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Debunking a Viral Internet Post About Breastfeeding Racism

myrdos2 Can't draw conclusions from this study (350 comments)

"For such a small sample, that's not enough to definitively say whether the small difference is due to random chance, or due to small differences in opinion in the population being surveyed."

Then you haven't shown anything. Without statistically significant data, your survey is meaningless.

"What it does show, even with such a small sample, is that in the underlying population there's almost certainly no huge gap between people's opinions of black women vs. white women breastfeeding in photos."

No, it doesn't. You cannot draw conclusions from your results without significant data, because as you just said, your results could be due to random chance. I see this all the time in papers submitted for peer review. They'll say something like, "our technique showed benefit over the other techniques, even though the difference was not significant", and try to claim this as a win.

about a week ago
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Interviews: Ask CMI Director Alex King About Rare Earth Mineral Supplies

myrdos2 Long Term Supply (62 comments)

I've often wondered what fate awaits humanity. Will our technology gradually regress as the supply of rare earth minerals dwindles? There's a finite amount of economically recoverable reserves, and no recycling program is perfect. As the centuries roll by I imagine the minerals being gradually spread out in deposits that aren't economical to harvest - say as a thin film of rust at the bottom of the ocean, or in tiny pieces in long forgotten garbage heaps.

Or is it possible that we could continue having access to rare earths more-or-less forever?

about two weeks ago
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Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

myrdos2 Re:And this is why Linux will never win the deskto (555 comments)

My Linus just worked right out of the box. You have to get past the F--- You! if you have NVidia graphics, and the prickly user interface that periodically tells you you're a moron.

At least it's better than my Stallman. That thing ate something off the bottom of it's foot while I was giving a presentation. Yechh.

about 1 month ago
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Lost Sense of Smell Is a Strong Predictor of Death Within 5 Years

myrdos2 Re:Oh my god, I would have been dead at 5-10 yo (139 comments)

I either NEVER had a sense of smell, or at least not since I was 5 years old. So I should have died over 25 years ago.

Not if you read the article - it says the that the olfactory nerves are continually regenerated, so if your body stops being able to regenerate itself you will lose your sense of smell first. It doesn't say anything about losing your sense of smell because of other reasons.

about a month and a half ago
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To prepare for a coronal mass ejection, I ...

myrdos2 Backup My Data (151 comments)

I don't actually prepare for coronal mass ejections, but backing up data just always makes sense.

In fact, I think I'll go back it up right now.

about 2 months ago
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Is It Time To Split Linux Distros In Two?

myrdos2 Keep em together (282 comments)

I've always been impressed with how rock-solid, and well, server-like the Debian desktop has been. I wouldn't want to give that up - it's simple, it's clean, it's ultra-reliable. If I want to run a website or allow remote access, there's really not that much to learn. Compare that to the complexity of Windows server.

Is this split actually a valid suggestion, or more anti-systemd rhetoric? If there was no such thing as systemd, would you even care about splitting?

about 2 months ago
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Reno Selected For Tesla Motors Battery Factory

myrdos2 Re:Another building full of robots? (157 comments)

I think we're on different wavelengths, since I actually agree with what you say.

What I'm trying to do is refute the Broken Window Fallacy, which says that if you go around breaking windows you'll benefit the economy, by creating jobs fixing windows. But what you've done is made owning windows more expensive, since they periodically need to be replaced. And the standard of living drops a little, because you're wasting resources fixing windows that you could be using for something else.

Making a window factory more efficient is the same as not breaking windows. You've reduced the resources needed to own a window. The window fixers will complain that you're hurting the economy, by removing window-fixing jobs. But people will have additional resources that they can spend on something useful. This might be bigger windows, but it could be better healthcare, police, etc.

The only way for jobs to actually be lost is if people started working fewer hours, because they are free of their window-fixing burden. But, I can't see that happening in response to Tesla's robotic factory?

Whither now your broken economic system that requires unlimited growth?

I didn't say it was a good or sustainable system.

about 3 months ago
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Reno Selected For Tesla Motors Battery Factory

myrdos2 Re:Another building full of robots? (157 comments)

This next wave of automation is going to put a real crimp on the middle class that it can't easily absorb.

I often see this argument, and always disagree. Technology has, I believe, reduced the number of farmers from 66% of the population down to 4%. And yet, 62% of the population isn't out of work. Ditto for factories that mass-produce items, making them much more quickly and efficiently than a craftsman could do by hand. What happened is we started buying more stuff. We weren't content with 1900s levels of living, we wanted more. (And probably always will.)

If one man can do the work of five men, it doesn't mean four of them will be out of work. It means we'll buy five times more stuff with the same money, and the environment or any other consequences be damned!

about 3 months ago
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Fermilab Begins Testing Holographic Universe Theory

myrdos2 Re:Much Confusion (247 comments)

Crackpot mode activated!

Does that mean that the "computer" running our hologram might in fact be a black hole? A black hole whose mass is equal to the mass of the Universe. I understand that black holes spin very rapidly, causing the singularity to expand into a disk... might that be why galaxies are flying apart from each other, rather than collapsing together due to gravity?

I mean, if the black hole were not spinning, and dark energy was indeed switched off, then the Universe would eventually contract into an equally massive black hole. At which point, there would be nothing to distinguish the 'inner' black hole from the 'outer' one, they'd be the same singularity.

Sadly, this is probably a gross over-simplification.

about 3 months ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

myrdos2 Re:It's job security (826 comments)

but int computer-land

Ah, I see you're a programmer. Damn that muscle memory!

about 3 months ago
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Lots Of People Really Want Slideout-Keyboard Phones: Where Are They?

myrdos2 Re:Where are the buggy whip dealers? (544 comments)

His sample size isn't necessary too small - I've seen plenty of papers with statistical significance at 12 to 20 participants. No, his problem is more likely self-selection bias. That is, people who are frustrated with the lack of slide-out phones may be much more likely to respond to the survey.

about 4 months ago
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Switching From Microsoft Office To LibreOffice Saves Toulouse 1 Million Euros

myrdos2 Re:The real question (296 comments)

In my experience, the opposite tends to be true. You initially get the cost of deploying a new platform and training users, then the savings kick in over the long term.

about 4 months ago
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More Forgotten Vials of Deadly Diseases Discovered

myrdos2 Re:Homeland Security (55 comments)

They probably want to know if there was actually a flaw in their handling procedures, and if it has since been corrected.

about 4 months ago
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KDE Releases Plasma 5

myrdos2 Re:Love KDE!! (108 comments)

I'm waiting for a stable release.

about 4 months ago
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Marvel's New Thor Will Be a Woman

myrdos2 Re:Ridiculous! (590 comments)

I'm still waiting for the female Hulk. Also, the fat Jesus kind of offsets the two skinny ones.

about 4 months ago
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Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Ban On Affirmative Action In College Admissions

myrdos2 Re:Not really needed anymore. (410 comments)

I'll see your argument and raise you one George W. Bush.

about 7 months ago

Submissions

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German Military Braces for Peak Oil

myrdos2 myrdos2 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

myrdos2 (989497) writes "A study by a German military think tank leaked to the Internet warns of the potential for a dire global economic crisis in as little as 15 years as a result of a peak and an irreversible decline in world oil supplies. The study states that there is "some probability that peak oil will occur around the year 2010 and that the impact on security is expected to be felt 15 to 30 years later. ... In the medium term the global economic system and every market-oriented national economy would collapse". The report closely matches one from the US military earlier this year, which stated that surplus oil production capacity could disappear within two years and there could be serious shortages by 2015 with a significant economic and political impact."
Link to Original Source
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Chemical Pollution Destroying Masculinity

myrdos2 myrdos2 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

myrdos2 writes "A host of common chemicals is feminising males of every class of vertebrate animals, from fish to mammals, including people. Many have been identified as "endocrine disrupters" or gender-benders because they interfere with hormones. Communities heavily polluted with gender-benders in Canada, Russia and Italy have given birth to twice as many girls than boys, which may offer a clue to the reason for a mysterious shift in sex ratios worldwide. And a study at Rotterdam's Erasmus University showed that boys whose mothers had been exposed to PCBs grew up wanting to play with dolls and tea sets rather than with traditionally male toys. It also follows hard on the heels of new American research which shows that baby boys born to women exposed to widespread chemicals in pregnancy are born with smaller penises and feminised genitals. It is calculated that 250,000 babies who would have been boys have been born as girls instead in the US and Japan alone. And sperm counts are dropping precipitously. Studies in more than 20 countries have shown that they have dropped from 150 million per millilitre of sperm fluid to 60 million over 50 years."

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