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Comments

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Mystery MLB Team Moves To Supercomputing For Their Moneyball Analysis

mutantSushi The Million Dollar Question (56 comments)

"Supercomputer, is baseball still boring as fuck?" "YES, DAVE."

about 4 months ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

mutantSushi Re:Common core manufactures them (509 comments)

None of current US Representatives or Senators were educated under "Common Core" standards, and I would hazard that a large number were educated in private schools to begin with. BTW, I believe the poster "amightywind" meant to refer to "collectivist", not "collectionist" state democrats. :-O ...Might want to back that claim up with comparative statistics for scientific literacy in Democratic vs. Republican controlled states....

about 4 months ago
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The Problem With Congress's Scientific Illiterates

mutantSushi Forest, not Trees (509 comments)

This article is just missing the point. There is nothing shocking that such people exist, or that some of them may even be elected to the national legislature. What is shocking is that they are crucial to the balance of power in that legislature. And that comes down not to them or their co-believers, but much broader aspects of American political structure. Normally one would expect the US House of Representatives to be MORE representative than the US Senate, as the Senate is all elected by the plurality winner takes all vote of entire states, while the House is elected by smaller numbers of citizens. That is in fact exactly the opposite of the case, with the US House of Representatives returning strong Republican majorities despite Democrats winning the popular vote in House races over-all. That is due to gerry-mandering of districts, which creates electoral 'ghettos' with super-concentration of support for one political party, which ends up being "wasted votes" (since having more than a majority or plurality in a district doesn't gain any more representation in Congress): In many states, one party needs from 1.2 to 1.6 times as many votes to get the same number of representatives in Congress, again reflecting the "wasted vote" phenomenon, even while the official paradigm is "one person one vote". Each state is allowed to re-district as it pleases, de facto according to the balance of power in that state), in other words tending to serve the majoritarian group in that state... i.e. exactly counter to the apparent purpose for having a larger number of more granular smaller-population districts vs. state-wide votes for Senators. Now one can expect Republican-majority states to gerrymander to their own favor, and Democrat-majority states to do likewise (and they both do so), but that doesn't account for all of the discrepancy. In fact there are 6 states that return Democratic majorities on Presidential votes, and over-all popular vote for House seats, yet return majority Republican House Representatives. One of these, Pennsylvania, in fact depended on Democratic votes in their State Congress to achieve the majority needed to confirm the gerrymandering. If you Google that topic, you will see the rationale given by those Democratic State Congressmen to be about as coherent as these Anti-Science Representatives quoted in the article. If ONLY those 6 states returned Representatives in line with their over-all popular vote, there would basically be a permanent US House Democratic majority. Not even all 6 of those states would be needed to switch in order to achieve that majority. Several of those states allow for citizen referendum, so there is no impediment to a popular referendum changing the representation/districting formula, yet that is not done. There is even the possibility to impose a nationwide change having consistent standards to avoid wasted votes, via Article V nationwide constitutional convention, whose requirements to convene have already been met, so such a Convention should go ahead to create Amendments which 3/4 of states then need to approve, by popular vote or their legislature. Yet that is not done. There are nutsos and science deniers all over the world. They are not the problem with the US' political system, the US' political system is the problem. So to blame this narrow sect of ignorants is absolving the larger body politic of it's responsibility for allowing such a system to persist. This system makes many votes simply not count in terms of final outcome, not to mention side-lining any parties outside the "2 parties of power". A system of Open-List Mixed Member Proportional Representation retains the link to local district which all members chosen because of their popularity in that district (either by plurality/majority, or as the highest level of support that party received), and can accomodate independent (non-party) local candidates and splitting support for parties at local and over-all levels (to avoid supporting a hated local candidate whose party over-all is attractive). The path is open to change that system, such a process is exactly allowed for in the US Constitution, and by using a national convention expressly called for the purpose, can side-line the 2-party representatives who are married to the existing system.

about 4 months ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

mutantSushi Re:Corporate Rent-Sucker Double Think (466 comments)

Well hopefully Brazil is investing in a good air-defense SAM network as well...

about 4 months ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

mutantSushi Corporate Rent-Sucker Double Think (466 comments)

[Net Neutrality is] not how the Internet, or telecommunication for that matter, has ever worked,' writes AT&T Senior Executive Vice President of Legislative Affairs, James Cicconi.

Last I checked, Netflix has never paid such fees before, nor has anybody else. I.e. net neutrality has being how it has always worked. This latest racket targetting Netflix happened just months after an FCC Net Neutrality rule was over-turned by courts on a technicality. I.e. said rule was in force previously, and ISPs were following said rule. Fuck these rent-sucking vampires. Does this sort of thing happen in non-US jurisiction at all? Or is this just the US' latest gift to the world after software patents?

about 4 months ago
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Alibaba Confirms Plans To Offer IPO In US

mutantSushi Re:The group's Board of Directors (93 comments)

The listing terms that the HKEx finds objectionable are centered around the proposed structure of the company, which would allow their 28 partners to control a majority of the board [reuters.com] - even though they only own around 13 percent of the company. Apparently, the HKEx regulators still cling to the quaint notion that small investors are important. I guess those HK guys have a thing or two left to learn about how real capitalism works.

Non-voting shares are pretty standard in public stock corporations world-wide. Indeed HKEx itself runs such schemes, namely it's OTC Clearing subsidiary: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Kong_Exchanges_and_Clearing#History

OTC Clearing Hong Kong Limited (OTC Clear) was incorporated as a subsidiary of HKEx in May 2012 for the purpose of acting as the clearing house for OTC derivatives in Hong Kong. Subsequently, HKEx, under the founding member programme, invited 12 financial institutions as founding members of OTC Clear, who in total hold 25 per cent of issued share capital in OTC Clear (in the form of non-voting ordinary shares) whilst HKEx holds the remaining 75 per cent. HKEx continues to hold 100 per cent of the voting ordinary shares of OTC Clear.

Many publicly traded companies listed in HK in fact have 75%+ of shares owned or controlled by one entity, which has the same net effect as non-voting shares, since such an ownership majority can impose it's will regardless. HKEx has intimated that their true concerns revolve around mainland Chinese court procedures not being amenable to minority shareholders, although if they want to push that, that kind of calls into question HKEx's entire raison d'etre. AFAIK, HK courts can still enforce transfers of shares themselves as judgements, and if HKEx is worried about things that go on outside of HK jurisdiction then most companies traded on HKEx shouldn't be listed there. Realistically, HKEx is known for allowing plenty of shady practices that make it a bourse of last resort, and maybe they decided to stand up here just so they have some pretense of respectability.

about 4 months ago
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Wikipedia Actively Battling PR Sockpuppets

mutantSushi Lawyer up! (166 comments)

The effective solution is suing these PR firms, who directed their employees to do things inherently violating Wiki's terms of service and which can be found liable for civil damages in degrading the quality of Wiki's product, which is supposed to follow the terms of service.

about 9 months ago
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Wikipedia Actively Battling PR Sockpuppets

mutantSushi Re:Wikimedia could copy StackOverflow's process (166 comments)

The outcome of that would be PR firms would just have their sockpuppets build up a history of 'good editing' so that their PR-shill edits will not be challenged. Alot of that can be done by automated means, e.g. scanning articles for generic grammar issues, minimal human input to verify it makes sense, and you can have a large number of 'good editing' events build up.

about 9 months ago
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GPS Spoofing With $3000 Worth of Equipment and a Laptop

mutantSushi Re:EXCEPT FOR THE RUDDER POSITION INDICATOR (180 comments)

Of course rudder position doesn't indicate heading, which is why I did'nt write that. But if GPS spoofing is to "take over navigation without pilot detection" and divert a ship or plane from it's straight line path, that means the rudder needs to turn to achieve that adjusted path... Which the pilots would be able to detect if an autopilot initiates it, and if they are not on autopilot, GPS spoofing alone cannot "take over navigation".

1 year,3 days
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GPS Spoofing With $3000 Worth of Equipment and a Laptop

mutantSushi EXCEPT FOR THE RUDDER POSITION INDICATOR (180 comments)

They can spoof the GPS position which plots on a navigational map, but if the ship is not moving in a straight line that means the rudder (or steerable propulsion pods) need to move, which have their own indicators. If the steering is locked to a wheel, the ship will not turn unless that wheel turns.

1 year,3 days
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EU To Ban Neonicotinoid Insecticides

mutantSushi Re:Out of the frying pan.... (219 comments)

Sure, but this isn't a permanent ban, it's a ban for two years only (IMHO 3 years would be better in order to get solid data analyzed from 2 years of results). As the article mentions, the country that is doing fine (Australia) doesn't have a mite problem, so for countries that do have a mite problem, it seems a valid question to assess whether nicotinoids (or any other potential cause/amplifier) play any role in causing or amplifying the syndrome. When mites can be satisfactorily repressed, then allowing a regime similar to Australia is reasonable, until then a different regime may be called for. I don't see what the article's comments about perfect apples are about, if there are no other effective, legal pesticides to spray, then there may not be 'perfect no mark, no bug apples' for the next 2-3 years if that is what it takes to assess neonicotinoids. If there are other options (nicotine!?), they may work. But neonicotinoids are not a natural feature, there is no inherent right to spread poisonous chemicals in the environment, so nobody should have any expectation of a right to the results of nicotinoid use. Mankind survived without neonicotioids, and with 'imperfect apples', so having a real scientific assessment of with/without neonicotinoids for 2-3 years probably won't mean the end of human civilization.

about a year ago
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EU To Ban Neonicotinoid Insecticides

mutantSushi Re:Oh, good (219 comments)

...And the topic of the thread is what is happening in the EU, not the US: In the EU corn syrup (high fructose or not) is not widely used as it is in the US, where it's widespread usage is largely due to agribusiness subsidies to corn farmers, without those and sugar tariffs there would be little reason to use (high fructose) corn syrup rather than other sources of sugar. High-fructose corn syrup (the sweetener of mass-market soft drinks in the US) is also linked to increased diabetes outcomes, even compared to normal sources of sugar (which also are, but to a lesser extent).

about a year ago
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"Choice Blindness" Can Transform Conservatives Into Liberals - and Vice Versa

mutantSushi Submission to Authority (542 comments)

So it seems the study basically is demonstrating that some people are more amenable to a symbol of authority telling them what they actually think/believe. Although the extent to which it is important that the authority is perceived to be 'neutral' isn't clear from the study.

about a year ago
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US Gov't Blocks Sales To Russian Supercomputer Maker

mutantSushi Re:US vs. Russia & China (116 comments)

This is about supercomputers used for scientific modelling, not servers for banks or infrastructure.

about a year ago
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Why Trolls Win With Toxic Comments

mutantSushi Re:Can't win, so why bother trying? (298 comments)

well, the Economist has an article about how reasonability or civility is exactly the succesful political trait in Sweden and 'Scandinavia'.

about a year ago
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Why Trolls Win With Toxic Comments

mutantSushi Re:Is polarization unwarranted? (298 comments)

uncivil comments polarizing viewers was not the primary point of the article/study. it's point was the comments expousing the exact same basic argument had different effect based on the writer's civility, and this was most strongly seen in viewers with weak personal views/familiarity on the subject to begin with, i.e. the vast majority of readers/ the general populace. this is contrasted with pre-internet norms of topical debate where uncivility was simply much less of a factor due to social constraints.

about a year ago
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Why Trolls Win With Toxic Comments

mutantSushi Re:F U (298 comments)

sure, but for any given semi-specialized subject, the vast majority of people don't care that much about it... and in a democratic (or mob-ocratic) system/structure, this is shifting what the SLIGHT preferences of this majority or near-majority is, which can change what the over-all majority opinion is.

about a year ago
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How Paid Apps On Firefox OS Will Work

mutantSushi Re:Not so fast (74 comments)

Good summary of the real motivations of the carriers with these 'alternate' OS's. Those who can use unlocked phones may benefit from the growth of alternate OS's using vanilla OS builds and independent apps stores... But what I don't get is how these alternate OS's really 'benefit' the network providers (with aspirations to be more than that): Android can already be used outside of Google's dictate, you simply can't use Google applications or Store. But if you use some other entirely different OS, you also are not using Google's Android apps, or it's Store... So what's the difference? (incidentally, I would say that loss of Google Map application is the biggest deal, Stores can be replicated)

about a year and a half ago
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Silicon Valley Before the Startup

mutantSushi Massive IP violation (57 comments)

"âoeEvery time we came up with a new idea we spawned two or three companies that would try to exploit it" I mean, doesn't this obvious violation of the holy IP rights monopoly lead to the destruction of western society and the end of all innovation? Oh whoops, it did the opposite in this case... Same as how when software patents didn't exist yet, and same as when wheels and axles couldn't be patented...

about a year and a half ago

Submissions

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Al Jazeera release archive with Creative Commons 3

mutantSushi mutantSushi writes  |  more than 5 years ago

mutantSushi (950662) writes "Al Jazeera Announces Launch of Free Footage under Creative Commons License

Doha Qatar — January 13, 2009: Al Jazeera Network today announced the world's first repository of broadcast quality video footage released under the 'Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution' license. Select Al Jazeera video footage — at this time footage of the War on Gaza — will be available for free to be downloaded, shared, remixed, subtitled and eventually by users and TV stations across the world with acknowledgement to Al Jazeera.

Al Jazeera will release its exclusive Arabic and English coverage produced by the Network's correspondents and crews in the Gaza Strip online at http://cc.aljazeera.net./ The ongoing war and crisis in Gaza, together with the scarcity of news footage available, make the repository a key resource for anyone producing content on the current situation.

This the first time that video footage produced by a news broadcaster is released under the 'Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution' license which allows for commercial and non-commercial use.

Mohamed Nanabhay who headed New Media at Al Jazeera and launched the project stated, "As one of the only international broadcasters in Gaza, our coverage of the war has been unsurpassed. The launch of Al Jazeera's Creative Commons Repository means that our Gaza footage will be made available under the most permissive Creative Commons license (CC-BY). With the flexibility of the license we expect to introduce our outstanding coverage to an even wider audience across the world. This means that news outlets, filmmakers and bloggers will be able to easily share, remix and reuse our footage."

Lawrence Lessig, the founder of Creative Commons organization and Professor of Law in Stanford University, stated, "Al Jazeera is teaching an important lesson about how free speech gets built and supported. By providing a free resource for the world, the network is encouraging wider debate, and a richer understanding".

Joichi Ito, CEO of Creative Commons and a world renowned Web 2.0 entrepreneur, added, "Video news footage is an essential part of modern journalism. Providing material under a Creative Commons license to allow commercial and amateur use is an enormous contribution to the global dialog around important events. Al Jazeera has set the example and the standard that we hope others will follow".

As a pioneer in news and media Al Jazeera is always looking for ways to make its unique content accessible to audiences across the world and the launch of Al Jazeera's Creative Commons Repository is another concrete step in this direction.

---ENDS--"

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