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Comments

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Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

mspohr Re:LaserJet II and LaserJet 3, LaserJet 4L (552 comments)

I still use a LaserJet 4L at home for light printing work. This is now over 20 years old. It was used heavily in business for about 5 years then light use at home. I just buy a new cartridge about once a year (recycled ones cost about $15).
This thing never jams, always feeds properly and the print quality is as crisp and sharp as the day it was new.

yesterday
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Climate Scientist: Climate Engineering Might Be the Answer To Warming

mspohr Taboo?? (341 comments)

I don't think there is much of a taboo on discussing climate engineering. It's just that all of the proposals I have heard about are just stupid / won't work / would screw up things more, etc. Then there is the "what could possibly go wrong" factor.
It's fine to discuss climate engineering but they'll have to come up with something much better than anything now out there.

4 days ago
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44% of Twitter Users Have Never Tweeted

mspohr Re:It's a good service (121 comments)

I have never "tweeted" but I do follow a few blogs, individuals, events, etc.
The twitter feed itself doesn't provide much information but the links are usually valuable.

4 days ago
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Anyone Can Buy Google Glass April 15

mspohr Re:And this is why I won't get Glass (167 comments)

They don't seem to have any problem finding customers at that price.
I personally am not interested. I just don't see myself walking around wearing this thing. Not sure what I would do with it. It seems really nerdy and creepy. However, if I had a specific application in mind... something like recording surgery, automobile repair (or service and repair in many industries) then I could see it.
I do have a Google Chromecast which is really a beta device and has been a disappointment due to very limited functionality. They are slowly adding applications but still very much a walled garden. Hopefully it will be more useful some day. I only spent $35 on it so not much risk there.

5 days ago
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Anyone Can Buy Google Glass April 15

mspohr Re:And this is why I won't get Glass (167 comments)

Google (and many other companies) do this with their beta products... you know... because they are "beta" and they want to limit the number of users to something they can handle.
For instance, Gmail was limited access at first and you had to be invited to join. I see that you are using a gmail account.

5 days ago
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Racing To Contain Ebola

mspohr Re:Is Ebola a "rapid burnout" disease? (112 comments)

That is true.
However, a complication is that people do move about in the short time before they become incapacitated.
Plus, we really don't understand well how it is transmitted and where the natural reservoirs exist so it's hard to find the source and eradicate it.

about a week ago
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Amazon Reportedly Launching Smartphone This Year

mspohr Re:Amazon Android + Locked bootloader? nnnoo. (38 comments)

The Fire "marketplace" is a pathetic second to just about any other marketplace. I'm sure their phone marketplace will be the same.

about a week ago
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Amazon Reportedly Launching Smartphone This Year

mspohr Re:Free phone (38 comments)

FreedomPop.com
Free to use... but limited.

about a week ago
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Amazon Reportedly Launching Smartphone This Year

mspohr Re:Try as hard as you want, Amazon (38 comments)

Walmart and Amazon honorable?
AFAIK both of these companies abuse and underpay their employees. No honor in working there. No honor in buying stuff there.

about a week ago
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Cost Skyrockets For United States' Share of ITER Fusion Project

mspohr Re:Can't the US follow their plans? (174 comments)

Unless you are on a military "cost+" contract. Then you have a license to print money.

about a week ago
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Michael Bloomberg: You Can't Teach a Coal Miner To Code

mspohr Re:He's right! (578 comments)

It's hard to find out exactly what he said since all I can find are news stories, many which repeat the headline. It would be nice to have a transcript. I'm sure what he said was more nuanced than what is being reported. The "Can't teach a coalminer to code" looks like it will live forever... at least in the Twitterverse.
Anyone have a link to an actual transcript?

about a week ago
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Michael Bloomberg: You Can't Teach a Coal Miner To Code

mspohr Re:He's right! (578 comments)

I don't think the elite would approve of investing that much money in the education of coal miners. They are just viewed as "dumb labor" and it would be dangerous to educate them.

about a week ago
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Michael Bloomberg: You Can't Teach a Coal Miner To Code

mspohr Re:He's right! (578 comments)

Sure, coding is not for everyone but it just shows the arrogance of this capitalist pig Bloomberg when he assumes that coal miners are stupid and can't be retrained.
Coal miners as a group are probably just as smart as the entitled 1% who had education opportunities. So yes, you can train coal miners for other jobs (including coding). It's just elitist to assume otherwise.

about a week ago
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Under the Chassis: A Look At Tesla's Battery Shield

mspohr Re:Problems? (152 comments)

As we all know, the folks here at /. all know much more about everything than anyone else so they are eminently qualified to opine on any subject. In the current case, I am sure that the engineers at Tesla will read every comment carefully to see where they have gone wrong and try to correct their mistakes even though they cannot equal the brain power and engineering prowess of the collective "Slashdot hive mind".
Let the flame wars begin!

about a week ago
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Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

mspohr Re:Politics is people, my friend. (1111 comments)

Not sure what the High Speed rail bond issue has to do with the definition of "political campaign" since that term is not anywhere in the article you referenced. It does talk about politics and campaigns but those two word are separated by a lot of other words.
Just a few tips on using Google for the naive: If you are looking for a term consisting of more than one word, put the term in quotes and you'll get better results. You can also use the Google "define": To see a definition for a word or phrase, simply type the word “define” then a space, then the word(s) you want defined.

about two weeks ago
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Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

mspohr Re:Use a Dictionary (1111 comments)

I guess you couldn't comprehend the sentence where I said I looked up the definition(s) of "political campaign" and all of them referred to people.
Your definitions for "politics" are interesting but they are not definitions for "political campaign".
Try a course in "reading comprehension". It's the next step where you put "words" together to convey "ideas".

about two weeks ago
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Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

mspohr Politics is people, my friend. (1111 comments)

Nit-picking here: All of the definitions of a political campaign I could find (OK, I spent 5 minutes on Google) define a political campaign as a campaign for a candidate to get elected. They say nothing about ballot initiatives such as Proposition 8 which is a referendum on state law. Not sure how California law defines it but in my book, politics is people and corporations, organizations, laws and policies are not people.

about two weeks ago
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Meet the Diehards Who Refuse To Move On From Windows XP

mspohr Practice "safe computing"? (641 comments)

I often see people say things like this... they don't visit "risky" web sites or open unknown attachments.
I guess there is some value in this but there really is no way to protect yourself since you don't know what is infected and where. Today the NYTimes had an article about security which told about a company which was infected by a hacker who planted malware on the server of a Chinese restaurant which was popular for lunch takeout.... How do you protect against that?
Windows 7 and 8 may be better than XP but there are still thousands of ways malware can get into the machines.
I just think that anyone who is really concerned about security wouldn't use Windows. I know that OSX and Linux are also theoretically vulnerable but the real world numbers for infections are much lower (several orders of magnitude) than Windows.
Clearly the people still using XP have accepted the risks or are stuck with it for some reason (some old proprietary software which they just can't get rid of).
"Safe computing" is impossible.

about two weeks ago
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It's Time To Plug the Loopholes In Pipeline Regulation

mspohr Re:No problem! (163 comments)

I should trust you?
The Wikipedia article has 36 references.
Where are your references for your theory?

about two weeks ago
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It's Time To Plug the Loopholes In Pipeline Regulation

mspohr Re:No problem! (163 comments)

There was plenty of generating capacity.
The crisis was created by market manipulation by Enron and others. They were able to manipulate the market because it was DE-regulated.
Now that we have better regulations in place, the market is working better.
From Wikipedia:
California had an installed generating capacity of 45GW. At the time of the blackouts, demand was 28GW. A demand supply gap was created by energy companies, mainly Enron, to create an artificial shortage. Energy traders took power plants offline for maintenance in days of peak demand to increase the price.[9][10] Traders were thus able to sell power at premium prices, sometimes up to a factor of 20 times its normal value. Because the state government had a cap on retail electricity charges, this market manipulation squeezed the industry's revenue margins, causing the bankruptcy of Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and near bankruptcy of Southern California Edison in early 2001.[11]
The financial crisis was possible because of partial deregulation legislation instituted in 1996 by the California Legislature (AB 1890) and Governor Pete Wilson. Enron took advantage of this deregulation and was involved in economic withholding and inflated price bidding in California's spot markets.[12]
The crisis cost between $40 to $45 billion.[13]

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Bugs in SCADA software leaves 7,600 factories vulnerable

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about two weeks ago

mspohr (589790) writes "The BBC reports:
The discovery of bugs in software used to run oil rigs, refineries and power plants has prompted a global push to patch the widely used control system. The bugs were found by security researchers and, if exploited, could give attackers remote access to control systems for the installations.
The US Department of Homeland Security said an attacker with "low skill" would be able to exploit the bugs. About 7,600 plants around the world are using the vulnerable software.
"We went from zero to total compromise," said Juan Vazquez, a researcher at security firm Rapid7 who, with colleague Julian Diaz, found several holes in Yokogawa's Centum CS 3000 software which was first released to run on Windows 98 to monitor and control machinery in many large industrial installations.
The researchers also explored other SCADA software: "We ended up finding over 1,000 bugs in 100 days,""

Link to Original Source
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Reporting from the Web's Underbelly

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 2 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "The NY Times has an interesting article about Brian Krebs (Krebs on Security):
"In the last year, Eastern European cybercriminals have stolen Brian Krebs’s identity a half dozen times, brought down his website, included his name and some unpleasant epithets in their malware code, sent fecal matter and heroin to his doorstep, and called a SWAT team to his home just as his mother was arriving for dinner."
His reporting is definitely on the edge. "Mr. Krebs, 41, tries to write pieces that cannot be found elsewhere. His widely read cybersecurity blog, Krebs on Security, covers a particularly dark corner of the Internet: profit-seeking cybercriminals, many based in Eastern Europe, who make billions off pharmaceutical sales, malware, spam, frauds and heists like the recent ones that Mr. Krebs was first to uncover at Adobe, Target and Neiman Marcus."
The article concludes with this: "Mr. Joffe worries Mr. Krebs’s enemies could do far worse. “I don’t understand why he hasn’t moved to a new, undisclosed address,” he said. “But Brian needs a bodyguard.” (He does have a shotgun.)"

Link to Original Source
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Want to remotely control a car? $20 in parts.

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 2 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "From the The Register:
"Spanish hackers have been showing off their latest car-hacking creation; a circuit board using untraceable, off-the-shelf parts worth $20 that can give wireless access to the car's controls while it's on the road.
The device, which will be shown off at next month's Black Hat Asia hacking conference, uses the Controller Area Network (CAN) ports car manufacturers build into their engines for computer-system checks. Once assembled, the smartphone-sized device can be plugged in under some vehicles, or inside the bonnet of other models, and give the hackers remote access to control systems.
"A car is a mini network," security researcher Alberto Garcia Illera told Forbes. "And right now there's no security implemented.""

Link to Original Source
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Travel to Sochi for the Olympics, Get Hacked?

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 2 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "If you're headed to Sochi for the Winter Olympics, it might be best to stay off the grid.
The State Department has already warned travelers that they should have no expectation of privacy while in Russia. And now, NBC's Richard Engel has demonstrated just how easy it is to get hacked while at the games.
Engel, NBC's chief foreign correspondent, teamed with Kyle Wilhoit, a threat researcher with TrendMicro, to test how quickly devices could be compromised while in Russia.
According to Engel's report, the smartphone was attacked almost instantly... The PCs were also breached almost instantaneously from someone who appeared to be in Russia.
(Wilhoit said he will publish a more technical blog post on Friday that details exactly how the devices were compromised.)"

Link to Original Source
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Make your own Bitcoin!

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 3 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "Since the source code for Bitcoin is open source, we have seen several copies or enhancements of Bitcoin (Litecoin, Dogecoin or Coinye West, anyone?... There are about 70 listed on this site: http://coinmarketcap.com/ )
Now you, too, can have your own cryptocurrency! Thanks to Matt Corallo, a veteran bitcoin developer, you can easily create your own at this site: coingen.io
He has automated the process of modifying the source code to create custom currencies. Just enter in the name for your new currency, a logo image and set a few parameters (or accept the defaults) and for the grand sum of as little as 0.05 Bitcoin, you can have your own cryptocurrency in 30 minutes! Source code and some customizations are a bit extra.
Once you have your own "coin", you just need to convince people that it is worth something."

Link to Original Source
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Claims of virgin births in U.S. near 1 percent

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 4 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "Each year, the British Medical Journal (BMJ) publishes a set of interesting articles which are, while scientifically correct, do not meet the usual criteria for publication (untraditional papers).
This highlight of this year's edition is one which found that 0.8% of US females reported virgin births. That is, they reported that they had never had intercourse and that they had been pregnant. It should be noted that they did not claim immaculate conception, they just reported (on regular surveys) that they had been pregnant and (in a separate section of the survey) had never had intercourse.
"The authors of "Like a virgin (mother)" — whose prose is devoid of irony — say such scientifically impossible claims show researchers must use care in interpreting self-reported behavior. Fallible memory, beliefs and wishes can cause people to err in what they tell scientists."
These results are from a large, well regarded, longitudinal study of women in the USA.
Some insight into these findings:
"Of those who said they became pregnant as virgins, 31 percent also said they had signed chastity pledges; 15 percent of nonvirgins who became pregnant said they had signed such pledges, in which a girl vows not to have sex until she marries."
Also:
"The ostensibly chaste mothers were also less likely to know how to use condoms, according to the report. " (duh... this could be a big clue here!)
Finally the authors also report (again, without irony) that: "The researchers found that although the mothers in question were more likely to have boys than girls, and to be pregnant during the weeks leading up to Christmas, neither similarity to the Virgin Mary was statistically significant."
Merry Christmas to Jesus and all the gang."

Link to Original Source
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Pee Analyzer and RFID to stop drunk drivers

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 5 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "A Singapore nightclub has installed devices in their urinals which test for drunk patrons. When a patron is over the limit, the device identifies him by the RFID card in his pocket and tags the card. It also displays a warning above the urinal. When he goes to pick up his car, the warning is displayed and there is another opportunity to take a cab.
Apparently they don't prevent claiming the car but about 2/3 of patrons decide to take a cab.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2OdA7DUOAQ"

Link to Original Source
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David Miranda is Nobody's Errand-Boy

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 5 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes ""When Glenn Greenwald’s 28-year-old Brazilian partner was detained in London this summer while transporting documents related to the bombshell Edward Snowden story, many assumed he was unfairly roped into a situation he didn’t understand. That couldn’t be further from the truth."
BuzzFeed has a lengthy interview with Miranda which gives lots of interesting details about Snowden in Hong Kong, Laura Poitras in Germany, his detention in the UK, and his life with Greenwald in Brazil.
Warning: This is a long article. If you don't have the time to read it, please don't comment tl;dr... just move on."

Link to Original Source
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Electrical Grid Is Called Vulnerable to Power Shutdown

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 6 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "An interesting article in the NY Times: "Two researchers discovered that they could freeze, or crash, the software that monitors a substation, thereby blinding control center operators from the power grid."
These two engineers wrote software to test for vulnerabilities in the control systems of electrical power grids which use a protocol called DNP3 to communicate with sub-stations. They first tested an open source implementation of the protocol and didn't find any problems. They were worried that their software test wasn't adequate so they started testing proprietary systems. The broke every single one of the 16 proprietary systems they tested initially and found a further 9 systems vulnerable in later testing. They were able to install malware and also found firewalls ineffective.
They reported this to the Department of Homeland Security’s Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team, I.C.S.-C.E.R.T. and didn't get much of a response.
Scary that our electrical grid is so vulnerable and there doesn't seem to be much urgency to get it fixed. A few patches have been issued but who knows if the systems have been updated?"

Link to Original Source
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Snowden Says He Took No Secret Files to Russia

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 6 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "Interesting interview with Edward Snowden in the NYTimes where he talks freely about his decision to start collecting documents. His experience in reporting problems and abuse convinced him he would be discredited. He also states he didn't take any of the documents to Russia and that the Chinese don't have them either. He turned them all over to the journalists. He also corrects last week's NYTimes story about the derogatory comment in his personnel file... it was due to him discovering and trying to report a vulnerability in the CIA's internal software. Interesting read."
Link to Original Source
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Cyclists' Time-Trial Dilemma Solved

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 7 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "The MIT Technology Review has given us a definitive answer to the age-old question: "On a closed track against a powerful head/tailwind, what racing strategy should a cyclist adopt?"
The problem is that aerodynamic drag, which is the predominant drag force, is not linear. After making a few simplifying assumptions, he comes up with a simple rule of thumb: "His rule of thumb is to ride at the target speed plus a quarter of the wind speed when you have a tailwind and to ride at your target speed minus half the wind speed when the wind is in your face."
Full paper (un-gated): http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.1741"

Link to Original Source
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Bruce Schneier: NSA Spying Is Making Us Less Safe

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 7 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "An interview with Bruce Schneier in the MIT Technology Review offers some unique insight and hints at future revelations on the Snowden papers. Bruce points out "What these leaks reveal is how robust NSA surveillance is, how pervasive it is, and to what degree the NSA has commandeered the entire Internet and turned it into a surveillance platform."
In addition: "They’re not just spying on the bad guys, they’re deliberately weakening Internet security for everyone—including the good guys. It’s sheer folly to believe that only the NSA can exploit the vulnerabilities they create. Additionally, by eavesdropping on all Americans, they’re building the technical infrastructure for a police state."
He also has an interesting analogy for the way the NSA "asks" for backdoors: "The way it seems to go, it’s never an explicit request from the NSA. It’s more of a joking thing: “So, are you going to give us a back door?” If you act amenable, then the conversation progresses. If you don’t, it’s completely deniable. It’s like going out on a date. Sex might never be explicitly mentioned, but you know it’s on the table."
Finally, he disses his five tips for avoiding NSA surveillance: "My five tips suck. They are not things the average person can use. One of them is to use PGP [a data-encryption program]. But my mother can’t use PGP. Maybe some people who read your publication will use my tips, but most people won’t. Basically, the average user is screwed."
He hints at further revelations in articles he is preparing for The Guardian."

Link to Original Source
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How to foil NSA sabotage: use a dead man's switch

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 7 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "Cory Doctorow has an interesting idea published in todays Guardian on how to approach the problem of NSA "gag orders" which prevent web sites, etc. from telling anyone that they have been compromised. His idea is to set up a "dead man" switch where a site would publish a statement that "We have not been contacted by the government" ... until, of course, they were contacted and compromised. The statement would then disappear since it would no longer be true.
He points out a few problems... Not making the statement could be considered a violation of disclosure... but, can the government force you to lie and state that you haven't been contacted when you actually have?"

Link to Original Source
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Skype: has Microsoft's $8.5bn spending paid off yet – and can it?

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 8 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "The Guardian has an article by Charles Arthur who predicted: "In May 2011, when Microsoft announced its planned purchase of Skype for $8.5bn (£5,5bn), I called it "a gamble unlikely to pay off".
Just over two years later, has the gamble in fact paid off – or does it show signs of doing so?
What follows is a fairly detailed analysis of his original criticism (he was wrong about some parts), an update on Skype performance and a conclusion that it's not as bad as some of the other acquisitions... damning with faint praise."

Link to Original Source
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EFF Victory: Release of Secret Court Opinion: NSA Surveillance Unconstitutional

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 8 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "For over a year, EFF has been fighting the government in federal court to force the public release of an 86-page opinion of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC). Issued in October 2011, the secret court's opinion found that surveillance conducted by the NSA under the FISA Amendments Act was unconstitutional and violated "the spirit of" federal law.
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/08/eff-victory-results-expected-release-secret-court-opinion-finding-nsa-surveillance
Further coverage at the NYTimes: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/22/us/2011-ruling-found-an-nsa-program-unconstitutional.html
Judge Bates: “The Court is troubled that the government’s revelations regarding N.S.A.’s acquisition of Internet transactions mark the third instance in less than three years in which the government has disclosed a substantial misrepresentation regarding the scope of a major collection program,”"
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3D Printing Failures = spaghetti and meat balls

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 8 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "3D printing enthusiast Richard Horne has a Flickr web site for 3D printing failures.
He comments: "I've had a lot more failures than successes... it's not as easy as it seems... you can learn quite a lot from failure."
"The Art of 3D Print failure."
http://www.flickr.com/groups/3d-print-failures/
Lots of interesting photos and useful information for 3D printing."

Link to Original Source
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Helping Snowden Spill His Secrets

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 8 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "Great article in the NYTimes Magazine section by Peter Maass. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/18/magazine/laura-poitras-snowden.html

It goes into a lot of detail on how Snowden first attempted to contact Glenn Greenwald (who couldn't use secure communication at first) and then contacted Laura Poitras who was making a documentary about security. Lots of detail about their getting together, vetting each other, and personal threats to Greenwald and Poitras (as well as Snowden) as well as a good timeline of how events unfolded.
After reading this article I am more concerned than ever about the extent of US surveillance and the extent to which the USG will go to suppress information and intimidate whistle-blowers. Good to see that the NYTimes finally publish some real journalism on this subject.
Also... accompanying transcript of "Q&A — Edward Snowden" http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/18/magazine/snowden-maass-transcript.html"

Link to Original Source
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Researchers Steer Off Course to Show Potential Power of 'GPS Spoofing'

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 8 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "New research shows the GPS software we all rely on can be hacked and manipulated. In June, a team at the University of Texas employed "GPS spoofing" to disorient the navigation system on a luxury yacht. Jeffrey Brown talks with Todd Humphreys, the researcher behind the projects, along with technology analyst Milton Clary."
Link to Original Source
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NSA Spying Hurts California's Business

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about 9 months ago

mspohr (589790) writes "Interesting opinion piece by Joe Mathews published today (http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2013/jul/13/could-nsa-spying-hurt-california-economy/all/?print)
makes the argument that California's economic life depends on global connections. "Our leading industries — shipping, tourism, technology, and entertainment — could not survive, much less prosper, without the trust and goodwill of foreigners. We are home to two of the world’s busiest container ports, and we are a leading exporter of engineering, architectural, design, financial, insurance, legal, and educational services. All of our signature companies — Apple, Google, Facebook, Oracle, Intel, Hewlett-Packard, Chevron, Disney — rely on sales and growth overseas. And our families and workplaces are full of foreigners; more than one in four of us were born abroad, and more than 50 countries have diaspora populations in California of more than 10,000."
It quotes John Dvorak: "Our companies have billions and billions of dollars in overseas sales and none of the American companies can guarantee security from American spies. Does anyone but me think this is a problem for commerce?”
It points out that: "Asian governments and businesses are now moving their employees and systems off Google’s Gmail and other U.S.-based systems, according to Asian news reports. German prosecutors are investigating some of the American surveillance. The issue is becoming a stumbling block in negotiations with the European Union over a new trade agreement. Technology experts are warning of a big loss of foreign business."
The article goes on to suggest that perhaps a California constitutional ammendment confirming privacy rights might help (but would not guarantee a stop to Federal snooping)."
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Web of Tax Shelters Saved Apple Billions, Inquiry Finds

mspohr mspohr writes  |  about a year ago

mspohr (589790) writes "Apple relied on a “complex web of offshore entities” and U.S. tax loopholes to avoid paying billions of dollars in U.S. taxes on $44 billion in offshore income over the past four years, according to excerpts from a Senate subcommittee report to be released tomorrow as Apple CEO Tim Cook testifies on the company’s overseas operations.

The maker of iPhones and iPads used at least three foreign subsidiaries that it claims are not “tax resident in any nation” to help it avoid paying billions in “otherwise taxable offshore income,” the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations said in a statement today. "
Coverage in Forbes:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/connieguglielmo/2013/05/20/apple-used-loopholes-to-skip-paying-44-billion-in-u-s-taxes-senate-committee-claims/
NYTimes also has coverage:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/business/apple-avoided-billions-in-taxes-congressional-panel-says.html"

Link to Original Source

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