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Amnesty International Releases Tool To Combat Government Spyware

myowntrueself Re:Meh (94 comments)

Shame it doesn't work on Windows 8.1....

And the build dependencies gave me a lot of trouble when I tried to install it; the recommended packages don't work with one another, the extra python tools didn't even recognise that python was installed.

2 days ago
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US Gov't Seeks To Keep Megaupload Assets Because Kim Dotcom Is a Fugitive

myowntrueself Re:Other fugitives (164 comments)

Silly foreigner, only American citizens are human beings with rights.

I suggest that you go for a drive with $500 in cash in your car. When the police stop you and find this cash, explain this to them. (this assumes you are in the USA, of course)

2 days ago
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US Gov't Seeks To Keep Megaupload Assets Because Kim Dotcom Is a Fugitive

myowntrueself Re:Wait what? (164 comments)

Couple thoughts... first that people need to quit blaming police for asset forfeiture, and start blaming the people who elect politicians that passed the stupid laws - and the only ones that can revoke them.

Not really. Its not as if a cop who looks in your car and sees a wad of cash is faced with an obvious crime which he, as a cop, is obliged to act on. The cops are totally able to say "oh look, obvious drug money! *yoink*" or to ignore it.

They, the cops, choose to steal from you. In the USA.

2 days ago
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US Gov't Seeks To Keep Megaupload Assets Because Kim Dotcom Is a Fugitive

myowntrueself Re:Wait what? (164 comments)

Government needs to follow their own laws otherwise what's the whole point?

Government needs to be able to ignore its own laws and selectively apply them as is useful to do at the time. Thats a core function in government.

2 days ago
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US Gov't Seeks To Keep Megaupload Assets Because Kim Dotcom Is a Fugitive

myowntrueself Re:Wait what? (164 comments)

So, because he is exercising his rights as a foreign citizen living in another country and going through the legally established international process for determining extradition, he is a 'fugitive' and thus his assets are fair game?

This is theft, plain and simple, just like "civil" asset forfeiture.

The USA has no problem stealing from their own citizens in their own country, its hardly a surprise that they have no problem stealing from citizens of other countrys who are also overseas.

2 days ago
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Cameron Says People Radicalized By Free Speech; UK ISPs Agree To Censor Button

myowntrueself Re:How radical to be radicalized? (316 comments)

Uh...how radical does it have to be, before it's acceptable to hit the button? How radicalized is it acceptable to be? How radicalizable are the proles?

I'd hit the button for anything political or religious in nature. Just because I can.

about a week ago
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Cameron Says People Radicalized By Free Speech; UK ISPs Agree To Censor Button

myowntrueself Re:The UK doesn't have freedom of speech (316 comments)

I love how the Democratic Party invention of free speech zones somehow became a "Dubya" thing. They may have only become widely covered starting in 2000, but they were originally an invention of the DNC to keep pro-life protestors away from their 1988 convention.

Both parties have been using them since the 2004 elections, so it's not like you can lay the blame solely on the Republicans either. Both parties do it.

The UK has had 'free speech zones' for decades, its called 'Hyde Park Speaker's Corner'.

about a week ago
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Department of Justice Harvests Cell Phone Data Using Planes

myowntrueself Re:About time for a Free baseband processor (201 comments)

a well regulated militia was the PEOPLE. That means the people have a right to bear arms....
And well regulated means registering with the government so it knows who has a gun so they can be called upon it times of invasion or insurrection.

No, it does not. It means "well trained".

No, it didn't. It meant that the guns had been properly tested.

about a week ago
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PC Cooling Specialist Zalman Goes Bankrupt Due To Fraud

myowntrueself Re:3 billion on a fan company? (208 comments)

don't get me wrong, i love their fans... but come on, it's a fan.
those exec and investors are dreaming if you think that market is that large.

Its not just fans, they also make pretty good heatsinks. A lot of those heatsinks are pure copper. So Zalman must get through quite a lot of the stuff and it isn't cheap.

For example, I used to have a dual CPU machine with two large Zalman pure copper heatsinks, the sort that are really big and have fins in a fan-out arrangement. In total there was about half a kilo of copper hanging off of that motherboard. They didn't even need fans on them, just the case fan was enough.

Manufacturing this shit must involve having a lot of copper stock.

about two weeks ago
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PC Cooling Specialist Zalman Goes Bankrupt Due To Fraud

myowntrueself Re:Uncool (208 comments)

I am familiar with US / western bankruptcy law. This is Korea so your mileage will vary.

Well its Korea so it'll involve having a big meeting with everyone; the people at the top can't make a decision without consulting with everyone all the way down to the janitors.

Then they will all get very very VERY drunk.

about two weeks ago
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New GCHQ Chief Says Social Media Aids Terrorists

myowntrueself Re:Social media (228 comments)

The UK has already banned any information which might be useful to a terrorist. Literally, thats what the law says.

about three weeks ago
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New GCHQ Chief Says Social Media Aids Terrorists

myowntrueself Re:Not a win (228 comments)

First off, being a Muslim has nothing to do with screaming, crying, and arresting as soon as they express a view we don't like.

Muslim is a religious choice, and just like Christians or any other religion, there are those who are fanatical about it. They are dangerous, remember the holy crusades?

There are people who are fanatical who have nothing to do with religion at all, what group do you insult for them?
There's plenty of Muslims who live in Canada who are perfectly reasonable respectable people who are not violent who appreciate that you have your own way you live your life, and aren't coming to you to force you to change it, and just want to be respected for their way of life like any other religion.

For many many people being Muslim is NOT a choice; they are born into it. When they reach an age where they are rational enough to be able to decide whether they really want to be Muslim or not they are faced with the option of leaving Islam and being an apostate. The Koran specifies the death sentence for this 'crime'.

So no, unless you are a convert theres no real choice there.

about three weeks ago
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Virginia Court: LEOs Can Force You To Provide Fingerprint To Unlock Your Phone

myowntrueself Re:don't use biometrics (328 comments)

The Judge isn't the trier of fact in our legal system, that's the role of the Petit Jury, but why bother to actually learn how it works when you can just spread FUD?

Judges can also issue rulings notwithstanding the jury's recommendation, as they do when they feel the jury SHOULD have reached a particular verdict, but didn't, when it seems likely the jury is performing nullification of a law. (I believe it's called non obstante verdicto.)

For example, a person is tried for possession of a pound of marijuana with intent to distribute, and the defense claims it was his own personal supply. The prosecution has a slam-dunk, has the defendant dead-to-rights, and the defense argues that marijuana shouldn't be illegal.

The jury returns a verdict of not-guilty, even after the judge instructed the defense counsel that they COULD NOT LEGALLY USE THAT DEFENSE, and the defense replied that the defense rests. The judge has the power to disregard the jury's incorrect, (even if morally right,) decision because it's legally wrong. I can't say how often that happens off the top of my head, as IINAL, but the guy who told me this IAL,... so for whatever it's worth...

They used to have a saying: it's not enough to hire an attorney; for best results, also spring for a jury.

Jury nullification might not be illegal but it'll get you into a lot of trouble in the USA.

about three weeks ago
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Virginia Court: LEOs Can Force You To Provide Fingerprint To Unlock Your Phone

myowntrueself Re:don't use biometrics (328 comments)

lewd exhibition of the genitals.

So basically, if it gives the judge an erection you are in big trouble.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

myowntrueself Re: It freakin' works fine (928 comments)

I have used Linux for 15 years without any problems.

I've used Linux since the kernel versions started with a 0.

If you haven't had any problems you aren't trying hard enough.

about three weeks ago
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Is the Outrage Over the FBI's Seattle Times Tactics a Knee-Jerk Reaction?

myowntrueself Re:Did they have a warrant? (206 comments)

If they had a warrant, then it is perfectly good police tactics.

If they did not have a warrant, then it is an illegal invasion of privacy.

They electronically entered his computer and that is no different than entering his home. The fact that he had to click on it is meaningless. The creation of the malware would be illegal, without the warrant.

Now, the police may not be smart enough (or ethical enough) to have asked for the warrant, but that is what is clearly needed.

The USA government is really no better than an organised crime syndicate. They steal cash from ordinary citizens in the guise of 'war on drugs' ("you have $400 in cash? Thats OBVIOUSLY drug money").

A warrant in that environment is worth NOTHING in terms of real legitimacy. It may make it legal but when your government is a bunch of robber-barons legality does not create legitimacy.

about three weeks ago
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Law Lets IRS Seize Accounts On Suspicion, No Crime Required

myowntrueself Re:and they use cash businesses as examples (424 comments)

the cops will need a search warrant to enter the house. that takes some evidence and can be contested by the worst legal aid lawyers. this is why they are seizing from banks accounts, faster, easier, no warrant, very little legal oversight and the burden of the cost and time of getting money back is on the person who lost the money

I think its mostly from cars. They pull someone over, intimidate them into letting them search the car, find cash and declare it drug money.

about a month ago
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Law Lets IRS Seize Accounts On Suspicion, No Crime Required

myowntrueself Re:Time for a revolution (424 comments)

I agree. Close your bank accounts, use check cashing services and pay everything with cash or money orders.
Done by enough people, loudly enough, would be incentive to get stodgy steak-fed Congress-clowns to fix their blunder.
Likely? No. But , I can see there will be outcry if they abuse this law publicly enough. More stupid bullshit from the "superior" overlords we elected. Wait! You elected them! I didn't vote for any Repubmocrats! You did!
You Goddamn fix it! You made the mess, now clean it up! And quit voting for the one-party system or quit complaining about the current government.

And when you are on your way to buy a new washing machine, or something equally innocent, and you have your $400 in cash, the police pull you over, intimidate you into letting them search you and when they find the wad of cash its 'obviously drug money', you lose the cash and are warned that if you complain you'll lose the car too. And yes they will do this for as little as $400, its worth their while. (assuming you are in the USA where this kind of thing is the new normal).

about a month ago
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

myowntrueself Re:May I suggest (334 comments)

How about a modern .308 bolt-action rifle with a synthetic stock? The caliber is more than adequate; the stock won't be affected by the elements; and a bolt-action is very reliable. It's extremely simple and easy to keep clean. Almost any brand will do.

Yes, of course. Because of the shortage of wood in Canada right?

about a month ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

myowntrueself Re:Good to hear (522 comments)

I was really unhappy with Debian's move to systemd, and the fact that once systemd is running as one's init system through a general upgrade, one cannot even go back to sysvinit..

Having heard that Slackware was resistant to systemd, I installed the latest version of Slackware on a netbook I have lying around, and while it's a fine project that clearly has its fans, it seems to require a lot of retraining for someone coming from Debian. I'd love to be able to stay on the venerable old Linux distro I have so many years of experience in.

I predict that use of systemd will result in too many 'release critical' bugs, and that future releases will be delayed very badly because of this.

about a month ago

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