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Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

narcc Re:GO GO POWER RANGERS! (373 comments)

To be honest, I'm not sure which one I'd trust more with that power...

2 days ago
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French Cabbies Say They'll Block Paris Roads On Monday Over Uber

narcc Re:Why are taxi drivers all so horrible? (295 comments)

You're trying to impose precision where none exists. I can certainly understand the impulse, but you'll save yourself a whole lot of trouble if you just accept the simple fact that language is naturally messy and imprecise.

If you can't, then at least just let this one go. It's really not worth the effort. What could you possibly hope to achieve?

4 days ago
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Dad Makes His Kid Play Through All Video Game History In Chronological Order

narcc Re:In summary... (222 comments)

Assuming you are religious, and you do sound so - you are automatically anti-all other religions in the world.

LOL, no. That's, quite possibly, the stupidest thing I'll read on Slashdot this week. Where did you come up with that nonsense?

about a week ago
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A Common Logic To Seeing Cats and the Cosmos

narcc Re:Slashdot (45 comments)

We know better than to get excited about silly nonsense like this.

about two weeks ago
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Why Apple, Google, and FB Have Their Own Programming Languages

narcc Re:interesting points, link (161 comments)

Otherwise, where you have a choice, JavaScript is NORMALLY not the best suited for any role other than client side web page code. Exceptions may exist.

That's a bit more reasonable. Though I wonder why you limit its utility like that? Is there something intrinsic to the language that makes you think it's less suitable than, for example, Python in situations where that language is well-suited? For clarity: JS can't replace PHP where it works well for reasons independent of the languages themselves (that's in the differences between node.js and mod_php), yet JS obviously can't compete with C where C shines, for obvious reasons directly related to the languages.

about two weeks ago
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Why Apple, Google, and FB Have Their Own Programming Languages

narcc Re:iow no, not one counter-example (161 comments)

It's the ONLY choice for client-side web. As I said twice before, that's the one place nothing is worse or better - because you have no other choice.

You seem to forget that, for many years, it was not the only choice. JS handily beat the competition. You may be too young to remember those early days, so I won't hold it against you.

Since neither iOS nor most Android devices run Java applets, that means MOST users today won't run them. A "solution" that won't run at all for most users isn't a solution. You can't say "Java and JavaScript would both work, but JavaScript would be better".

Again, you forget your history. Java in the browser was effectively dead long before iOS and Android hit the scene. It lost out for a reason, after all. Java had its chance, there was more than a little excitement surrounding it, and it still failed miserably.

If you're advocating JavaScript as a server-side language, well that's just silly.

I'm not advocating anything, just calling out your opinion as unsupported and uninformed. (You've never explained your reasoning. I assume that's because there is none and your just repeating a meme.) Still, you'll find that JS on the server is getting quite popular. Even sites like PayPal have adopted it. Call me crazy, but I'm pretty sure they're well-aware of the alternatives and selected JS anyway.

If a key component of the language behaves in unintuitive, surprising, and troublesome ways, that's a valid criticism.

In the case of this, it's only surprising if you know absolutely nothing about the language. If it behaved the same was that it does in a language like Java, it wouldn't make any sense at all. Once you understand the basics of the language, it behaves exactly as you would expect. As I said before, that criticism stems from pure, unadulterated, ignorance. For whatever reason, people seem to think that they don't need to learn the language before using it -- even though it's dramatically different from other languages.

about two weeks ago
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Chinese Government Moves To Crack Down On Puns

narcc Re:It's a reference to an obscenity (156 comments)

Another fun pun, is that the word for "grandmother" is the same as the word for "boobs".

... I'd love to know how that happened ...

about two weeks ago
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Why Apple, Google, and FB Have Their Own Programming Languages

narcc Re:counter-example? (161 comments)

Where other options exist, the others are probably better suited to the task.

I can't imagine what you'd think is better. Other languages have adopted features like first-class functions and closures as a direct result of influence from JavaScript. What does that indicate to you?

Taking it further, the prototypal approach to OO that JS uses is, without question, superior to the classical approach. As there are vanishingly few examples of other languages that use prototypes instead of classes, just about any language you can offer as a substitute would be, necessarily, inferior. (A simple example for you, repeating a popular meme: Today, the 'best practice' is to favor composition over inheritance. JS naturally lends itself to composition; unlike Java, C#, and similar languages. Alternately: If you're a fan of the GoF book, for some reason, you'll immediately notice that many of the patterns described there are unnecessary in JS.)

To cement the point, the feature of the language most criticized (its type system) is uniquely well-suited to its intended purpose, making it exceptionally well-fit for the web. (Other popular criticisms stem from pure, unadulterated, ignorance: The behavior of this, for example.)

See, what you've done is adopt a popular (on slashdot anyway) opinion of a language that you don't understand. That makes you feel good when you're praised for making vague criticisms (like the one above) and validated when you read (equally uninformed) posts from others.

I'm curious what solutions could be worse than JavaScript.

Java and Python would be examples of popular languages that would clearly be worse than JS on the web, each for different reasons.

about two weeks ago
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Why Apple, Google, and FB Have Their Own Programming Languages

narcc Re:Why? (161 comments)

Careful. On this site, that's flamebait. So is this:

The reason we use programming languages is to make it easier to write programs. A good programming language, then, can be judged on how much easier it is to use than other languages. What does that tell us about BASIC?

about two weeks ago
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Why Apple, Google, and FB Have Their Own Programming Languages

narcc Re:hammer, screwdriver, saw, nail gun (161 comments)

generally there is one condition that decides whether JavaScript is the best choice . JS is the best choice if and only if that's the only possible option.

This opinion sounds uninformed.

about two weeks ago
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Which Programming Language Pays the Best? Probably Python

narcc Re:Problem domain, not language (277 comments)

To add to your point: You can also justify using the terms "clean" and "easy" to describe Forth.

about two weeks ago
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Fraudulent Apps Found In Apple's Store

narcc Re:This is news.... because? (89 comments)

How do we know that there are only 2 lameware apps? (Ignoring the fact that the article mentions 3 apps.)

That's "2" that a part-time columnist on a deadline found without much effort. I suspect that the actual number is significantly higher...

about two weeks ago
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Which Programming Language Pays the Best? Probably Python

narcc Re:Why program in Python (277 comments)

Not with vague criteria like 'popular', which can mean whatever you feel best suits your interests. I can, however, point out numerous languages with far fewer problems with backward compatibility than Python. For fun, I'll use only languages that you're likely to despise: VBA, PHP, JavaScript, and Perl (even the infamous Perl 6 is slated to have a compatibility mode for Perl 5 code), just to name a few.

In each of those examples, you'll find that most, if not all, untouched 10-year-old code works in the latest releases. (Yes, even PHP, which has been known to give users a decade or more to deal with depreciated features.)

about two weeks ago
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Which Programming Language Pays the Best? Probably Python

narcc Re:Why program in Python (277 comments)

Hands down it can do everything perl can do - while providing clear, readable code that is consistent from one developer to the next.

My experience is different. Dramatically different, actually. I've seen very few examples of readable python, and very little consistency between developers.

I suppose you're referring to the controversial the white space rules? The killer-feature that can be replicated for any sensible language with a keystroke in virtually every editor? Or, if you prefer: The reason that anonymous functions in Python are crippled?

I'd even go as far as to say it's white space rules make Python code significantly more difficult to read, as you can't clearly see where blocks begin and end, particularly when the indentation level changes by more than one, which happens quite frequently.

I debugged my last hanging curly brace/missing semicolon long ago.

I'll bet it was easier than hunting down the invisible bugs from mixed tabs/spaces or introduced by your editor mangling indentation while moving bits of code around. You know, problems you're actually likely to encounter when using Python, unlike your examples.

about two weeks ago
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Which Programming Language Pays the Best? Probably Python

narcc Re:Why program in Python (277 comments)

Within 2.x, you'll find many problems with backward compatibility. 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5 -- 2.6 got a lot of bad press, but it did break less stuff than the previous versions, so I'm excluding it for fairness.

I'm not sure what you're complaining about; no one is forcing you to upgrade versions if you don't want/need to, right?

How long will users be able to maintain an installation of, for example, 2.4 if their software depends on it? Will there even be anyone around who remembers that requirement in 5 or 10 years time? What about security issues? 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4 all have notable security issues.

Software should have a life-span longer than a midge-fly.

about two weeks ago
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Which Programming Language Pays the Best? Probably Python

narcc Re:Why program in Python (277 comments)

I'll use Python when it's stable. As it stands now, 'Python' isn't so much a language as it is a collection of similar, but incompatible, variations on a theme. If they're going to break it every other version, the least they could is fix some of the fundamental problems with the language.

about two weeks ago
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Google, National Parks Partner To Let Girls Program White House Xmas Tree Lights

narcc Re:Girls, girls, girls... (333 comments)

It's widely accepted that women are more comfortable learning and engaging in environments where they're not underrepresented. There are even some anecdotal examples of that in the comments here. By offering opportunities like this exclusively to women, you eliminate a lot of potential barriers that men, in general, don't face.

Your mistake is believing that if men and women are equal, then they face identical obstacles. That's, very obviously, not the case.

Consider for a moment how many programmers learn: They don't ask for permission, they don't apply for a government permit, many don't even take a class. They pick up a book or visit a website and start banging their heads against the wall. It's inherently egalitarian, and your standing in the community has every reason to be based on a meritocracy (you're just a series of characters, so nobody knows what you are unless you advertise)

A simple difference between your first and second statements: One is about individuals, the other is about individuals in groups. Programming is anything but egalitarian when you introduce social dynamics. Not everyone hides in their basement, you know. Sooner or later, you have to leave mom's cellar to attend work or school, or you may want to share what you're doing/learning with friends and family. Your belief that programming is "inherently" egalitarian depends on the ability for a woman to maintain anonymity. I don't really need to point out the absurdity of that!

Women shouldn't be forced to hide their gender to get equal treatment. In online communities, development communities in particular, the default assumption is that you're a man. Consequently, men don't need to "advertise" their gender nor make special efforts to conceal it (how could they?). In your pretend egalitarian world, you have women hiding behind a masculine or gender-neutral pseudonym and never engaging with anyone face-to-face!

See, you don't believe (or you don't believe that others believe) that women are just as capable as men. That's why you think they need to hide their gender -- that badge of inferiority -- from others. It's no wonder that you think programs like this are insulting to women; you think that it highlights a natural inferiority.

In short: Giving women special treatment like this helps ensure that women have equal opportunities. Women face different obstacles than men. If all programs like this were gender-neutral, they'd be (unintentionally) excluding women. It's not insulting, it's empowering.

about two weeks ago
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Google, National Parks Partner To Let Girls Program White House Xmas Tree Lights

narcc Re:Girls, girls, girls... (333 comments)

I am suspicious of someone that talks about considering and consuming information for thought that didn't consider personality types.

Meyers-Briggs, DISC, and similar Jungian personality assessments are bunk. That doesn't mean they can't be useful, but it does mean you can't rely on them for their intended purpose. I'm deeply suspicious myself of people who put stock in such things. Particularly Meyers-Briggs, as it's the most widely criticized, even if that's for no other reason than its popularity.

I am also suspicious of someone that talks about considering and consuming information for thought that managed to miss anticipating this reaction.

But it was anticipated! That's why I didn't engage more directly in the first place.

Considering this, it seemed like an opportunity to duck out of a discussion in an attempt to avoid any genuine discussion on the topic.

On that point, there's nothing to discuss. You'll note that I did offer him more specifics on his other points.

Additionally, your lack of substance in such discussions seems very practised.

Does it? I've found that people tend to "read in" to my posts more than what is actually there. I attributed this to the 'either-or' mentality you find here.

It is true, however, that I try to keep my personal views private as they're often irrelevant to the discussion. Unfortunately, most people here are more interested in someones personal beliefs than they are the content of their posts -- it makes it easier for them to dismiss what the other person has written. Rather than an "attempt to avoid any genuine discussion on the topic" as you suggest, it's one of the few ways to actually achieve it!

about two weeks ago
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Google, National Parks Partner To Let Girls Program White House Xmas Tree Lights

narcc Re:Girls, girls, girls... (333 comments)

If I offer anything, it will be rejected out-of-hand. If he comes to an answer on his own, through reading or reflection, he has no choice but to consider it.

You can't argue with ideologues on the internet. With luck, however, you can guide them.

about two weeks ago
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Google, National Parks Partner To Let Girls Program White House Xmas Tree Lights

narcc Re:Gender discrimination is cool now? (333 comments)

I felt calling him a douchebag was worthwhile because he was making one of those "I called your argument a fallacy therefor I win" internet debate styles that's just the worst, especially when they're wrong about it being a fallacy. I hate those guys, and feel no remorse about insulting them.

I couldn't agree more. I ran across this the other day, you may find it interesting as well.

Sorry to derail the discussion, I was just having a bit of fun.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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US Federal Agencies No Longer Allowed to Buy Apple Products

narcc narcc writes  |  more than 2 years ago

narcc (412956) writes "US federal government agencies are no longer able to purchase Apple products after the company withdrew from a mandatory certification scheme.

The Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certification is required under a law passed in 2009 if a federal government agency is to buy goods or services from a company. It ensures that the products meet minimum environmental protection standards.

It is not clear why Apple withdrew from the ratings service, especially as it cuts off sales to a fairly substantial customer — the US Government. One report by the iFixit blog suggested that the problem relates to the difficulty of repairing Apple products and stripping them down for recycling.

Apple has struggled with its eco-friendly credentials, with repeated reports from agencies such as Greenpeace criticizing the company, not just for what they know the company is doing, but also for their apparent secrecy about the environmental impact of their various manufacturing processes."

Link to Original Source
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Apple loses iPad trademark in China

narcc narcc writes  |  about 3 years ago

narcc (412956) writes "Apple and its Chinese resellers are facing legal action following a court ruling that found that Apple does not own the trademark to the iPad name in China. Proview International registered the IPAD trademark during an ill-fated attempt to break into the tablet market back in 2000.

In 2006, Proview Electronics (Taiwan) agreed to sell Apple the “global trademark” for the IPAD name for £35,000, according to Proview, but the two companies have subsequently disagreed about whether that deal included China. Proview has applied for an immediate halt to sales of the iPad by Apple resellers in the southern Chinese cities of Shenzhen and Huizhou, with the first hearings due in the next eight weeks."

Link to Original Source

Journals

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narcc narcc writes  |  more than 10 years ago

The other day (not too long ago) I got mod points for the first time. After they were gone, of course, I found several posts that were truely deserving of 'Insightful' and 'Interesting' -- I guess that goes to show you how careful you should be with the rare gift of mod points...

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