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BT Blocking Private Torrent Sites?

oobayly Re:BT? Sky? (70 comments)

To add further to the description of BT - a company split into three parts - BT Retail (the phone provider / ISP), BT Wholesale (who run the infrastructure and exchanges), and BT Openreach (who run the last mile infrastructure). It's supposed to mean they can't abuse their monopoly. As far as the customer is concerned, it means that reporting a fault might have to go through 3 companies and most of the time spent is the 3 companies passing the buck. They also like to charge each other and pass the cost on to the customer.

Phone lines cut out randomly

I was present as he reported the findings to his Boss and I heard his Boss say "Can you make it look like their fault so we can still bill them?" He replied "No cos he is stood here listening and watched me fix it". This was followed up with an extremely apologetic conversation between me and his Boss where he claimed he was just Kidding!!! Yeah right...That sums BT up exactly

BT Retail is basically staffed by a bunch of MBAs, salemen and shit tech support (although their BTnet tech support is actually pretty good). BT Local business are a bunch of complete wankers and will [literally] cancel your ISDN30 and recreate it so they get more commission - this resulted in 36 hours of downtime.

BT Openreach - you're not allowed to speak to - but when an engineer does come out, they are generally professional and knowledgable. However, in the above case, they will fulfill BT Retails requests to cover their arses. In the above ISDN30 case, they pretended that the failure was due to a faulty NTE-2D (Fibre termination equipment) even though we had it confirmed that our contract had been "cancelled" the day before.

We have a 100Mb/s leased line with BT, which I have to admit has been pretty bulletproof - we've had about 30s of downtime in 4 years (but is also insanely expensive). Anyhow, when we renewed out contract I told them we wanted an IPv6 subnet, this was subject to a charge of £400 as they said they needed to upgrade our bearer. This was never done, so we complained, and they said they would have to charge us £3,000 - the normal installation fee. We pointed them to the contract we signed. Now, instead of sending out a bloke to update the router, or even send out a new router, they have:
* Spliced together 26km of fibre to the exchange.
* Installed a 3rd fibre into our office
* Provided a new NTU
* Provided a new Cisco 3xxx router
* Sent 3 engineers out to do all this

I spoke to one of the Openreach guys - he shrugged and said "that's the way they like to do it". I said "it's ok, we're not having to pay the standard installation fee, just sounds like a waste of time and money though". He also explained what the bearer was (confirming my assumption) and looked pretty confused when I told him BT Local Business insisted that it had to be upgraded to "carry" IPv6 packets.

yesterday
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Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

oobayly Re:Shyeah, right. (273 comments)

I was thinking along the lines of the AC, but I suppose it depends on context - business or personal. I also note that you said you "made" $2,000 - not charged him $2,000 - so I'm going to assume your friend worked out what your time was worth.

I've never asked for money for helping a friend out, but I've been given numerous bottles of wine (including a very nice looking Rioja under my desk), beer and some cash (as my dad once said - refuse twice, then accept). However, I also know to offer my time to people who will appreciate it, and may also be able to help me out in the future.

I have also flat out refused to fix a colleague's home laptop - I'd already fixed it twice (for no reward) and explained to him what to do to prevent his son fucking it up. The 2nd time, I had told him "I never want to see that laptop again in my life". The whole office thought it was hilarious when he tried saying "I'll just leave it on your desk in case you've got time" - my reply was "You bloody well won't, I told you I didn't want to see it again".

yesterday
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Great Firewall of China Blocks Edgecast CDN, Thousands of Websites Affected

oobayly Re:China's internet will become a smaller intranet (128 comments)

I suppose I hadn't thought the CDN content already being cached. Granted, for high volume sites, 100KB will add up, and it's one less (possible more) file for the client to download, but I'm still not massively keen on the idea of the possibility that the library I'm using may have been altered.

I'm aware that I haven't audited the library I downloaded from jQuery, but we've often seen malware being served unwittingly by 3rd parties*. However, I'd also hope that jQuery regularly verify that files served from the CDN haven't been altered, so maybe I should start considering it.

* Basically, if my web server starts serving malware, I'd prefer it's due to my cock-up, not somebody elses, which when I think about it, maybe I should set myself up to blame someone else when the shit hits the fan.

2 days ago
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UK Hotel Adds Hefty Charge For Bad Reviews Online

oobayly Re:Could be solved be VISA, etc. immediately (307 comments)

Ok, one qualification - dealers won't take drafts for trade transactions.

The problem is that bankers drafts can be faked and it does happen. Piston Heads - Fraudulent bankers draft update!!!. The problem is that you'll find out the draft is a fake after releasing a car, calling the bank is useless. As far I can see, fake cash is easier to check than a fake draft.

For example, when I was buying my flat, I had to move money from my Irish account to my UK account, by my bank Ulster Bank (part of RBS) were being a bunch of idiots and wouldn't tell me how long the fast transaction would take. My sister, who luckily works for another bank (I'm not going to mention who), told me to have get a draft, pay it into her account and she'd do the international transfer. However, because the draft would take a couple of days to clear, she however had to act as guarantor.

If a couple of days to clear is "cleared funds", then by that logic, so is a cheque. Go get a draft and try cashing it in a different bank and see how quickly it happens.

2 days ago
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Officer Not Charged In Michael Brown Shooting

oobayly Re:I just don't understand (1087 comments)

Because the US is a bigger country, so 5 times 0 is - let me get my calculator -zero? That can't be right.

Anyhow there's a difference between the UK and Germany and the US. In the UK, police generally don't carry firearms*, we have specialised armed response units**. German police do carry firearms, but clearly aren't that trigger happy. American police, well...

* They do in airports and other heightened security areas.
** Which have had some spectacular fuck ups in the past.

2 days ago
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Officer Not Charged In Michael Brown Shooting

oobayly Re:The "Protesters" (1087 comments)

Probably the annual Labour Day march (1st May), which is probably only going to confirm to you that they're all a bunch of commie bastards who deserve to have their heads kicked in.

2 days ago
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Great Firewall of China Blocks Edgecast CDN, Thousands of Websites Affected

oobayly Re:China's internet will become a smaller intranet (128 comments)

Why would you link to libraries on a remote web server? I this time and again, and have never understood the reasoning.

4 days ago
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Profanity-Laced Academic Paper Exposes Scam Journal

oobayly Re:Not bad, but... (134 comments)

Maybe it's just me, but I really want to know what that Chicken vs Chicken plot actually is. Also the more I look at that paper, the more I think "is that really how chicken is spelt?" - it just doesn't look correct when written so many times.

5 days ago
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Leaked Documents Show EU Council Presidency Wants To Impair Net Neutrality

oobayly Re:Subterranean BS. (76 comments)

I didn't vote for the PM either, and odds are 1 in 650 that he even represents you directly.

* I'm assuming that like me, you live in the UK.

about a week ago
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UK Hotel Adds Hefty Charge For Bad Reviews Online

oobayly Re:Could be solved be VISA, etc. immediately (307 comments)

You'll be lucky if you find a car dealer accepting a bank draft as cleared funds nowadays. I know of several companies that have been burned that way. Same goes for debit cards - we always assumed that they were cleared funds, however after one of our clients paid for a Bentley (trade transaction), some Muppet in the back cancelled the transaction, which meant that the seller was down £60k, the buyer wasn't even at fault.

As a result, we advise people to only release a car when the money is actually in their account, however that's not even guaranteed as we've encountered scams where people attempt to reverse bank transfers.

Short story, there no such thing as cleared funds.

about a week ago
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Philae Lands Successfully On Comet

oobayly Re:Congratulations! (188 comments)

Seeing as it's essentially an electronic device (a big PDA) "thrown" across our solar system, I think think the preferred unit is Campbells

about two weeks ago
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ISPs Removing Their Customers' Email Encryption

oobayly Re:Anti-Spam Measure? (245 comments)

I think you've got it the wrong way round - 465 (SMTPs) is deprecated, 25 is still the standard SMTP port.

about two weeks ago
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LAX To London Flight Delayed Over "Al-Quida" Wi-Fi Name

oobayly Re:This was no AP. (339 comments)

I know, every time I read about something like this I think "these idiots are really opening themselves up for a massive DOS attack". It probably means a whole load of overtime, so maybe that's why they do it.

about a month ago
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Jedi-ism Becomes a Serious Religion

oobayly Re:Worked for me. (268 comments)

Most Buddhists would strongly disagree with you.

But they won't kill you over it.

Or more accurately, like most other religious followers, the majority of Buddhists won't kill you for it. Like every religion, it has followers who are willing to kill for their beliefs - Special Report: Buddhist monks incite Muslim killings in Myanmar

about a month ago
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Jedi-ism Becomes a Serious Religion

oobayly Re:Spiritual Needs (268 comments)

But, but, but, they weren't true Buddhists - true Buddhists wouldn't do something like that!

Because nothing wins an argument like the No True Scotsman fallacy.

about a month ago
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India Successfully Launches Region-Specific Navigation Satellite

oobayly Re:GPS (86 comments)

Not on the Block IIIA Satellites - DoD Permanently Discontinues Procurement Of Global Positioning System Selective Availability. Granted, they're not in the sky yet, but the US military already has the capability to deny GPS to specific areas, so they wouldn't need it anyway.

Remember, it was the FAA that was the force behind deactivating SA. Turning it back on now could well be more dangerous than just denying GPS and issuing a NOTAM.

about a month ago
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Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

oobayly Re:Oh great (549 comments)

How the hell is that 7 word phrase with punctuation (I'll ignore the case, as only the first word is capitalised) susceptible to a dictionary attack?

If I tell you that my password contains 7 words (contained in my /usr/share/dict/words which is 99171 lines long), with a comma after the 3rd and a full stop at the end, you will still have to search through 94,339,343,028,749,422,154,850,189,341,666,091 (9.4E34) combinations - best get cracking. If I'm even nicer to you and tell you that none of the words are repeated, then there are only 94,319,367,837,042,826,040,647,505,756,227,200 (9.4E34). It turns out that when I'm being nice, I'm not being that helpful.

I do use random alphanumeric passwords, because I can remember quite a few of them - it takes a while to remember them and it's massively annoying when I have to change one.

However for my company's keepass file, I use a pass-phrase that is an incorrect quotation from a well know poem - go on, have a guess.

about a month and a half ago
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PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

oobayly Re:but (367 comments)

They're overrated - getting all the spokes out of the carcase is worse than plucking a pheasant any day. Also, the thighs don't tend to have much meat on them.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Some company in Belize tried to trademark "MH17" and "MH370"

oobayly oobayly writes  |  about 4 months ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "The Guardian reports that a company in Belize has filed to trademark MH17 and MH370 — full article on Coconuts Kuala Lumpur. The application MH17 was filed on 17th July 2014 — the same day as the disaster occurred, whereas the application for MH370 was filed on 2nd May 2014 — almost two months after the flight disappeared.

The application for "MH17" was filed on the European Trade Mark and Design Network website, while details for the "MH370" application was found on the Justia Trademarks site.

The scope of the application is also wide ranging:

From conferences, exhibitions and competitions; to education and instruction, and entertainment services (namely, the provision of continuing programmes, segments, movies, and shows delivered by television, radio, satellite and the Internet).

Clearly, this is cynical way of attempting to collect (I hesitate to use the word "earn") money from the reporting of Malaysian Airlines two disasters, however, does this actually have any merit? Seeing as the MH17 trademark application has been filed in Europe — the region from where most of the victims came from, it seems highly unlikely, but past experience tells us that we can't make any assumptions."

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Bruce Willis 'considering iTunes legal action' against Apple

oobayly oobayly writes  |  more than 2 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "It appears that Bruce "Die Hard" Willis isn't too impressed that he can't include his iTunes collection in his estate when he dies.

Bruce Willis, the Hollywood actor, is said to be considering legal action against Apple so he can leave his iTunes music collection to his three daughters.

Such a high profile individual complaining about the ability to own your digital music can only be a good thing, right? I suggest that also assaulting Cupertino in a dirty white vest would do the job."
Link to Original Source

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Arizona drivers say no to Gatso cameras

oobayly oobayly writes  |  more than 4 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "The Daily Telegraph reports that Arizona drivers are ignoring tickets being issued by UK style fixed speeding cameras. It appears that as the fines are not being delivered in person it's possible for them to be ignored as there's no proof of receipt. Judges appear to be agreeing with this (in the US anyway).
Why can't we use the same excuse here in the UK?"

Link to Original Source
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Estate of Philip K. Dick to sue Google.

oobayly oobayly writes  |  more than 4 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "The Daily Telegraph reports that the estate of science fiction author Philip K. Dick is sueing Google for copying the name Nexus Six for their new Android phone. There's no evidence that the estate has trademarked Nexus Six in regards to mobile phones, so what case could they have and what solicitor would take up this case?
As an owner of Philip K. Dick books & an Android developer I never saw the connection (sad but true), and even though Google say it's nothing to do with Do androids dream of electric sheep I see it as a geeky nod to the authors work, essentially memorialising him."

Link to Original Source
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The legality of publishing email addresses.

oobayly oobayly writes  |  about 5 years ago

oobayly (1056050) writes "Like most people I receive a fair amount of chain emails, some humourous, most downright idiotic. No matter how I try educating colleagues, family & friends, I still receive them and am now resigned to the fact that you just can't help some people.
One of my explanations of why forwarding these emails is a bad idea was that they are a perfect harvesting ground for spammers: a very high percentage of the addresses will be live. This, it turned out fell upon deaf ears. If you're stupid enough to believe that Dell will give you a free laptop then you're probably the type of person that believes that a Nigerian general wants to give you $150,000,000 (ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY MILLION DOLLARS!!!!).

As a bit of an experiment, I used a few tools (grep, awk, etc) to parse my Maildir for any emails that appeared to have been forwarded and extracted anything that looked like an email address. As one would imagine there were a good few (thousand) email addresses. Most of these email addresses belong to innocent by-standers. The real culprits are the people who forward them, and it takes only a little more effort to extract only those.

Part of me has decided these people who waste bandwidth, time and have caused me to lose my hair deserve to pay. What better way to do it than to publish their email addresses for spammers to harvest?

Of course, this is unethical, but is it actually illegal? By sending an email urging others to forward the content, are they not actively pushing their details into the public domain?

Answers on postcards please."

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