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The Students Who Feel They Have the Right To Cheat

neurovish Re:If everyone in government and industry cheats.. (438 comments)

Sigh. True that. We cheat about cheating by pretending we don't cheat.

No, we're just better at it. Reminds me of a course I had in school where about 80% of the grade was a single Java project where students worked in teams of 3 or 4. This project is always the same from one semester to the next. One of the projects from the previous year was floating around, and everybody had access to it. Out of a class of 50 or so students, I think 2 groups turned in what looked to be 100% original projects. The groups that re-used the old projects did so at varying levels...some of them completely changed the UI layout, some of them only changed the UI colors, and then you had the groups of the Asian students. They turned in the exact project from the previous semester only changing the names on it. There were 4 Asian groups, and they all had the exact same software...it was blatant. They also all received As on the project.

about two weeks ago
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The Students Who Feel They Have the Right To Cheat

neurovish Re:Worthless degrees (438 comments)

I'm surprised nobody has mentioned that if these students get a job where they are actually required to be able to do what they say they can, they'll get knocked on their ass real fast.

/quote>

That's when they become Oracle, Cisco, or Delloitte consultants and jump from one job to the next every 3 months.

about two weeks ago
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The Math Behind the Hipster Effect

neurovish Re:Great! More hipster hate. (176 comments)

I'm 41 with a gigantic oustache. I work in tech, live in San Francisco, like craft beer, and bike to work, all things associated with being a hipster (except my age). I don't define myself around my consumption habits; I just am. I like to bike. I like to drink craft beer. I like working in tech, and my facial hair rocks. It's the idiots out there like you who feel it's necessary to label folks different than themselves as " empty soulless yuppie shitheads." If you think that having a mustache or liking craft beer is what makes a person a shithead, then you are part of the problem.

Hmmm, you're pretty close. What size pants do you wear, and how often do you wear plaid?

about two weeks ago
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The Math Behind the Hipster Effect

neurovish Re:True anticonformancy (176 comments)

Showed up to a rave in a suit and tie once, got called out for "looking like everybody else" by a candy raver wearing a MLB knock off T. Laughed my ass off at her. Irony was not detected.

Good thing it wasn't a ska show, then she would've had a point.

about two weeks ago
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Pitivi Video Editor Surpasses 50% Crowdfunding Goal, Releases Version 0.94

neurovish Speaking of open source editing tools... (67 comments)

Is Cinelerra still around? Looks like there was an actual update back in September, which is the first movement I've seen on the project in about 5 years. I've never come across anybody else that uses it though.

about two weeks ago
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Undersized Grouper Case Lands In Supreme Court

neurovish Re:Overreach... (251 comments)

Everyone knows this is an overreach by the prosecutor and an abuse of the very intent of the law. All the Judges need to do is read up on the history of what lead to it's creation to understand that it was developed purely as a way to ensure that publicly traded corporations weren't reporting fictional financial statements. There is no way that this should have EVER reached the Supreme court, let alone this fisherman being convicted under this law. But, of course, we now have a legal system that prizes conviction over justice.

I also love the argument for why this conviction should be upheld. "The government replies that the "records only" argument would make it a crime for a murderer to destroy his victim's diary, but not the murder weapon." Um... The destruction of evidence to cover up a crime is already against the law (Tampering, Obstruction, etc.). Saying that the Sarbanes-Oxley law is needed for this is just plain silly..... I guess it's a good thing that I am not a Supreme court justice. If I were I would have laughed my head off at the pure stupidity...

FYI: I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV... The above are my personal opinions...

IMO, the guy got lucky. If he was in state waters, then that could have been his boat. 379.337(a):
(a)Property used in connection with a violation resulting in a conviction for the illegal taking, or attempted taking, sale, possession, or transportation of saltwater products is subject to seizure and forfeiture as part of the commission’s efforts to protect the state’s marine life. Saltwater products and seines, nets, boats, motors, other fishing devices or equipment, and vehicles or other means of transportation used or attempted to be used in connection with, as an instrumentality of, or in aiding and abetting such illegal taking or attempted taking are hereby declared to be nuisances.

I'm not sure how that statue would apply to federal waters or if he was caught after bringing the fish into state waters.

about three weeks ago
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The Great IT Hiring He-Said / She-Said

neurovish Re: What am I doing wrong? (574 comments)

Like a majority of the job postings we don't list the salary range. We only get to that part after the interview process which is why I know salary isn't the reason we are not receiving candidates. Our retention has also been very high so employees are satisfied with the overall benefits package. If we had candidates receive an offer and then refuse it, that would indicate a salary issue.

Personally, if a salary range is not posted, then I am probably not applying. It isn't trivial to apply for jobs these days. I would say that each job I apply for usually involves 2 - 4 hours of research. If I see a posting with no salary range, then I'm going to assume that company will low-ball me and is not worth my time. I will target one that lists a salary range that is reasonable. Post a realistic salary range where you would hire the right person on at any point along the range and not at the bottom. The good applicants will be shooting for the upper end. Mention the salary expectations up front and you'll save everybody time.

about three weeks ago
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The Great IT Hiring He-Said / She-Said

neurovish Re:What am I doing wrong? (574 comments)

I'm a "former" developer and current IT hiring manager. I am trying to fill a couple of developer positions. I worked with HR to craft the job description that best described the job opening... Without any crazy years of experience requirements. It is a senior level position though. At any rate, we have received only two qualified candidates in two months. And we have received only four or five resumes so it's not as if we have been weeding out a ton of candidates before interviewing them. One received a promotion from their current employer before we could bring them back for a second interview, the other was asking for almost double what we could have offered plus wanted to telecommute from out of state half the week. We just are not seeing candidates. Where do developers go when they are looking for jobs? Job boards are expensive and we can't afford to hit every one of them.

Indeed usually. Dice and Monster are virtually useless these days from a jobsearch perspective IMO. Also, people seem to get hired via offers that came through LinkedIn. Try looking through LinkedIn for candidates and shooting them an email? Where is the job location?

about three weeks ago
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The Great IT Hiring He-Said / She-Said

neurovish Re:There's a clue shortage (574 comments)

Move to a hypothetical rat hole, lets make up a name, say Gibraltar, and then reduce the salary to less than people usual make for the privilege of only having sun and beach around, and nothing else. Sure that it is far better than being in a city. Much better. I will relocate to there if then they pay me for a couple of years of therapy.

Gibralter is a rat hole? I'm going to cross that off my list of "weird places I could mve to".

about three weeks ago
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The Great IT Hiring He-Said / She-Said

neurovish Re:There's a clue shortage (574 comments)

I always wondered why tech offices were located in the centre of some crappy city or soulless business park (eg Winnersh in Reading, sigh).

If I had a big company to set up somewhere, it'd be in an area usually frequented by tourists - there are enough people wanting to move from their shitty rat race commute that they would want to relocate to a nice area. And you'd have the side benefit of having a trapped workforce who would never want to relocate back to their grimy city commute days.

So you want to setup shop in a "nice place to visit"?
Sure the Grand Canyon might be picturesque and all, and Las Vegas may be fun for a weekend, but no way in hell I want to live out there.

about three weeks ago
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Microsoft Enters the Wearables Market With 'Band'

neurovish Re:Dear Microsoft (135 comments)

Welcome to 2010. Good luck with that new operating system, people really seem to like their Windows XP. Too bad about Vista though.

I take this back...I see that you can talk into it. Now I eagerly await a self driving firebird so I can play out my knight rider fantasies.

about a month ago
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Microsoft Enters the Wearables Market With 'Band'

neurovish Dear Microsoft (135 comments)

Welcome to 2010. Good luck with that new operating system, people really seem to like their Windows XP. Too bad about Vista though.

about a month ago
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We Are All Confident Idiots

neurovish Re:Who? (306 comments)

You must not work in the corporate world. If you were not a confident idiot before joining, you will be after (or you'll be laid off). The guy who marches in the room with all the answers -> high value employee who knows his job and gets shit done. The guy who has more questions than answers? Incompetent idiot who ratholes meetings and deviates from the issue.

The irony is that usually the second guy is the more knowledgeable person, he knows enough to know he doesn't know shit. Unfortunately as in politics, the person with the snappy answer sets policy.

Hence why you need to be a lying sociopath to get ahead. You go into meetings with all of the confidence even though you know you are wrong or not entirely correct. Don't worry though, if anybody finds out, then you can always find a scapegoat.

about a month ago
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We Are All Confident Idiots

neurovish Re:I blame women (306 comments)

... I mean that Asian girls prefer men who lack self-confidence. Maybe because they're easier targets to walk all over?
this isn't scientific, so I'll stop here.

mmmm, with high heels too

about a month ago
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We Are All Confident Idiots

neurovish Re:I blame women (306 comments)

that sounds a bit confident. maybe it's too confident. maybe you are succumbing to Dunning-Kruger yourself!

I have found that if I sound confident, other people will listen and follow, regardless of whether I know what I am talking about. I have also found that women tend to be attracted to confident, self-assured men, and are less concerned about whether the guy is actually right or wrong. So, if my theory is correct, men should display more self-confidence. Maybe the author already considered gender differences, but I didn't RTFA, I am just assuming that I am right.

Taking what you say in a work context, I would agree. Whenever I go into a meeting, get asked a question, and respond with an accurate "it will most likely work", everybody freaks out and thinks I don't know what I'm doing. If I respond with "yeah, there's no way that can fail" while running through my head some edge cases that would cause it to fail, everybody leaves happy and congratulating themselves on a successful meeting. I eventually had it pointed out to me what I was doing, and now I see it clearly. For the most part, managers above mine have no clue what is going on, and only think it terms of "it will work" and "it won't work". They aren't going to go to the CIO and other senior directors and say "this is a good path, we are 92% certain it will work". In the end if I say it will work, and it really doesn't, then they have short memories anyways ... most of the time.

The most frustrating is when there's two options, one presented by somebody who has a history of not getting things right and generally doesn't know what he's doing, and one I present. The imbecile goes in with "this is the way to go, absolutely", and I go in with "this is the solution most likely to work. We'll know more after it runs for a few weeks and we have more history in this environment. They always go with the imbecile, and it always fails.

about a month ago
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Labor Department To Destroy H-1B Records

neurovish Re:Standard Document Retention Policy (190 comments)

The goal of an effective document retention policy is to identify documents that can be destroyed and destroy them as soon as it is permissible to do so. Old documents are a court case with a broad discovery order away from becoming a big cost. It's very cheap to say "the retention policy says these documents are only kept five years and we physically destroy them shortly after this date".

I know of a county government in New York that kept their backups tapes from their mail server as a method of retention. There was some political trouble with a mayor (who used the county's email system) and a contractor - suspicion of giving no-bid contracts or something like that. A request came to the county's doorstep for all of the email correspondence between the two for the four years the mayor was in office. The county had to buy a spare server and restore each monthly tape to it and manually pick out the email messages. It cost them $190,000. It would have been better for them to either have an effective archiving plan, or to have deleted them. Keeping stuff "just in case" is a horrible idea.

Of course, if these documents are being singled out for aggressive purging and other documents are not, then there may be some funny business going on.

This happens every. When I worked at a county, we kept a couple ancient Novell servers around so that we could rebuild edirectory and groupwise and pull email out of it. The first request took a member on my team a solid month working a few hours of overtime every day to fulfill (that's wehre the ancient servers came from to begin with). After that, the requests were quicker, but still occupied somebody for about a week.

about a month ago
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Labor Department To Destroy H-1B Records

neurovish Step up then... (190 comments)

presumably these are public records, because it's government and all. What's to stop anybody who is crying about "deletion of evidence" from submitting a FOIA request for all of the records that are set to be deleted, and then maintaining their own database?

about a month ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

neurovish Re:So Paul Venezia doesn't like systemd, we get it (863 comments)

Yet another clueless anti-systemd rant by Paul Venezia, yawn.

So now he goes on an ad hominen and labels systemd proponents as clueless noobs, while serious admins hate it. Right. I, for one, in one of my duties as a professional system admin manage hundreds of Linux machines, can't wait until we finally get rid of that SysV init crap in favor of systemd (I won't rehash all the advantages systemd brings here). Due to EL7 switching, we'll eventually get there, thanks Redhat!

I run hundreds of linux machines and have no issue with SysV. Go ahead and rehash. How does SysV cause you headaches? I don't doubt it solves problems for people that work in the same space that I do, but I really haven't seen any so far that made me think "wow, that is insufferable and needs to change".

about 1 month ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

neurovish Re:How about we hackers? (863 comments)

What are you talking about!?! my rc.httpd starts/stops apache, period... my rc.ntpd starts/stops ntpd, period... I could go on.

You are kidding right? The /etc/init.d/apache2 have 282 lines, which such nice loops like "# wait until really stopped if [ -n "${PID:-}" ]; then i=0 while kill -0 ${PID:-}" 2> /dev/null; do ..." that are obsolete in systemd, and hackery like "if $APACHE2CTL configtest > /dev/null 2> then # if the config is ok than we just stop normaly $APACHE2CTL stop 2>&1 | grep -v 'not running' >&2 || true else ..."

So, what does systemd look like instead to make sure you aren't trying to stop/restart apache with a bad config? ...and that "wait until apache is really stopped" loop is basically cosmetic so you can get a nice little "apache is stopped" message, so you're more than welcome to not put that in your init script.

about 1 month ago

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