they worry about their own shit instead of the color of my deck railing?

about 4 months ago
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I expect to retire ...

mschuyler Re:Frist pots (341 comments)

It is by design. The "original" retirement age of 65 was set there because that was the average life expectancy. The idea was that if you managed to beat the odds, then a small pension would pay for your food and incidentals while your family was expected to provide the rest until you managed to do the right thing and kick off.

Today, of course, "retirement" has become an entitlement and you expect the government to keep you in the style you have grown to expect with a sufficient pension to maintain your independence.

about 4 months ago
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Can You Buy a License To Speed In California?

mschuyler Re:Frames are for losers (325 comments)

But it was legal because his cars were never more than 6 months old.

about 5 months ago
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A Bid To Take 3D Printing Mainstream

mschuyler How many people create the words they print? (143 comments)

The idea that 3D printing won't take off because people are not well-versed in designing their own 3D products with expensive CAD software is like saying printers won't take off because people aren't really good writers and can't afford a word processor. How many people use their printers for printing off their own words from a word processor? How many people use their printers for printing off PDF files, manuals, brochures, etc. from the Net?

Why won't 3D printers take off again?

about 5 months ago
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A Bid To Take 3D Printing Mainstream

mschuyler Re:clunky software? (143 comments)

Computers will never be all that affordable. Mass production is too much cheaper than one-off designs. Computers will continue to be for big business and hobbyists, not mainstream.

about 5 months ago
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A Bid To Take 3D Printing Mainstream

mschuyler Re:clunky software? (143 comments)

Only if the store has it in stock. And why do I need them as an intermediary anyway? Point, click, file, print is a lot easier than driving to the mall only to find out they don't have it.

about 5 months ago
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Big Data Breaches Give Credit Monitoring Services a Boost

mschuyler IF they work......Lifelock sucks (48 comments)

I had Lifelock when the Stratfor hack went down. Stratfor told us all Christmas Eve IIRC though the hack happened in early December. I and thousands of others verified our cards were in the wild, took action, cancelled cards, etc. Finally, in mid-January, Lifelock informed me that my card had been compromised with a single e-mail, long after I already had my new card.

Totally useless.

about 5 months ago
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Malaysian Flight Disappearance 'Deliberate'

mschuyler Re:does it add up? (436 comments)

WHY do you have to climb to 45,000 feet to depressurize the cabin? a normal Flight Level of 35,000 feet doesn't have enough oxygen either. There's no need to climb if that's what you intend to do.

Climbing costs fuel. Descending to 20,000 some odd feet ALSO requires fuel because it costs more fuel to fly at lower elevations. And tHAT lessens the range.

about 5 months ago
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Engine Data Reveals That Flight 370 Flew On For Hours After It "Disappeared"

mschuyler Re:Combined with the ringing phones ? (382 comments)

The phones weren't "ringing." the ring tone the relatives heard was supplied by Central Office Equipment to give the illusion that the phones were "ringing." That's what happens when someone picks up the phone and you say, "But it hadn't started ringing yet." Yes, it had. It's just that your simulation-ring hadn't reached you yet--two different tones. Think about it. There is only a single cable pair that hooks up a typical phone. How could you possibly "hear it ring"?

The cell network mimics the POTS network. It's just part of the "aural interface" phones have used for over a hundred years.

about 5 months ago
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The Next Keurig Will Make Your Coffee With a Dash of "DRM"

mschuyler Re:Why? (769 comments)

I did, too, for years. I used a single-cup cone and filter with freshly ground beans. There's really not much difference, and the Keurig approach is a whole lot cleaner.

COST: About the same per cup. Unless you buy from the local market for $1.00 a cup, you ought to be able to get the K-cups for about 35 cents or so apiece. Compare this to buying a pound of coffee at fair trade prices (about $13.00 per pound where I am) and for a single cup a day you go through about that much. You're going to pay some serious money for a good grinder (not those horrid centrifugal force pieces of crap that break every year) the same as you'll pay for a Keurig machine. So on a cost per cup basis if you're a single-cup-person, it's about the same cost to run either way.

QUALITY: If you're getting "watery goop" (as one said here) change your brand. K-Cups can brew excellent quality coffee--or not--your choice. Shop around and go for "bold" brands and you ought to do fine.

CLEANLINESS: Keurig hands-down. No muss, no fuss. No time needed. Spill a cone full of hot coffee and you've got yourself a disaster. Been there; done that more than once. Unless you have hard water, Keurig runs clean.

I've had my Keurig for two years or so after having done the cone atop the cup trip for several decades. I spend no more on coffee than I used to. For those of you who brew pots and drink lots, a Keurig makes no sense and is way too expensive. But if you are content with a wake-me-up cup most days, a Keurig makes a lot of sense and is cost-equivalent to other ways of brewing.

about 6 months ago
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The Next Keurig Will Make Your Coffee With a Dash of "DRM"

mschuyler Re:Why? (769 comments)

Ha ha ha. Delusional. I have a very nice heirloom quality "conical burr grinder" and you WILL clean it every six months or so. Hopefully you'll be outside because the mess that rests in there is going to get everywhere.

about 6 months ago
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Best Valentine's Day gift (as recipient):

mschuyler Re:Really? Where's Sex on the list? (197 comments)

With a third of the people answering that Valentines has no meaning for them, my guess is that you are correct: They don't.

about 6 months ago
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U.S. Teenagers Are Driving Much Less: 4 Theories About Why

mschuyler Re:Murica Fuck yea! (635 comments)

You are correct, of course, but you don't understand the effect of size. my state is bigger than England, Scotland, and Wales combined--with 10% of the population. And that's just one state. I can travel 400 miles inside my state from one city to another and I'm still in the same state. When I travel 400 miles in Europe, I'm in a different country with a different language.

The distance from London to Paris is a bit over 200 miles. Going from San Francisco to New York City is about 2500 miles. The scale is enormously different and comparisons that sound so cool in writing are in practical terms irrelevant.

Public transportation is great when you're not going all that far anyway. It's great that you can commute from Bath to London by train. That will get you from one end of Los Angeles County to the other. I'm not saying bigger is better here. It's a problem, and so are the comparisons.

about 7 months ago

Submissions

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iPolice raid blogger

mschuyler mschuyler writes  |  more than 4 years ago

mschuyler (197441) writes "From http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2011818180_btipolice10.html

"When a top-secret prototype of Apple's new iPhone went missing recently, the computer giant summoned Silicon Valley's version of the cavalry â" an elite squad whose main mission is investigating crimes against high-tech companies.

Little-known outside the tech world, the unit suddenly entered the spotlight with its April 23 raid on the San Francisco Bay Area home of Jason Chen, the 29-year-old technology blogger who had gained possession of the phone.

The unit swept in after Chen posted a photo and details of the new iPhone on the Gizmodo.com website. But the raid itself became secondary to a larger discussion in Silicon Valley and the blogosphere: What is this high-tech police force, and who controls it?

"It's the iPolice," said Steve Meister, a former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney. "This whole thing appears, rightly or wrongly, to be law enforcement doing the bidding of a private company.""

Journals

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The iPolice

mschuyler mschuyler writes  |  more than 4 years ago

From http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2011818180_btipolice10.html

"When a top-secret prototype of Apple's new iPhone went missing recently, the computer giant summoned Silicon Valley's version of the cavalry â" an elite squad whose main mission is investigating crimes against high-tech companies.

Little-known outside the tech world, the unit suddenly entered the spotlight with its April 23 raid on the San Francisco Bay Area home of Jason Chen, the 29-year-old technology blogger who had gained possession of the phone.

The unit swept in after Chen posted a photo and details of the new iPhone on the Gizmodo.com website. But the raid itself became secondary to a larger discussion in Silicon Valley and the blogosphere: What is this high-tech police force, and who controls it?

"It's the iPolice," said Steve Meister, a former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney. "This whole thing appears, rightly or wrongly, to be law enforcement doing the bidding of a private company."

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Are Updates Critical?

mschuyler mschuyler writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Yeah, I know this is /., but I live in a Windows-centric world and come here for fresh air. I have recently come across an attitide by some Techs that suggests performing updates on Windows machines is an utter waste of time and causes more problems than it is worth. This conflicts with my firm's 'Best Practices' which suggests that all updates, whether critical or not, are to be implemented as soon as possible. I certainly agree that it is a pain in the behind to do, even when 'automated,' but I must say I have not experienced updates causing very many problems in real life. It's happened once or twice, usually with esoteric and expensive software on a dedicated server, but it certainly is not pervasive. As I remember, the last security audit we had looked at this issue. Since we do them right now, it wasn't an issue and didn't come up in the discussions. So my question is, what do you all think about this? Thanks.

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