Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Enraged Verizon FiOS Customer Seemingly Demonstrates Netflix Throttling

oobayly Re:Alternative explanation (393 comments)

Surely what you'd do is traceroute to the VPN server, which will show you where the packets leave the ISP network (as long as the VPN is outside of it), and then traceroute to Netflix via the VPN. The compare it do the route taken directly to Netflix.

3 days ago
top

Enraged Verizon FiOS Customer Seemingly Demonstrates Netflix Throttling

oobayly Re: Alternative explanation (393 comments)

Have they started naming and shaming the ISPs who refuse to host a Netflix Open Connect box in their data centres?

3 days ago
top

Soccer Superstar Plays With Very Low Brain Activity

oobayly Re:So (156 comments)

Or even a comparison with his brain activity when inactive.

3 days ago
top

Cable Companies: We're Afraid Netflix Will Demand Payment From ISPs

oobayly Re:Millionare panhandlers (199 comments)

As a teenager in Dublin, I once needed change for a bus, so went into a shop and bought a sandwich. After walking past a beggar with a sign saying "need money for food", I thought "I don't really want this sandwich", so I gave it to him. That was one withering look he gave me.

3 days ago
top

"Magic Helmet" For F-35 Ready For Delivery

oobayly Re:Cost (184 comments)

Don't worry, it'll come down in price:

The helmet runs for about $600,000, ... But Lockheed Martin hopes the cost will drop as production ramps up.

Yup, I can see production really ramping up for the F-35. Like most things in life, it's possibly to build something to do everything, just don't be upset when it does everything badly.

4 days ago
top

The Psychology of Phishing

oobayly Re:well (128 comments)

They register domains similar enough to the company and often related (support-raytheon for example) so that even people that look for questionable URLs can be fooled.

This is also made harder with the use of CDNs nowadays. A while ago our office started receiving large numbers of "InterFax" notification with a download link. I don't know what a proper InterFax notification looks like, but as you said, they did look professional, and in some cases the URL didn't look too dissimilar to some CDN URLs we've used.

I tend to visit web pages used in phishing attacks for a couple of reasons. First, I like to input useless data. Second, I like to rate what sort of job the scammers did in cloning he web site - I always feel a little let down when I see dead links, as they didn't make the effort to duplicate all the pages linked to by the cloned login page. Seriously guys, put some effort into your scams - the work ethic of the criminal world is really dropping.

5 days ago
top

Firefox 33 Integrates Cisco's OpenH264

oobayly Re: Trusting a binary from Cisco (194 comments)

They're probably the same people who signed off the switches I bought. The same switches that conveniently changed into a hub* after a couple of months. Maybe they expected them to be rebooted constantly.

* Entries weren't being added to the ARP table, probably because of a timestamp overflow.

5 days ago
top

China Plans Particle Colliders That Would Dwarf CERN's LHC

oobayly Re:How many broken parts trying to spin up? (218 comments)

Why wouldn't they:

... the second has been defined as the duration of 9192631770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom

It's clearly the obvious way to define time.

about a week ago
top

UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

oobayly Re:Sensible response by an ISP (115 comments)

I'm a little disappointed that they even ask about filtering - obviously it's something they've been forced to do, which is shit because having to have the ability to filter connections adds to their costs.

I might log onto IRC and ask if they can provide what percentage of customers actually ask for a filtered connection.

about a week ago
top

UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

oobayly Re:More inconvienient than the average filter. (115 comments)

I suggest blocking religious websites by default

Well, the stories the tell are loaded with sex and violence, and sometimes they even mix the two together - somebody should tell the Tories & Daily Mail readers, I bet they'd be furious.

about a week ago
top

UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

oobayly Re:More inconvienient than the average filter. (115 comments)

You can do it online, but it's much more satisfying calling them up and asking them to turn on porn on your mobile phone contract. Added points if you put on a creepy voice when doing so.

Same with a colleague - BMW run a premium rate line to check the specification and service history - and he uses his mobile to do so - it's a business expense. He received a call from Vodafone asking if he knew he was calling a lot of premium rate numbers. His answer? "Oh yes, I like calling those numbers". He's also brilliant when answering cold callers:
* Hello, I'm calling from [company] are you a homeowner?
* Are you calling me a homo - how dare you...

about a week ago
top

UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

oobayly Re:Question: (115 comments)

Just use a decent ISP - at the risk of sounding like a shill/employee/investor - Andrews & Arnold are pretty good, plus they provide native IPv6.

about a week ago
top

UK Users Overwhelmingly Spurn Broadband Filters

oobayly Re:Question: (115 comments)

Thanks for that - found it and added it to my favourites.

about a week ago
top

Why Are the World's Scientists Continuing To Take Chances With Smallpox?

oobayly Re:The problem is... (190 comments)

They don't know everything - they just know whether you prefer Burger King or McDonalds, and that you lied to your friends about how pretty your girlfriend is.

about a week ago
top

Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

oobayly Re:It was Putin's missle? (667 comments)

I don't often bump a comment, in fact I never have - please tell me why I shouldn't "place too much faith in FlightRadar24"? Explain what to look out for so that I can use an educated opinion as to whether the data is valid or not.

Not educating me just means that I will continue to use the data as given as you've not supported your opinion.

about a week ago
top

Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

oobayly Re:It was Putin's missle? (667 comments)

How so? Are the points often grossly inaccurate (out by 10s of km), are the timestamps invalid, do they simply make up data? If you can tell me why the data shouldn't be relied upon (or at least believed), I'm willing to listen.

The reason I'm pushing FlightRadar24 is because the data is there. I also am "trusting" that their data is real because they show gaps in the data as opposed to filling estimated positions in the track between known points. This means that people are less likely to jump to conclusions because they don't realise they're looking at an estimated great circle track.

I've seen no kinks in the tracks to imply that the data is jumping around, or that the points are collected out of order. What I've read about ADS-B gives me no reason to think that the positions and data shouldn't be accurate - otherwise Australia, the US and EU wouldn't be requiring it for some aircraft.

So we're left with the receiving stations - is it possible that amateur receivers are pushing corrupt data to the website, though from what I've read:

ADS-B messages (transmitted every sec without interrogation, with (plane symbol) or without (ball symbol) position, Mode-S downlink format=17) are encoded together with an unambigious 24-bit CRC checksum and would be discarded by a proper decoder if that checksum is false

so receivers shouldn't be doing that.

So, as far as I can tell, we're left with purposely corrupted data, which I'd like to think wouldn't happen, or if it did would be picked up by users.

about a week ago
top

Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

oobayly Re:Protip: (667 comments)

Bit late, but to put in my 2p worth:

It's the scene of an "accident", not a crime.

They're not mutually exclusive - if I run somebody over while drink driving, it was an accident - I didn't mean to do it - but it was still a crime.

Would the US or Britain permit an external power (e.g. Ukraine) to investigate any of their territories?

The Korean Aviation and Railway Accident Investigation Board (ARAIB) helped take part in the Asiana 214 investigation

350 Palestinians deliberately killed in the past 4 days

While distressing, it's [to be blunt] irrelevant. Just because other terrible things are going on in the world, doesn't mean that we can't discuss the handling of this accident.

The United States and England lost all credibility the second they (predictably) mounted their co-ordinated propaganda campaigns.

Actually, I kind of agree with this - the speed at which Ukraine, the US and the western media jumped at blaming Russia may have been a mistake - it could have been better to keep calm until the facts were in. It's quite possible that the Pro-Russian rebels would have provided better access. However It's also quite possible that - with no criticism - that the rebels would have been even less willing to provide access to the site. Blocking access to investigators was an appalling act.

about a week ago
top

Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

oobayly Re:Do you have any hands-on experience ? (667 comments)

The other question I have of the theory that an SU-25 shot MH17 down with a R-60 missile is this - it's a IR guided missile with a 3kg warhead. This means that it will home in on the engines before detonating - meaning that the engine should take the brunt of the explosion. Reading the wikipedia entry, it cites a BAe-125 being hit by one and causing the engine to fall off. The twin engined (not any more it wasn't) business jet managed to make a successful emergency landing. I don't know what altitude this happened, so the pressure difference may not have been too great, but keep in mind that the BAe-125 has a service ceiling of 41,000ft

Compare this to KAL 007 which was shot down by a radar guided K-8 missile which has a 40kg warhead - that's over 13 times the mass of an R-60 warhead. The 747 continued to fly for 12 minutes.

In my mind, a radar guided missile show target the fuselage (the largest radar return), which is what happened with KAL 007 - The co-pilot reported to Captain Chun twice during the flight after the missile's detonation, "Engines normal, sir.", which is more likely cause explosive decompression (MH17 and KAL007 were at similar altitudes).

We are being expected to believe that a IR guided warhead less than 1/10 of that which allowed KAL007 to continue flying downed MH17. It seems far more likely that a BUK radar guided SAM (with a 70kg warhead) was the cause.

Finally, the competing theories are:
1. Accidentally shot down with a BUK missile (either Ukraine or Pro-Russian)
2. Purposefully shot down with a Ukraine R-60 launched from a ground attack aircraft.

I struggle to understand the logic required to even consider #2, regardless of who one believes was responsible.

about a week ago
top

Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

oobayly Re:It was Putin's missle? (667 comments)

Fair point - they do have that timestamps, etc - however they don't use their hi-res data when rendering the track - they also insist on draw points that are unknown - hence the utter confusion being caused (especially with those with an axe to grind*).

* I've been called a shill, but nowhere have I made an assumption over who was responsible - MH17 appears to have been shot down (there's evidence of shrapnel in multiple photos). Whether it was a SAM or AAM, I don't know. I do however get pissed of when people don't think about the information they're looking at, and post it without considering how valid it may be.

Also, you'll notice from the 16th July data pretty much the whole flight from the Poland-Ukraine border to India is estimated (great circle between two known ASD-B points). The FlightRadar24 data has ADS-B data all the way from Amsterdam to Turkmenistan - then they have a gap in their data (which they don't draw, as drawing points you don't know is bad practice) until Pakistan. From what I can tell, FlightRadar24's coverage is far better.

I've also watched [on Russia Today's youtube channel] the Kremlin's presentation on how MH17 was diverted. That diversion wasn't reflected the ADS-B data (although Russian military's should be more accurate**) - it'll be interesting to see what the FDR comes back with.

** What I'm struggling with is the orientation of the chart shown - if it's North-Up, then they're saying MH17 was flying due west when it was directed out of the corridor, where as the ADS-B data show it flying a "fairly" consistent 118 deg.

about a week ago

Submissions

top

Some company in Belize tried to trademark "MH17" and "MH370"

oobayly oobayly writes  |  about a week ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "The Guardian reports that a company in Belize has filed to trademark MH17 and MH370 — full article on Coconuts Kuala Lumpur. The application MH17 was filed on 17th July 2014 — the same day as the disaster occurred, whereas the application for MH370 was filed on 2nd May 2014 — almost two months after the flight disappeared.

The application for "MH17" was filed on the European Trade Mark and Design Network website, while details for the "MH370" application was found on the Justia Trademarks site.

The scope of the application is also wide ranging:

From conferences, exhibitions and competitions; to education and instruction, and entertainment services (namely, the provision of continuing programmes, segments, movies, and shows delivered by television, radio, satellite and the Internet).

Clearly, this is cynical way of attempting to collect (I hesitate to use the word "earn") money from the reporting of Malaysian Airlines two disasters, however, does this actually have any merit? Seeing as the MH17 trademark application has been filed in Europe — the region from where most of the victims came from, it seems highly unlikely, but past experience tells us that we can't make any assumptions."

top

Bruce Willis 'considering iTunes legal action' against Apple

oobayly oobayly writes  |  about 2 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "It appears that Bruce "Die Hard" Willis isn't too impressed that he can't include his iTunes collection in his estate when he dies.

Bruce Willis, the Hollywood actor, is said to be considering legal action against Apple so he can leave his iTunes music collection to his three daughters.

Such a high profile individual complaining about the ability to own your digital music can only be a good thing, right? I suggest that also assaulting Cupertino in a dirty white vest would do the job."
Link to Original Source

top

Arizona drivers say no to Gatso cameras

oobayly oobayly writes  |  more than 4 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "The Daily Telegraph reports that Arizona drivers are ignoring tickets being issued by UK style fixed speeding cameras. It appears that as the fines are not being delivered in person it's possible for them to be ignored as there's no proof of receipt. Judges appear to be agreeing with this (in the US anyway).
Why can't we use the same excuse here in the UK?"

Link to Original Source
top

Estate of Philip K. Dick to sue Google.

oobayly oobayly writes  |  more than 4 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "The Daily Telegraph reports that the estate of science fiction author Philip K. Dick is sueing Google for copying the name Nexus Six for their new Android phone. There's no evidence that the estate has trademarked Nexus Six in regards to mobile phones, so what case could they have and what solicitor would take up this case?
As an owner of Philip K. Dick books & an Android developer I never saw the connection (sad but true), and even though Google say it's nothing to do with Do androids dream of electric sheep I see it as a geeky nod to the authors work, essentially memorialising him."

Link to Original Source
top

The legality of publishing email addresses.

oobayly oobayly writes  |  more than 4 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "Like most people I receive a fair amount of chain emails, some humourous, most downright idiotic. No matter how I try educating colleagues, family & friends, I still receive them and am now resigned to the fact that you just can't help some people.
One of my explanations of why forwarding these emails is a bad idea was that they are a perfect harvesting ground for spammers: a very high percentage of the addresses will be live. This, it turned out fell upon deaf ears. If you're stupid enough to believe that Dell will give you a free laptop then you're probably the type of person that believes that a Nigerian general wants to give you $150,000,000 (ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY MILLION DOLLARS!!!!).

As a bit of an experiment, I used a few tools (grep, awk, etc) to parse my Maildir for any emails that appeared to have been forwarded and extracted anything that looked like an email address. As one would imagine there were a good few (thousand) email addresses. Most of these email addresses belong to innocent by-standers. The real culprits are the people who forward them, and it takes only a little more effort to extract only those.

Part of me has decided these people who waste bandwidth, time and have caused me to lose my hair deserve to pay. What better way to do it than to publish their email addresses for spammers to harvest?

Of course, this is unethical, but is it actually illegal? By sending an email urging others to forward the content, are they not actively pushing their details into the public domain?

Answers on postcards please."

Journals

oobayly has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...