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At 40, a person is ...

mschuyler I'm a much younger 65 than my parents were (150 comments)

It's true. When I look at their activities and their lifestyle when they were 65, I am much more active and act "younger" than they did at this age. This is not just a perception issue on my part. My father would never have plaid SW:TOR with his grandson nor eagerly awaited Dragon Age Inquisition. The bar has moved up for everyone across the board. And yes, I DID retire early at 55. That just gives me more time to level up!

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Can a Felon Work In IT?

mschuyler He did not mix up felonies and misdemeanors (718 comments)

He said he had both. "I am a felon with several misdemeanors." He may have been unclear, but he did not mix them up.

He also did not enumerate any of them. That doesn't automatically mean they were for non-serious crimes and has nothing to do with the fact that the US has some idiotic laws on the books that can make felons out of "really nice people." This "poor baby, I'm so sorry you live in the US" crap just turns criminals into victims.

He had at least one felony and several misdemeanors in his background. That points to some sort of "life of crime" that is likely more than youthful indiscretions. Without more information we can only speculate what those were. This is information OP has not provided, perhaps willfully, as the type of crimes would surely would surely influence our answers.

When a company does a background check, they get back more than just "1 felony, 3 misdemeanors." They get back what he did. And if they don't want to hire him under those circumstances, they may have very good reasons.

Sometime what you do actually does influence your future. But "He was just turning his life around" is a stock phrase in nearly every article about yet another arrest. What you do shows your character, and if that messes you up, that's really too bad, but tough.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Making a 'Wife Friendly' Gaming PC?

mschuyler Re:Get a laptop, turn off the sound (720 comments)

It's all relative. If the spouse is looking for zero noise and a whisper-quiet front room, turning on a cell phone will be too loud. But compare a laptop to a tricked-out gaming box with multiple cooling fans and a huge power supply, with all the attendant cables and peripherals and a laptop is relatively benign.

I have an Alienware 17" and when the graphics card fan starts up you can definitely hear it, but I've never had a complaint. It's unclear from the OP if it's just box noise that is the issue here, or if it's possibly surround sound with deep bass explosion that is driving spouse nuts. If it's the latter I can certainly understand the issue and suggest a pair of good headphones,

Hard core gamers will tell you a laptop is inappropriate, but I can't imagine playing at a desk in front of a large monitor. On a soft couch with the laptop propped in my lap is far more comfortable, though a touchpad mouse does not bode well for quick reaction times.

BTW, I have to laugh at those slashdotters telling OP to grow up and stop gaming. I'm 65 and play Star Wars, the Old Republic and Dragon Age: Inquisition with my grandson.

about three weeks ago
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I'm most interested in robots that will...

mschuyler Re:I don't mind driving (307 comments)

Nice idea where distances are cooperative. New York to LA--not so much

about a month ago
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Did you use technology to get into mischief as a child?

mschuyler Re:Define technology (231 comments)

I think the idea is that B&W TVs were a "fad" in the fifties, not the late seventies. If you were 65, your original comment would make sense. At 35.....maybe not.

about 3 months ago
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Ask David Saltzberg About Being The Big Bang Theory's Science Advisor

mschuyler Re:How does he (226 comments)

Why this would be marked a Troll is puzzling in that it is an absolute fact.

about 3 months ago
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Ask David Saltzberg About Being The Big Bang Theory's Science Advisor

mschuyler How do you explain slashdot's reaction? (226 comments)

Although I realize you are a "physicist," not a "psychologist," it's still one of those "phy" type words. What do you think of Slashdot's (so far) overwhelmingly negative reaction to its editors asking for questions about the SCIENCE of the show for the show's SCIENCE ADVISOR and instead getting comments about the show's characterizations, humor, laugh track, and a fixation on the size of Kaley Cuoco's breasts? As the show's SCIENCE ADVISOR are you in a position to change or influence any of these "transgressions?"

Is this proof that the Geekdom of Slashdot is not capable of paying attention to the question at hand and has completely missed the point, were all forced to play the cello as kids, are letting their pent up emotions get in the way of asking an intelligent question and instead choose to lash out at a show they all watch, or still, after all these years, are incapable of getting laid? Or all of the above?

about 3 months ago
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Ask David Saltzberg About Being The Big Bang Theory's Science Advisor

mschuyler Re:How does he (226 comments)

Actually, she had them "augmented." She said it was the best thing she has ever done.

about 3 months ago
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Climate Change Skeptic Group Must Pay Damages To UVA, Michael Mann

mschuyler Move along. Nothing to see here (497 comments)

So it's perfectly OK to "hide the decline." After all, it doesn't really matter if tree ring data shows a decline in temperature in modern times when the temperature is obviously rising as shown by accurate thermometers. We'll just use the tree ring data as a proxy for past temperatures anyway. And when we discover the "anomaly" we'll just neglect to extend that graph line because it would be awkward to explain just why that green line is headed down, down, down while everything else is headed up.

After all, we're only coming off the "Little Ice Age" and are in an inter-glacial period. We can explain the "Medieval Warming Period" and the "Roman Warming Period" They're just "local variations," you know.

And so what if Al Gore got his CO2 readings and his temperature readings backwards, thus claiming CO2 caused temperature rises when the rises came first? It makes a very scary looking graph.

And what about the ice core samples from Greenland that show the "Hockey Stick" is such a minor glitch it can't be seen? Don't worry. We can change the scale to make it look bad and besides, no matter what input we use, as long as it's "red noise" (like stock prices) we get a hockey stick anyway! So no matter what we do, we can show how alarming it is!

Oh, and did we put some of our temperature gauges in asphalt parking lots in the south? Don't worry, we've "adjusted" those readings artificially.

After all, we're SCIENTISTS and we can explain everything. Move along. There's nothing to see here.

Chemtrails are real, too....

about 5 months ago
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Future of Cars: Hydrogen Fuel Cells, Or Electric?

mschuyler Re:setting the world on fire (659 comments)

How many gasoline cars catch on fire every year? Thousands.

How many Teslas have caught on fire ever? Two

Conclusion: Teslas catch on fire.

about 7 months ago
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Did the Ignition Key Just Die?

mschuyler So 19th century (865 comments)

Using a key is so 19th century. Pushing a button? 20th century. Embedded RFID is where it's at. Get in the car; it turns on. End of story.

about 7 months ago
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

mschuyler Re:4 million people disagree (336 comments)

4 million people was the figure quoted. 4 million people "disagreed." I assumed that was the population of Detroit. Obviously that was wrong, It's the "Metro area of Detroit" that is 4 million, so you get off on a technicality, but it does NOT CHANGE THE FACT that Detroit's murder rate of 48 per 100,000 is FAR higher than more civilized parts of the country, including San Jose at 4.1 per 100,000.

Add to that the fact that the city is bankrupt through decades of mismanagement, it's houses are being bulldozed. The only thing that keeps the city going is gambling. It's police force is brutal, as is its extremes of climate. And its economy sucks.

Other than that, I'm sure it's a great place to live. Pardon if the rest of the country doesn't flock to live there, Meanwhile the city proper (since you insist on those numbers) has witnessed a decline in population from over a million in 1990 to 713,000 today. In other words, people are leaving as fast as they can.

about 8 months ago
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

mschuyler Re:4 million people disagree (336 comments)

Of course you have to make it through the day without getting murdered. Detroit is exceeded only by New Orleans for murder capital of America (48 per 100,000 in 2011). Compare Silicon Valley (San Jose) at 4.6 per 100,000 in 2012. So by this time next year a couple thousand of those 4 million will be dead.

There's a lot more to avoid in Detroit than the snow. I guess that makes me a wuss.

about 8 months ago
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Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

mschuyler Re:FLYOVER (336 comments)

Homeowners' Associations are like little Nazi dictatorships enforcing a bland conformity on everyone. "Think of my neighbors"? How about they worry about their own shit instead of the color of my deck railing?

about 8 months ago
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I expect to retire ...

mschuyler Re:Frist pots (341 comments)

It is by design. The "original" retirement age of 65 was set there because that was the average life expectancy. The idea was that if you managed to beat the odds, then a small pension would pay for your food and incidentals while your family was expected to provide the rest until you managed to do the right thing and kick off.

Today, of course, "retirement" has become an entitlement and you expect the government to keep you in the style you have grown to expect with a sufficient pension to maintain your independence.

about 8 months ago
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Can You Buy a License To Speed In California?

mschuyler Re:Frames are for losers (325 comments)

But it was legal because his cars were never more than 6 months old.

about 8 months ago
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A Bid To Take 3D Printing Mainstream

mschuyler How many people create the words they print? (143 comments)

The idea that 3D printing won't take off because people are not well-versed in designing their own 3D products with expensive CAD software is like saying printers won't take off because people aren't really good writers and can't afford a word processor. How many people use their printers for printing off their own words from a word processor? How many people use their printers for printing off PDF files, manuals, brochures, etc. from the Net?

Why won't 3D printers take off again?

about 8 months ago
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A Bid To Take 3D Printing Mainstream

mschuyler Re:clunky software? (143 comments)

Computers will never be all that affordable. Mass production is too much cheaper than one-off designs. Computers will continue to be for big business and hobbyists, not mainstream.

about 8 months ago

Submissions

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iPolice raid blogger

mschuyler mschuyler writes  |  more than 4 years ago

mschuyler (197441) writes "From http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2011818180_btipolice10.html

"When a top-secret prototype of Apple's new iPhone went missing recently, the computer giant summoned Silicon Valley's version of the cavalry â" an elite squad whose main mission is investigating crimes against high-tech companies.

Little-known outside the tech world, the unit suddenly entered the spotlight with its April 23 raid on the San Francisco Bay Area home of Jason Chen, the 29-year-old technology blogger who had gained possession of the phone.

The unit swept in after Chen posted a photo and details of the new iPhone on the Gizmodo.com website. But the raid itself became secondary to a larger discussion in Silicon Valley and the blogosphere: What is this high-tech police force, and who controls it?

"It's the iPolice," said Steve Meister, a former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney. "This whole thing appears, rightly or wrongly, to be law enforcement doing the bidding of a private company.""

Journals

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The iPolice

mschuyler mschuyler writes  |  more than 4 years ago

From http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2011818180_btipolice10.html

"When a top-secret prototype of Apple's new iPhone went missing recently, the computer giant summoned Silicon Valley's version of the cavalry â" an elite squad whose main mission is investigating crimes against high-tech companies.

Little-known outside the tech world, the unit suddenly entered the spotlight with its April 23 raid on the San Francisco Bay Area home of Jason Chen, the 29-year-old technology blogger who had gained possession of the phone.

The unit swept in after Chen posted a photo and details of the new iPhone on the Gizmodo.com website. But the raid itself became secondary to a larger discussion in Silicon Valley and the blogosphere: What is this high-tech police force, and who controls it?

"It's the iPolice," said Steve Meister, a former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney. "This whole thing appears, rightly or wrongly, to be law enforcement doing the bidding of a private company."

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Are Updates Critical?

mschuyler mschuyler writes  |  about 6 years ago

Yeah, I know this is /., but I live in a Windows-centric world and come here for fresh air. I have recently come across an attitide by some Techs that suggests performing updates on Windows machines is an utter waste of time and causes more problems than it is worth. This conflicts with my firm's 'Best Practices' which suggests that all updates, whether critical or not, are to be implemented as soon as possible. I certainly agree that it is a pain in the behind to do, even when 'automated,' but I must say I have not experienced updates causing very many problems in real life. It's happened once or twice, usually with esoteric and expensive software on a dedicated server, but it certainly is not pervasive. As I remember, the last security audit we had looked at this issue. Since we do them right now, it wasn't an issue and didn't come up in the discussions. So my question is, what do you all think about this? Thanks.

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