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Which Cars Get the Most Traffic Tickets?

nabsltd Re:Study is quite incomplete (171 comments)

A small family sedan that hasn't been made since 1994 still hits #7 in getting the most tickets? It's the Mercury version of the Ford Tempo, which didn't make the top 20 at all. And I'd be willing to bet Ford sold a lot more Tempos than they did Topazs...

The data just says that of all Mercury Topaz's included in the report (and at least 50 must have been used to generate a quote for the model to appear at all), 28.8% have been ticketed at least once. The list is then sorted by the percentage. You can see the obvious flaws.

First, if a single Corvette received 100 tickets last year, it still just counts as "ticketed once". Second, if 10,000 Tempo's were given quotes, while only 50 Topaz's were, every Topaz influences the results 200 times as much as a Tempo. Third, miles driven isn't taken into account.

A much better way to report this data is by total tickets for a model per mile driven. This eliminates both the "ticketed once" issue as well as the "sample size" issue. It also would help show trends like a Ferrari that is only driven on weekends might get far more tickets per mile driven than a sedan.

1 hour ago
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2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

nabsltd Re:Simple fix. (269 comments)

That doesn't narrow things down a lot.

I was trying to point out that 4 years ago this month (when I bought my "2011"), many of the features from the new Corvette were already available.

I have no idea exactly which models have the same feature, but this shows the Focus had it the model year before (in a more limited feature set), so the answer would be "pretty much every Ford had it back then".

yesterday
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FCC Rejects Blackout Rules

nabsltd Re:What about baseball? (129 comments)

Major League Baseball has one of the most draconian and bizarre blackout policies even conceived

There's nothing bizarre about it...MLB wants you to watch games on the network that pays them the most money. In order from most to least:

  1. You must watch a "national network" (Fox, ESPN, TBS, etc.) if it is carrying the game.
  2. You must watch your local regional sports network, if it is carrying the game.
  3. You must watch a local OTA channel, if it is carrying the game. Note that some regional sports networks partner with local stations for some games, and either channel is then considered to be the RSN.
  4. You must watch on an out-of-town RSN or MLB.tv., assuming you have paid for one of these packages.

This order is what makes the MLB blackouts so draconian (as you point out). It means that what the end viewer most directly paid for has the least priority for being watched by them.

yesterday
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FCC Rejects Blackout Rules

nabsltd Re:Online Sports Network (129 comments)

You can watch MLB, NHL, or NBA, if you don't mind paying for it.

I suspect that all of these sports have the same rules (which I know MLB has) that you cannot watch your local team live over the Internet...you must watch them on local TV (either OTA or the regional sports network).

Note that this means that if you live in Chicago and buy the MLB.tv package because you are a fan of the Cleveland Indians, you will not be able to watch over the Internet when Cleveland visits either Chicago team, or vice-versa. In some years, that would mean that out of 162 games, as many as 25 will not be available to you.

yesterday
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Microsoft's Asimov System To Monitor Users' Machines In Real Time

nabsltd Re:Start menu usage dropped in lieu of what? (260 comments)

They clicked "Start" then started typing "wor"... and hit enter.

Presto. MS Word.

On my system, "Microsoft SharePoint Workspace 2010" is the first option offered with just those three characters. Since I have never used that app, it's not about frequency or recent apps, it's about having the entire MS Office suite force-installed by group policy.

"word" does get Microsoft Word listed first, but I'm old-school and often still type "winword".

yesterday
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

nabsltd Re:Android version req - long time coming (405 comments)

You also don't need to update them if you don't use them - go to Settings, Apps, go through all Google apps that you don't use and [Uninstall Updates] followed by [Disable] on each one of them. You need to disable automatic app updates as well, otherwise the apps will get updated and will occupy the Internal Memory (FLASH).

On later versions of Android, you can just "Disable" and the system will also uninstall updates for you. In addition, "Disabled" apps aren't updated automatically, even if automatic updates are turned on.

2 days ago
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2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

nabsltd Re:Simple fix. (269 comments)

Perhaps a better solution would be a 'valet key' that when used limits access to the boot, reduces acceleration (like the Eco mode you get on lots of modern cars and limits speed to say 60mph),

Except for the recording part, my car has exactly that feature. I can program keys that limit the maximum speed, radio volume, etc. It's a 2011 Ford.

5 days ago
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2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

nabsltd Re:huh? (269 comments)

Obviously that scenario would not be legal, but putting cameras in your house to see what the babysitter is doing or to see if anyone breaks in is perfectly legal.

Actually, it's a tough call on the legality, because in theory the guest could change clothes in any "private" room in the house.

If the only other person in the house is a baby in a crib, and I change clothes in a bedroom, then is capturing video of me "illegal", while if I merely enter the bedroom and walk around, the capture is "legal"?

5 days ago
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The Great Lightbulb Conspiracy

nabsltd Re:I dunno about LEDs, but CFLs don't last (595 comments)

But higher wattage CFLs I've used in the garage don't last very long.

CFLs seem to be much more sensitive to climate than incandescent bulbs (or even tubes, as you noted).

I have some 300W equivalent 6500K CFLs that I use for photography, and they have done fine even with being used in varying climates, but always stored in controlled conditions.

5 days ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

nabsltd Re:Oh good (903 comments)

I've never seen car loans at rates lower than or even close to inflation, for buyers without excellent credit ratings, and frequently large down payments.

My current car was purchased in October 2010 with less than $5K down on a $40K vehicle with a 5-year 1.9% loan. That's not a "large down payment", since most of it was trade-in. I might have "excellent credit", but I don't really know, as I really only use it for infrequent car and home purchases. I have credit cards, but they all get paid off each month.

For me, the advantage of a new car is the lack of unexpected expenses. I added 4 years to the manufacturer's warranty for $750 (rolled into the $40K), so for 7 years, I have bumper-to-bumper coverage. My dealer gives me essentially free oil changes and tire rotations for life (4 per year limit, which is more than I use), and the other standard maintenance costs aren't unreasonable. I've spent far more money repairing damage caused by a squirrel that shredded the heat guard inside the hood than on maintenance. So, yeah, I have a fairly large payment for 5 years, then 2 years of pretty much nothing where I stuff the car payment into savings, then about 3-5 years of having to pay for some repairs before I buy a new car.

Overall, I think buying a new car every 10 years or so makes better sense than getting a used car every 2-3 years, especially if you want the used car to have the same sort of feature set as the new car. If you are buying beaters, then you'll save a lot of money, but you'll also have a lot more uncertainty about whether your car will start when you want it to.

5 days ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

nabsltd Re:Oh good (903 comments)

It might be possible to bypass it, but blocking the signal isn't the solution. He parked his car in an underground garage, and when he came back it wouldn't start. Turns out if the disabler hasn't received a ping in a certain elapsed time it also disables the starter.

I think a DDoS by anonymous on the servers that send the ping is in the works some time in the future. That would result in literally millions of cars (based on the percentages in TFA) being disabled.

I can understand a "kill switch" as a tool to encourage on-time payments, but not a dead-man's switch. With that sort of design, just about any problem with any part of the system would result in cars that won't run.

5 days ago
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Remote Exploit Vulnerability Found In Bash

nabsltd Re:Exploit depends on not validating input? (399 comments)

Does your home router have any cgi scripts that use bash?

Even if it did, it only serves web pages to IPs on the "LAN" side, right?

If not, you've already been pwned long ago.

about a week ago
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Outlining Thin Linux

nabsltd Re:Good response to the Systemd fight... (221 comments)

It doesn't need to know about the underlaying stuff, but it's not that uncommon to publish new LUN to some server (like when you add more local storage and create new array or when you assign more space from your SAN).

Which, as I said, is managed quite nicely by the device node manager, and the init system doesn't need to know anything about it.

about a week ago
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Outlining Thin Linux

nabsltd Re:min install (221 comments)

What packages are you talking about?

Everything that exists to deal with things that happen because an inexperienced GUI user might do something stupid (like manually change the system time).

Last I used systemd (Fedora), the dependency tree for packages is such that packages like NetworkManager are required by systemd. Do a minimal CentOS 7 install and see just how many packages you can remove from the system without having systemd be removed because of dependencies. Then, look at the list of remaining packages and you'd have to be a complete liar to tell us that none of them are GUI-centric.

about a week ago
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Outlining Thin Linux

nabsltd Re:CoreOS uses systemd (221 comments)

It seems to me that the opposite is happening, cloud ready distros are choosing systemd.

Not really...they're choosing all the extras that systemd requires to be installed.

I don't think people would have a problem with systemd if it didn't replace init, cron, syslog, autofs, ntp, etc., and require you to run its version of those demons. If systemd had more separation of packages where you could use any syslog-like program that had certain features, there would be a lot less backlash.

about a week ago
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Outlining Thin Linux

nabsltd Re:Good response to the Systemd fight... (221 comments)

Servers in general do need hotplug (for example, a RAID array of hot swappable hard drives)

With hardware RAID, the OS doesn't know anything about drives being added or removed from the array, and most real production servers use some sort of hardware RAID.

That being said, all the various device node managers (udev, eudev, mdev, smdev) by themselves handle hotplug just fine. The init system doesn't need to know anything about hotplug. If you want to run a particular program on hotplug, configure your device manager to do that. And, if you want to run that program using some of the features that systemd's init portion provides (CPU limits, etc.), that's fine, too...the udev rules file can just start a "system service" on hotplug. That's all the integration needed between init and hotplug.

about a week ago
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Outlining Thin Linux

nabsltd Re:min install (221 comments)

Try a CentOS 7 minimal install, does not even have ifconfig, lspci or a bunch of other what I would consider basic stuff.

But, with systemd dragging in a bunch of packages that many would consider to be only truly useful when a GUI is installed, the actual footprint is probably larger.

On that same note, perhaps there is a "systemd way" to do what you are trying to do with ifconfig or lspci?

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is iOS 8 a Pig?

nabsltd Re: Alright smart guy (504 comments)

Because the difference in the monthly fee between a SIM only plan and a plan with a subsidised phone adds up to much more than the subsidy on the phone.

None of this applies to the US. US Carriers that subsidize phones charge the same rates for non-"pay as you go" plans regardless of how you acquired the phone. US carriers that don't subsidize phones just add the price of the phone divided by some number of months to your monthly bill.

about two weeks ago
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Slashdot Asks: What's In Your Home Datacenter?

nabsltd Re:Small setup (286 comments)

I get a solid 110-115MB/s, but I have SSDs.

I have just started to build out my 10Gbps backbone at home, and get over 380MB/sec on disk transfers (RAID arrays on both ends). I've got some major tuning to do, though, as I only see about 600MB/sec on the network level. I'd like to get that up to about 900MB/sec. I have switches at several places in the house that give me 1Gbps wired to most rooms. One bedroom gets wired connectivity from DirecTV cabling, and there are two WiFi access points for various portable devices.

Otherwise, I have a CentOS box serving as an iSCSI SAN (14TB) for 3 ESX hosts. I also have a separate file server (9TB), and several user workstations (desktops and laptops).

The only hardware I use that is designed to be rack mounted is the networking gear, because most rack-mount servers are too loud.

about two weeks ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

nabsltd Re:So-to-speak legal (418 comments)

When I said "cable companies", I was referring to their ISP portions.

And those still aren't common carriers. No ISP is. That's the whole reason they are complaining about the FCC thinking of reclassifying them under Title II, which would make them common carriers.

about two weeks ago

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