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Comments

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Chromebooks Have a Lucrative Year; Should WinTel Be Worried?

museumpeace Re:Everybody's missing the point... (321 comments)

and, Chrome so far, has a far better record on security patches and exploits than Windows. We'll see how long that holds up but if I had to choose what laptop to put into the hands of untechnical users, security would be a big factor.

about 4 months ago
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Chromebooks Have a Lucrative Year; Should WinTel Be Worried?

museumpeace thinking back to how Microsoft gutted Netscape... (321 comments)

I find this news of Chromebook stealing Windows market share has a "they have this coming to them" feeling. So Google has the bucks and the talent to make an OS and practically give it away. Ha Ha. For them, pushing the penetration of Internet use to the lowest strata is all they need because its the clicks, not the OS licenses that make their revenue.
I feel like its karma, like the demise of MS is deserved because, in spite of Bill Gates earlier public dismissal of the Internet as fad, MS came back with a brutal, loss-leader give-away of IE just to defend itself from its own hubris [and inadvertently polluting their own OS with "back orifices"]. Google may cut the legs from under MS but primarily because they know where their bread is buttered and they work to expand that...not because they need to damage the business model of a competitor.

Microsoft has it coming.

about 4 months ago
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Citizen Science: Who Makes the Rules?

museumpeace Re:Ammoniacal (189 comments)

That is sad. Fear and ignorance have always held progress, or just plain "pleasure of finding things out" in check. But that kind of info-conservatism was one problem our supposed American freedoms banished, and we have claimed, to our enormous advantage in standard of living. What are we now? A country where fear and ignorance are institutional and pervasive. You can't go underground for your supplies either since that will clearly indicate to the bureaucracy that you had nefarious intent. *sigh*

about 4 months ago
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Citizen Science: Who Makes the Rules?

museumpeace ah, the good old days.... (189 comments)

I remember reading in the [now discontinued] "Amateur Scientist" column that used to publish in Scientific American, a guide to how one could build a medium power infrared CO2 laser. Nowadays, just buying the parts would have DHS knocking on your door[or maybe they don't bother with knocking?]

about 4 months ago
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RSA Flatly Denies That It Weakened Crypto For NSA Money

museumpeace for ten million dollars, (291 comments)

I would deny just about anything.

about 4 months ago
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Two Million Passwords Compromised By Keylogger Virus

museumpeace Re: Secure password vs keylogger. (174 comments)

i set my FB acct to require 2FA if its accessed from an "unfamiliar" device. Yes, I need to be carrying my phone to make that work but the two conditions, novel device and carrying cell phone DO correlate for me. I think it worth the cost of a txt message since I wind up with a record [also event notification emails] of any attempt to break in to my account

now if I just had any social life or was someone interesting enough to be spied upon, this would all be justified and useful.

about 5 months ago
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RF Safe-Stop Shuts Down Car Engines With Radio Pulse

museumpeace Re:short story (549 comments)

won't work if you drive a plastic car ['Vette, Saturn] but with metal bodywork your average care is already half way to being a Faraday cage. A concealed job of finishing that cage would be difficult but most openings just need a grounded hardware cloth covering of proper mesh [must study TFA to see what frequency is used].

Active jamming to cancel out the incoming waves is not likely due to the high frequency they probably use.

BTW, do they test this thing on Dick Cheney to see if it shuts down pacemakers?

about 5 months ago
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Computer Model Reveals Escape Plan From Poverty's Vicious Circle

museumpeace so there is an escape plan. (356 comments)

that is nice. but here in america, we have a plan to get back into the prison of poor health for poor people.

about 5 months ago
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Why Scott Adams Wished Death On His Dad

museumpeace Poor Scott and his dad... (961 comments)

all those years skewering the Pointy Haired Boss when in fact the Pointy Haired Doctor was on a collision course with his contentment and independence.

about 5 months ago
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Why Scott Adams Wished Death On His Dad

museumpeace Re:Should be legal, with caveat (961 comments)

I agree with this position.
Allthough there are complexities in assessing ones state of health toward the end, the majority of them can be addressed with a clear DNR order and durable power of attorney granted to a trusted younger friend...with backup provisions. In an era of smaller families and highly mobile careers, many /. readers will eventually be dying alone, sorry, just a strong probability ladies and gentlemen.

My GF works in a nursing home, surrounded by a mix of abandoned, demented people and others dying but with loving visitors. She has insisted we establish enforcible living wills and "just shoot me" are to be spelled out beyond any bureaucrats ability to meddle in our last wishes.

about 5 months ago
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Elevation Plays a Role In Memory Error Rates

museumpeace how high is your cloud? (190 comments)

How long before the cloud computing and storage services start charging a slight premium to have your stuff run/store on lower spots in their server racks?

about 5 months ago
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Mathematicians Team Up To Close the Prime Gap

museumpeace thanks, I needed that (194 comments)

so little of what news is dragged before me these days does much to make me hopeful of humanity's prospects on this planet. This story is the rare exception. We could be a great species. We could solve what looked for centuries to be impossible problems. We could...

Thanks /. This story was not in any of my regular channels today.

about 5 months ago
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How 3 Young Coders Built a Better Portal To HealthCare.gov

museumpeace New York State of Health AWOL (499 comments)

tried the Sherpa link...got nothing for my state. But then, NY doesn't need to be shown how to steer folks to health insurance options. Newyorkstateofhealth has been delivering the questionable ACA goods for a while now.

Why would a guy with no insurance call it "questionable"? It used to offer 170$/mo plans with 1200$ deductibles to guys in my category but now that any strung out hooker or dipsomaniac can be assured medical care, the cost is 300/month and the deductible is 3000$.

Where is the incentive to be personally responsible for your own health and its costs in a scheme like this?

about 5 months ago
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Researchers Dare AI Experts To Crack New GOTCHA Password Scheme

museumpeace Re:tried it (169 comments)

And what if you are color blind? I am not color blind and can't make heads or tails of these paintball shotgun patterns vs the text descriptions.

Yes one objective is to frustrate bots ...but if you frustrate humans, as pla points out, then you are a non-starter. Go back to your room CMU compsci person 'cause I know you are smart enough to do better.

about 6 months ago
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Security Breach Forces Bitcoin Bank Inputs.io To Halt Operations

museumpeace Re:Secure Online Wallet (285 comments)

Unfortunately for the average consumer, in fact virtually all consumers, the present scheme for credit card online purchases, e.g. Amazon, is trying to tell you that you can have all 3. What percent of consumers have to take a loss before either they or their card provider's insurance co. pulls the plug on this bizarre bazaar?

about 6 months ago
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Security Breach Forces Bitcoin Bank Inputs.io To Halt Operations

museumpeace Re:Secure Online Wallet (285 comments)

i'd pick Secure and Wallet and screw Online...air gap for me.

about 6 months ago
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Security Breach Forces Bitcoin Bank Inputs.io To Halt Operations

museumpeace motives? (285 comments)

It does not sound like Nation State Attacker was at work here.
The attack was not so sophisticated that the infosec boys were left scratching their heads as to how the breach was made. In fact, for a so-called vault, Inputs.io leaving up the access to old accounts that skirt 2FA seems sloppy.
And, certainly, having 4100 BTC to spend for your porn and drugs would be motivation to some who are capable of such an attack.

But I assume central banks and gov'ts with propped up currencies don't want to see Bitcoin really take off. Just breaking everyone's trust in BTC is a win for them.

about 6 months ago
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Swiss Government Backs Privacy Oriented ISP

museumpeace there is a cost (109 comments)

It costs, yes, real money, to keep your information private.
witness the positive and contrapositve:
1. the slow but steady growth of app.net, a paid subscription social web SERVICE/platform [handily the equal or better of /. IMO] that takes a bit of your money instead of of selling your ID-related data [no f**king ads for those of you who can read but not connect dots]
2. the way all the "free" web services provided by Google, Farcebook, (and god knows what Twitter will suck out of you for the stockholder's benefit and turn over to random hustlers)
3. yahoo, amazon, etc...what service have you used for free and then NOT seen strangely appropriate adverts in the side bar?
4. Swiss bank accounts are synonymous with "privacy means not having to pay my share of the social contract"

so, how will the Swiss pay for this service??? or will YOU pay for it in their stead, as a very few of you pay for their banking services?

about 6 months ago
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Germany: We Think NSA May Have Tapped Chancellor Merkel's Cell Phone

museumpeace "Mr. President" (267 comments)

"In 10 seconds, the phone will ring. It will Angela Merkel."

about 6 months ago

Submissions

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Wikileaks publishes recent draft of secret TPP accord

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  about 5 months ago

museumpeace (735109) writes "The Verge has a summary of content and reaction to a new draft of the Trans Pacific Partnership, a secretively concocted trade agreement which, it reports, "would allow more intellectual property to be protected by patents or other rights, and for those rights to be expanded as well. WikiLeaks says that TPP would effectively instate many of the surveillance and law enforcement regulations proposed in the highly controversial SOPA and ACTA laws."
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Not net neutrality...again

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  about 6 months ago

museumpeace (735109) writes "According to Marvin Ammori at Wired, the big carriers have played regulatory chess well and have FCC and EFF and most of us caught in an end-game where one last court case can free the backbone providers to extort higher or extra fees if a website or content provider wants content to load quickly. (a) I didn't know it was that close to done (b) where will carriers put the brakes on traffic and is there no way around them?"
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Would you secure personal data with DRM tools?

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  about 6 months ago

museumpeace (735109) writes "From its own EmTech conference, Technology Review reports on a privacy strategy from Microsoft's Craig Mundie: When sharing music online took off in the 1990s, many companies turned to digital rights management (DRM) software as a way to restrict what could be done with MP3s and other music files—only to give up after the approach proved ineffective and widely unpopular. Today Craig Mundie, senior advisor to the CEO at Microsoft, resurrected the idea, proposing that a form of DRM could be used to prevent personal data from being misused."
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What the web "really is" for most users

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  about a year ago

museumpeace writes "I have only found one other [ 2004] slashdot story reference to the rather insightful Paul Ford. But then, he seems unaware of /.
He has written a post that gets to the heart of web forum psychology and business models which is being kicked around in other tech forums. He analyzes the art of balancing content with comment, gives a few good thoughts on meta filtering and feedback, citing many examples but curiously omitting Slashdot.org."

Link to Original Source
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Is MicroSoft the only target of Googles Chrome OS

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 4 years ago

museumpeace writes "The Google announcement of its new OS project which they somewhat confusingly also name after their browser offering, is described exclusively as an attack on Microsoft OS dominance. None of the tech news outlets that should know better mention other targets. But honestly, How is a web-top OS done on an Open source basis not a swipe at Intel/Moblin?"
Link to Original Source
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summer intern wanted: must like skewering patents

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  about 5 years ago

museumpeace writes "John Quiggin, an Australian economist who writes at Crooked Timber is looking for some help this summer. This being slashdot, some of you might be interested in his regard for IP: " The intellectual debate has been running hard against strong IP for a long time, and changes in technology have ... revealed, on a scale much larger than before, the benefits that can be realised from free access to ideas. Meanwhile the extension of IP rights, and the expansion of powers to protect them has rolled on as if none of this was happening." [and the job is in NY ]"
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Whither MSFT: InfoWorld's crystal ball

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 5 years ago

museumpeace writes "InfoWorld executive editor Galen Gruman has brainstormed five different scenarios for MicroSoft in the coming decade and solicits the reader's vote on which is more likely. Does it tank? Does it go open source? Does it out-Google Google? Does Ballmer really fill Gate's shoes? Amusing to read...or maybe you have a more prescient scenario to share in the comments?"
Link to Original Source
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Internet retards mental aging???

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 5 years ago

museumpeace writes "Various news outlets have picked up the press release of "A team of scientists from the University of California Los Angeles [which reports] that internet use among the middle aged stimulates certain sections of the brain and can counteract the natural slowing of thought processes that occurs as we get older." Based on a 24 person sample, its teh science /.ers love to hate. Besides,we have all seen a rather opposite effect."
Link to Original Source
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US no longer the world's internet hub

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 5 years ago

museumpeace writes "It seems inevitable and mostly for positive reasons such as IP connectivity becoming truly universal, but I am saddened a bit to see the US slip behind other nations as the world's dominant hub for internet traffic The negative reason? Michael Heyden of the CIA came right out and said it: "Because of the nature of global telecommunications, we are playing with a tremendous home-field advantage, and we need to exploit that edge,""
Link to Original Source
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A map of the tides content owners try to fight

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  about 6 years ago

museumpeace writes "slashdotters constantly chew on stories like the first sale doctrine and the endless maneuvering of RIAA, MPAA, follies of DMCA and DRM in general etc. I think of each of those stories as like trying to make sense of a particular earthquake. In Huffington Post, blogger Jonathan Handel lays out briefly six tectonic market and technology forces by which sense could be made all of this. Sample his point #5, the media IS the money: 'Fifth is market forces in the technology industry. Computers, web services, and consumer electronic devices are more valuable when more content is available. In turn, these products make content more usable by providing new distribution channels. Traditional media companies are slow to adopt these new technologies, for fear of cannibalizing revenue...'"
Link to Original Source
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which far out technologies might just be possible?

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 6 years ago

museumpeace writes "In the NYTimes book review blog, David Itzkoff Looks at a new book devoted to predicting which "science fiction" technologies may really fly some day. The author is Michio Kaku, one of the inventors of string theory, so he bears a hearing. His picks include light sabers, invisibility and force fields. And if you call right now, you could leave a comment."
Link to Original Source
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museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 7 years ago

museumpeace writes "I have no idea why the last time John Paczkowski's writing was mentioned in /. was back in 2001. His informative and often side-spliting snark was the backbone of the Good Morning Silicon Valley blog for the last seven years. But no more. Someone had to do for high tech and venture capital what Wonkette did for the petty and petting pols in our nation's capital. For the sake of my reading pleasure I hope they find a good replacement."
top

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 7 years ago

museumpeace writes "Harvard researchers have used nanofabrication methods to join an antenna of optical wavelength dimensions directly to a laser to produce sub-wavelength focus control. Should enable many new applications. from the art.: "Eventually, we envision the laser integrated into new probes for biology like optical tweezers — which can manipulate objects as small as a single atom," says Crozier. "It could also be used for integrated-circuit fabrication or to test impurities during the fabrication process itself. One day, consumers might be able to back up three terabytes data on one disk.""

Journals

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How not to write for Slashdot posting

museumpeace museumpeace writes  |  more than 8 years ago ============ Taking Rejection Personally ===========

useless rationalizations for why the dice don't come up "Accepted"

  1. Physicist betting 50/50 chance time travel is even possible.
    News@nature.com gives a readable description of physicist Amos Ori's article in Physical Review Letters on a better way to build a time machine. Expert Paul Davies rates it as more feasible than ideas that require the manipulation of black holes. Researchers are divided over whether any solution to the fundamental problem of a time machine, regardless of design, blowing up due to quantum mechanical instabilites will ever be found. Says Ori: "Perhaps we shall have to await the formulation of the full theory of quantum gravity before we know whether quantum instabilities provide chronology protection or not". CHRONOLOGY PROTECTION: physics lingo for "the past is unreachable".

    rejected 6PM EST 2005.07.18 [resubmitted and rejected again...whats wrong? too technical? time travel is not sexy enough?]

  2. SIT stealthy spinoff to sell unjammable radios to police
    The Technogenesis program at Stevens INstitute of Technology has spun off a start up, Attila Technologies LLC, to make wireless communications devices and services providing continuous broadband, on-demand communication devices and services. It may be a while before you get your hands on one of these things...they are marketing to cops and DHS who want to communicate even when normal cell service is broken or degraded. A former AOL VP Operations will be CEO of Attila. Search engines found nary a hint this work was afoot and SIT pages had no or broken links; the news was from a press release found on AAAS's eureakalert. A stealth mode startup that leaves me hungry for technical details!

    rejected Monday July 25, @08:06PM
    suspected reasons for rejection: factual error (SIT does have an april press release page with a slightly different name for this start-up.)

  3. CISCO coverup at Black Hat conference?
    In the Washington Post Brian Krebs reports that at the last minute, someone ripped out 30 pages of the Black Hat conference proceedings that describe a recently discovered vulnerability in Cisco routers. Michael Lynn, the researcher who was to have presented the information has not shown up at the conference as scheduled. Was this a security flaw /. has already covered or something not really patched yet or more embarrassing?

    rejected Wednesday July 27, @02:33PM

  4. VMWare to head off MSFT by sharing technology
    Hoping to keep whatever moves Microsoft may make in Virtual Machine technology from swamping its increasingly successful offerings, VMWare is sharing its technology with a who's who of system vendors. News.com replays a NYTimes story explaining how the EMC subsidiary hopes to make its virtual machines a standard before Microsoft, which has been slow to work with VM's they can't own, makes its move. The consortium will include Advanced Micro Devices, Cisco Systems and Red Hat, in addition to IBM, Intel and Hewlett-Packard. Where's Sun Microsystems? Don't they have some kind of VM?

    Rejected instantly on Monday August 08, @12:24PM, I think Zonk is getting even with me.

  5. Mich. State U. offers Video Game Design minor
    Though not yet a full degree program, the Detroit News reports today on a new program at MSU that "... will give students a chance to study video games and design through its Specialization in Game Design and Development program.... as an academic minor and will provide students with 15 credit hours for a four-course sequence of classes on video game design and the history and social aspects of video games." Robert MacMillan also covered the story in the Washington [cookie eating] Post. You may be the master of the dungeon but when are you going to get a Bachelor of Video Game Design?

    Rejected Wednesday August 03, @12:22PM
    [not really news, lots of such programs exist and this was PR]

  6. Pentagon paying scientists to learn script writing
    If I hadn't read it in the NYTimes I would suspect the report was a hoax. Martin Gundersen, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California and sometime Hollywood technical adviser, convinced the Pentagon to put up $25,000 in research grants so the American Film Institute can coach a classroom of scientists and engineers from various disciplines on how to WRITE AND SELL SCREEN PLAYS FOR HOLLYWOOD. This is actually a DoD tactic to drum up more domestic interest in science careers and thus boost the ebbing supply of engineers for defense laboratories where US citizenship is needed for the required security clearances. No...it couldn't be a hoax, you can't make this stuff up!

    REJECTED Thursday August 04, @11:44AM
    perhaps I overdramatized?..I even put in a no-registration link.

  7. Microsoft crawling for malicious sites
    Simpson Garfinkle at Technology Review pionted out an interesting article in InformationWeek describing one way Microsoft is finding exploits that work against its browsers and which sites are serving those exploits. In a client-side form of the honeypot idea, MS runs a farm of XP + IE clients surfing lists of suspect URLs. The machines are at various patch levels and instrumented to detect unsolicited downloads. When a weaker machine is breached it passes the URL to a more protected system. So far over 700 sites are identified and some can infect even the most patched up XP/SP2 client. Its actually a pretty effective idea, I think.

    shows as "accepted" but was actually rejected..the later author's submission that was posted was better informed than mine since I didn't detect the story had previous /. coverage. Thursday August 11, @06:57PM

  8. Sun Grid Utility goes live for employees
    CNET is reporting that Sun Microsystems turned on its Grid computing utility, hosting large ERP applications for its employees to test out the server infrastructure and user acceptance of the Computing-as-metered-utility model. General availability is scheduled for October. The rates? "Sun is offering processing and storage in a pay-as-you-go arrangement of $1 per CPU per hour, delivered via an Internet connection". Sun is still retooling its Thin Client interfaces and support SW. Experts quoted in the article wonder if Sun can make any money this way.

    Accepted Wednesday August 24, @12:27PM, oh well, you can't loose 'em all.

  9. wireless USB: problem or solution?
    I am familliar with rats nests but I am unfamiliar with wireless USB and according to CNET, Intel thinks we all should be using it. The ink hasn't dried on a perfected WHCI standard so I can't tell if it would address some basic requirements. Surely a few /. readers may know [1] signal strength: no leakage outside of the 32foot radius mentioned? radiation hazard less than than my cell phone and wireless router? [2] Security: failure to use the password security in WiFi standards has generated many horror stories of wireless breakins. I wonder how on earth they hope to give me the security of wire without the hassle of permission schemes. Wouldn't W/USB at least give us problems like this ? [3]Though endorsed by WiMedia Alliance, is the push for W/USB for the benefit of that very complete list of vendors or a stab at the conspicuously absent Apple computer [who's bluetooth wireless periperals keep the wires to my i-book to a minimum]. [4] could they possibly meet their goal to "permit wireless USB, wireless 1394 (FireWire®) and native TCP/IP devices utilizing Multiband OFDM ultrawideband radios to operate side-by-side"? I can jam my router by putting my cordless phone next to it so I think that catastrophy is already out of the bag.

    Rejected. Thursday August 25, @01:22PM
    overlong, and by /. stanards, a bit unfocused

  10. Blogging as press freedom in repressive places
    CNN.COM is carrying an AP story from France on the release of guidelines to help bloggers working under threat of suppressive governments to get out their stories without getting caught. "Reporters Without Borders' "Handbook for Blogger and Cyber-Dissidents" is partly financed by the French government and includes technical advice on how to remain anonymous online." Makes me proud to be a developer of communication software.
  11. pro and con of what satellite photos reveal
    On the one hand hi-res satellite photos could be a huge help to rescuers scouting mountainous regions for lanslides, collapsed dams and bridges etc. On the other hand most countries think they have assets no one else should know about. One of those news stories where the comments almost write themselves.

    2:30 2005.10.18

  12. Nature is reporting today that an anti-gravity device has been patented. Despite longstanding USPTO policy to not grant patents when the claimed invention violates known laws of physics, Patent 6,960,975 is issued to Boris Volfson for a propulsion system claimed to bend spacetime using superconductors. Like other /. readers I am familliar with silly software patents but this device is less plausible than technology you've seen on Star Trek!
  13. Giving Thanks for Roasted Laptop
    Storing your laptop in the oven as a way to hide it from burglars might not be the best solution. This gal got her's done medium rare and the pictures are not pretty...but it still computes! Now its /.'s turn to roast her blog's server [go ahead, traffic usually makes a blogger's day!]

    REJECTED 2005.11.29

  14. Wiretapping Weaknesses: questionable evidence?
    The NYTimes has a story this morning about findings of Matt Blaze and others at U. Penn that call in question the effectiveness of wiretapping techniques that have long been a backbone of evidence in federal anti-racketeering and other cases. Not only do Blaze et al show how to avoid a wire tap, they claim one can cause falsified records of numbers dialed. I imagine a line of dons and cons is forming at the penitentiary phone booth to call their lawyers.

    Rejected 2005.11.30
    its clearly a /. kind of story but being in NYT,
    dozens of submissions to chose from?

  15. ESA has more powerful electric thruster
    ESA has confirmed the principle of a new space thruster that may ultimately give much more thrust than today's electric propulsion techniques. Based on demonstration of plasma double layers by Christine Charles and Rod Boswell at the Australian National University in Canberra, ESA prototypes indicate a thruster with many times the power of the main electric thruster on ESA's SMART-1 mission could be built with the same size and efficiency.

    Accepted

  16. Simpson Garfinkle on privacy in a Googled world
    Writing in Tech Review about some of the privacy issues of Gmail that haven't been in recent headlines, Simpson Garfinkle puts the financial realities that impact your privacy in thoughtfully stark terms: "Although Google is often called a search company or an e-mail provider, it earns its billions by selling clicks on targeted advertisements. Everything else is merely the honey designed to attract enough attention that some of it will spill onto those ads. Gmail's users are not Google's customers; they are its product. I personally find advertisements highly distasteful and have shied away from Gmail for that reason."

    Rejected Wednesday February 01, @10:19AM

  17. I submited the UT nano fuelcell muscle storey 2 days before someone elses submission of a derivative story was posted...WTF is that about?

    2006-03-16 21:53:46 new artifical muscle 100x strength of natural (Science,Robotics) (rejected)

  18. Really fat gravitons detected?
    In attempts to confirm general relativity, physicists may have been looking for gravitons and Gravitomagnetism in places where the noise swamps the signal. Today, ESA scientists have reported a spinning superconducting ring produces gravational acceleration in the space around it and can only account for the strength of the effect by assuming gravitons trillions of times "heavier" than general relativity predicts. Its not the first time someone thought superconductors were messing with gravity.

    submitted Thursday March 23 13:50PMEST

  19. Harvard researchers to patent optical media breakthrough
    Harvard researchers have used nanofabrication methods to join an antenna of optical wavelength dimensions directly to a laser to produce sub-wavelength focus control. Should enable any new applications. from the art.: "Eventually, we envision the laser integrated into new probes for biology like optical tweezers -- which can manipulate objects as small as a single atom," says Crozier. "It could also be used for integrated-circuit fabrication or to test impurities during the fabrication process itself. One day, consumers might be able to back up three terabytes data on one disk."

    submitted Weds Sept 6 2:40PMEST. Status: Rejected

  20. Paczkowski packs it in at GMSV
    I have no idea why the last time John Paczkowski's writing was mentioned in /. was back in 2001. His informative and often side-spliting snark was the backbone of the Good Morning Silicon Valley blog for the last seven years. But no more. Someone had to do for high tech and venture capital what Wonkette did for the petty and petting pols in our nation's capital. For the sake of my reading pleasure I hope they find a good replacement.

    submitted feb 3 2007

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