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Most Doctors Don't Think Patients Need Full Access To Med Records

notaspy Arrogance (659 comments)

I'm an attorney, so I know a little bit about arrogance, but we're patzers compared with doctors. Many truly have, if not God, then Emperor complexes, with their wisdom received without question by their subjects.

But that's probably not the real reason they don't want patients to have access to their complete medical records. It's all about avoiding medical malpractice claims (and annoying phone calls from patients asking questions).

So blame the lawyers.

about 2 years ago
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The Patents That Threaten 3-D Printing

notaspy Re:Let's not confuse patent applications with pate (134 comments)

Excellent point. The "ridiculously broad patent" referred to in the summary is not a patent at all, but is the '521 application you describe.

A patent application is not a patent, even though it hopes to be some day.

about 2 years ago
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Hurricane Sandy Nears East Coast

notaspy The Beginning of the End (281 comments)

Wednesday, October 31, 2012. RIP USA. In hindsight, it all should have been obvious three days earlier. That would have been early enough to have prevented it - the shockingly abrupt and utter destruction of the Unites States of America.

On Sunday (that innocent Sunday just before the end of our world), the events on opposite sides of the country seemed natural, coincidental. The Frankenstorm that Sandy was about to become was just another prediction made by a bunch of self-anointed experts. No biggie, New Jersey could use a good scrubbing. A couple. And the earthquake off Alaska was only about as big as the one we had here in New England last week. Meh. The tsunami that hit Hawaii was measured at nearly half an inch. Not even worth a âoemeh.â

Most people watching the northeast were anticipating a couple days of storm, a week of cleanup, a bunch of bitching about damage, but employment would have went up in a hurry with all the rebuilding and repairs. One of the Presidential canditates would have made it a central theme of his last campaign week â" The Reconstruction of America. The country would come together, mostly, in a national unity of rebuilding. Spirits and the economy would have soared, the elections turning into a catastrophe for one of the major political parties. But none of that happened, it's just the ravings of a lunatic refugee. A refugee with a goatee. Ha-Ha-Ha-Ha-Ha!!!!! Sorry, I've had a rough three days.

The Chinese have been doing large-scale meteorological experiments for many years. They were open about their efforts to control the weather for the 2012 Olympics in the Beijing area. There have been articles published in legal and even mass-market periodicals about the scientific, legal and ethical implications of such research have been debated. It wasn't something unknown to the general public. On the other hand, nobody except a few graduate professors and pharmaceutical chemists noticed the paper in the April issue of Chem. Phys. Acta. entitled âoeRacemization of Novel Isotopes of Mercaptothionitrite.â

The Alaska earthquake (5.5 Richters) on Sunday caused a mass evacuation of Waikiki and other populated regions of the islands. An overabundance of caution maybe, or maybe a proper abundance of caution. Who knows? It's a statistical thing, so I'll get back to you every Sigma, just like with bosons. How many you want? Three? Four? Five? How much time you got? I got lotsa Sigmas.

The Vancouver quake on Monday, however, took people by surprise. It was huge, over 9 R, one of the largest quakes ever recorded. Plus, it was a diagonal slip-shear transfer fault. Fortunately, these are extremely rare, and nearly always found in the deep ocean. A series of tsunamis emanating from the quake bounced around the Puget Sound, creating dozens of transitory superharmonic tsunamis over 100 feet high that pretty much created a brand new coastline, mostly devoid of structure or vegetation underneath all the wreckage. But that's getting ahead.

Nobody paid much attention either to a page 6 story from a supermarket tabloid about a school in India that mysteriously disappeared. The magazine had actually come out in June and was really only a paragraph without many details beyond name of the local region. But somebody did pay attention, and using Google Maps found that in every recent satellite photo of the named region, there was a nearly circular region that was blurred out. In archived photos, however, there was a small town (~75,000 folks) at the location. Somebody pointed this out on Slashdot, and several experts quickly came on to say that they didn't think the photos had been edited. The pictures showed what was actually there. Well, that did it, suddenly a thousand geeks, shut-ins, hackers and conspiracy theorists had a race/joint project/contest, and the story was quickly put together.

A former pharmaceutical chemist from Bangalore had retired inland, and was running an informal school for recent college graduates to obtain practical commercial laboratory experience. One of his standard student projects was to reproduce a novel chemical synthesis from a recent journal article. One of the students, apparently taken by the phrase âoethermal nitrate,â chose the above-referenced Mercaptothionitrite article. Maybe I should just call it the Racemization article. You know, I think I'll go with âoeThermal Nitrateâ also. Anyway, the actual synthesis seemed fairly basic. A lot of steps, some tedious and time-consuming, but that's one of the goals of chemistry, to fine tune the efficiency of each individual step. Especially if the process has 23 steps. The journal article described the reaction in fairly standard small scale research quantities. Reagents generally measured in single digits of grams, or less, with a final yield, hopefully, of a gram or so. The student was thinking large scale, factory level production. He couldn't do anything truly industrial, but he could scale up by a factor of 10, certainly, maybe 100. That's what we know from his digital notes. Nobody knows how much he ultimately scaled it up by, though, except that it was enough to reduce to rubble an oval area about 10 miles wide by 12 miles long. Later, more meticulous and cautious chemists were successful with the synthesis. The name thermal nitrite is apt. Contact with small quantities of water releases enormous amounts of amorphous energy. A large quantity of water releases proportionally more energy, up to a calculated maximum. I can get you the numbers, if you want. The unfortunate student probably produced between 5 and 50 grams of thermal nitrite. Some are now calling for it to be nicknamed "blue matter," but I think that would be a cheap shot.

We don't know how they did it, but the enemy who shall remain nameless filled hundreds of dropsondes with blue nitrate. As Hurricane Sandy approached the east coast as a Category 1 storm, more and more dropsondes were dropped in to monitor the cyclone's development. Hundreds of dropsondes, as it turns out. Enough blue matter to catalyze the storm's explosion, from Sunday night to Monday afternoon, into a 1200 mile wide Category 5+ Godzilla. Just in time to slam into Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut with a 25 foot storm surge accompanied by 140 mph winds. More than half of Long Island was completely inundated. Nobody had power. Every road was closed. 19 of every 20 rescue/repair vehicles were out of commission. Millions dead. Tens of millions missing. The country watched in stunned horror, while rescue and assistance forces across the country mobilized to aid rescues and repairs. The media rented, bought and stole every helicopter within 5000 miles and descended like seagulls, but with less comic value. Too quickly for everyone, as it turns out. The Mercaptothionitrite releases a particularly toxic and persistent cyanate, in a naturally weaponized molecular form. Highly dispersive and capable of transdermal absorption. By Tuesday night, over 99% of the population in the storm area was dead. Anyone making contact with water from the storm was done for. I was in the 1%, deep in the mountains, and have been on the run ever since.

Turns out the Alaska quake wasn't a natural quake. The Russian deep water submersible Khruschev was in the area just prior to the quake, tasked for seismic research. Evidently they found what they were looking for, for they dropped in a few old nukes that were just taking up space in the garage anyway. Who would've guessed Russians would be so good at seismology? The chain reaction proceeded in 4 steps from Vancouver to San Diego, pretty much tearing up the entire coast. What few rescue teams remained were rendered irrelevant when the tectonic upheaval unleashed the Yellowstone supervolcano. Good-bye mountain region and plains up to including all (thank the creator) of Missouri.

Suddenly the Western half of the country was overrun. Chinese from San Diego to Oregon, Russians from Alaska to Washington. The Canadians were allowed to keep much of their land, but were required to pay substantial reparations to both Russia and China, said reparations to be paid in oil, natural gas and salmon. Canada also had to be China's bitch, with Russia having conjugal rights once a month. Nobody bothered Mexico, which grabbed Texas while nobody was watching. Texas reluctantly acceded to the Senorita's advances, but swore in its bitter heart to someday take over and destroy from within the country to which it now belonged. Some older Texans felt a subtle twinge of deja vu, but it passed quickly.

Meanwhile, the northeast of the former United States was beginning the process of transforming into a million square miles of pure death. Every plant, insect, bird and animal died. The virulent cyanate would only become inactive within about 48 hours after complete drying (or by being exposed to direct sunlight for 6 hours). With Washington D.C. in ashes (wait 'til you hear what happened there â" it strains credulity), the U.N. Security Council replaces the U.S. with India, then proceeds to declare a Palestinian homeland in the area destroyed by the poisonous hurricane. Really, India? We thought you were cool! New Palestine is rapidly turning into a toxic, rubble-strewn desert surrounded by hostile neighbors, but hey, it's still a big trade-up.

And Florida? Well, suffice it to say that it's now a whole lot easier to get a great Cuban cigar. It's amazing how much can happen in three days. As I've said, it should have all been obvious the moment that stupid Alaskan earthquake went off.

more than 2 years ago
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NASA Announces Discovery of 30-Year-Old Black Hole

notaspy Re:Relativity of Simultaneity (195 comments)

"there is no frame of reference in which B preceded A, or in which A and B are simultaneous."

From the photon's point of view they are simultaneous.

more than 4 years ago
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Stuxnet Was Designed To Subtly Interfere With Uranium Enrichment

notaspy Re:Resources, will, and motive (334 comments)

You're going to love the Belgium theory.

more than 4 years ago
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NASA Reveals Hundred Year Starship Program

notaspy Re:nothing on starships (351 comments)

And how are we going to make these incredible advances in space travel without experimenting with space travel?

more than 4 years ago
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Mystery of the Dying Bees Solved

notaspy Re:Too bad, do we help them...? (347 comments)

"We do not have the man power to pollinate our crops by hand, without bees no fruit."

We can solve two problems with a single stroke. With 20 million Americans out of work, let's get them out in the fields, woods, orchards and gardens with little paintbrushes, pollinating like crazy.

more than 4 years ago
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Tapping Solar Wind's Renewable Energy

notaspy Eric Bland off his meds? (277 comments)

TFA reads like it was written by a crackhead in need of a fix.

1) Only one dimension is given for the sail, its "width." Should we assume it has a square profile, or is its length greater/less than the width, or is it even rectangular? Who the hell knows.

2) No direct mention is made regarding where this "satellite" is located. The cryptic comment "over the millions of miles between the satellite and Earth" doesn't help much. Certainly too far to be geosynchronous. Perhaps a heliosynchronous orbit? Who knows.

I picked a bad day to let my subscription to the International Journal of Astrobiology lapse.

more than 4 years ago
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Google Patent Proposes $2 Fee To Skip Commercials

notaspy How 'bout a nice Mokie-Coke? (434 comments)

I could sure go for a Mokie-Coke right now. Wouldn't you like one too?

more than 4 years ago
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100/1 Odds On 'First Contact' Within a Year

notaspy Re:Let me be the first to say... (309 comments)

Planck odds

"It has nothing to do with the real probabilities, which are as close to zero as you can get."

more than 4 years ago
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DDoS From 4chan Hits MPAA and Anti-Piracy Website

notaspy Re:counterproductive (318 comments)

links anyone?

"If anonymous members can't target more essential parts of their business with their attacks, they shouldn't bother."

more than 4 years ago
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Dept. of Homeland Security To Test Iris Scanners

notaspy Sounds great, (221 comments)

but the TSA will be administering them rectally.

more than 4 years ago
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USPTO Lets Amazon Patent the "Social Networking System"

notaspy Main Claims in the Patent (265 comments)

1. A computer-implemented method, comprising: receiving and storing personal data of a first user of a computer-based service, said computer-based service accessible to users over a network, said personal data specified by the first user; providing a user interface for users to establish contact relationships with other users of the service such that each user can have one or more contacts, said user interface enabling a user to identify other users of the service, and to selectively initiate the generation of requests to establish contact relationships with the identified users; receiving a request from a second user of the service to establish a contact relationship with the first user, said request submitted to the service over a network via said user interface; sending a notification of the request to the first user over a network; providing an option, in connection with said request, for the first user to grant permission for the second user to view at least some of the personal data of the first user; and in response to the first user granting said permission, providing the second user access to at least some of the personal data of the first user via a contact information user interface of the service, such that the second user is provided access to data that would not otherwise be accessible to the second user via the service; wherein the method, including receiving and storing the personal data, providing the user interface, receiving the request, sending the notification, providing said option, and providing the second user access, is performed by a server computer system.

13. A computer system that provides a service to users over a network, said computer system comprising a processor and a memory, an being programmed, via executable program instructions, to perform a method that comprises: receiving and storing personal data of a first user of the service, said personal data specified by the first user; providing a user interface for users to establish contact relationships with other users of the service such that each user can have one or more contacts, said user interface enabling a user to identify other users of the service, and to selectively initiate generation of requests to establish contact relationships with the identified users; receiving a request from a second user of the service to establish a contact relationship with the first user, said request submitted to the service over a network via said user interface; sending a notification of the request to the first user over a network; providing an option, in connection with said contact relationship, for the first user to grant permission for the second user to view at least some of the personal data of the first user; and in response to the first user granting said permission, providing the second user access to at least some of the personal data of the first user via a contact information user interface of the service, such that the second user is provided access to data that would not otherwise be accessible to the second user via the service.

more than 4 years ago
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USPTO Lets Amazon Patent the "Social Networking System"

notaspy Prior Art Cited in the Patent (265 comments)

Wellman (For A Social Network Analysis of Computer Networks), Jan. 1996, ACM, pp. 1-11. cited by examiner .
Kautz et al (ReferralWeb: Combining Social Networks and Collaborating Filtering), Mar. 1997, Communication of the ACM, vol. 40 No. 3, pp. 1-4. cited by examiner .
"1997 Edition GS Lotus Organizer/Exploring Organizer/Windows 95 edition," pp. iii-vii and 8-1-8-6. cited by other .
"Applications Handbook For the Palm III .TM.Organizer," 3Com, pp. iii-v, and 1-12 (Apr. 1998). cited by other .
"Symantec ACT! User's Guide and Reference, Version 2.0 For Windows," pp. ix-xvi and 3-11-3-26. cited by other .
"Information about Lotus Notes from the Lotus Web Site (www.Lotus.com), " pp. 1-13 (Apr. 1998). cited by other .
"Domino 4.6 Features Overview," Jul. 1997, 2 pages, www.lotus.com/domino. cited by other .
"Yahoo! White Pages," Copyright 1994-1998, Yahoo!, http://www.yahoo.com/. cited by other .
"WhoWhere?," Copyright 1995-1998, Who/Where? Inc., http://www.whowhere.com/. cited by other .
R. Tamura, et al., "Lotus Notes 4," pp. 39, 64-65, and 176 (1996). cited by other .
Cardwell, "Cyberscene Planet Keeps You in Touch," Dec. 1996, Boston Herald Boston. cited by other .
Day, "New Software Tracks Corporate Travel Plans," Jan. 1991, Denver Post (Denver, CO,US), V99 N153 sC p2, Dialog File 63 Accession No. 0187621. cited by other .
Wetzel, "Municipally-owned venues feel brunt of city budget cuts," Aug. 1991, Amusement Business, v103, n31, p3(3), Dialog File 148, Accession No. 05427255. cited by other .
"Should manufacturers try to establish rapport with their agents' other principals," Mar. 1995, Agency Sales Magazine v25n3, pp. 13-15, Dialog File 15, Accession No. 00988855. cited by other .
Smith, "Companies Meet Each Other at the Airport," Jul. 1995, The Los Angeles Times, ISSN: 04583035. cited by other .
Gerety, "Whose Job Is It Anyway?; Meetings As a Subset of Travel: Yes or No?," Apr. 1992, Business Travel News, ISSN: 8750-3670. cited by other .
Brisson, et al., "Lifeco Puts Pre-Trip Control in Travel Managers' Hands," Mar. 1991, Business Travel News, ISSN: 8750-3670. cited by other .
"PlanetAll plans to Make a World of Difference in Busy Lives," Nov. 1996, PR Newswire, pp. 1113NEW025. cited by other .
"Fall Internet World '96 Exhibitor Previews," Dec. 3, 1996, Business Wire, p. 12030220, Dialog File 16, Accession No. 04716024. cited by other .
Answer and Second Amended Counterclaims of Defendant Amazon.com, Inc. in Cordance Corporation v. Amazon.com, Inc. (C.A. No. 06-491-MPT). cited by other.

more than 4 years ago
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US Rejects Demands For ACTA Transparency

notaspy Re:Then fuck it. (351 comments)

"can any of the americans explain this to us here ?"

I didn't do it. I don't approve of it. I don't know where it came from, and maybe not even what the hell it is.
Yet somehow I feel responsible.
We suck.

more than 4 years ago
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UMG To Price New CDs Under $10

notaspy Re:I love the juxaposition (362 comments)

"I swear, Thick as a Brick should be a Jethro Tull song, not a description of record company executives...."

An album which makes the case for the superiority of vinyl (packaging).

more than 4 years ago
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"Patent Markings" Lawsuits Could Run Into the Trillions

notaspy SOLO wins on Summary Judgment (193 comments)

In more recent developments, Solo is granted summary judgment. BNet's cited blog post must have missed it.

http://www.williamsmullen.com/rocketdocketiplit/blog.aspx?topic=63&All=null&IsListParentTopic=true
"Last week, in a case it described as one of "practically first impression," the Eastern District of Virginia granted summary judgment in favor of Solo Cup Co. that it was not liable for improper patent marking under 35 U.S.C. 292(a). Pequignot v. Solo Cup Co., No 1:07cv897-LMB/TCB (E.D. Va. July 2, 2009). The Court agreed with Solo that the advice of counsel it received to replace patent-marking molds with non-marking molds in a gradual fashion was reasonable. Solo's overall conduct was held to evidence a lack of intent to deceive the public. The Court also held that an "offense" under the statute is the overall decision to mark improperly, thereby rejecting Pequignot's argument that Solo should be penalized for each and every lid it marked."

"Solo also prevailed on summary judgment with respect to its fallback position, namely, that even if there were intent to deceive the public, the offenses punishable under the statute are the decisions to mark improperly, not each and every marking of a product. Thus, in an alternative holding, the Court decided that the maximum amount of damages for which Solo could be liable is $1500."

And in a recent article by Law Professor Thomas Field, http://www.ipfrontline.com/printtemplate.asp?id=24082
"The opinion in Pequignot v. Solo Cup Co., 646 F.Supp.2d 790 (E.D. Va. 2009) (Pequignot III), a case resolved last August, and now on appeal, signals a very different, perhaps more typical view of those who seek to recover under section 292(b). There, the court grants summary judgment for Solo because it was unable to find deceptive intent."

more than 4 years ago

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