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Comments

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Google TV 2.0 Review, Tweaks, and Screenshots

pcause Major Flaw in Google TV 2.0 (107 comments)

I saw this demo'ed at CES and Google made a serious mistake in capability. it turns out you can run only a small set of applications available on the market on Google TV 2.0. The reason for the limited selection is that Google TV 2.0 doesn't support touch/multi-touch. I asked the Google TV person why they weren't supporting multi-touch (at least 2 finger touch) from Bluetooth keyboards/keypads that could provide this capability and hence open up pretty much the full market to Google TV 2.0. he said the capability wasn't in the OS/libraries at all because some OEMs - he specifically mentioned Sony - couldn't support it in their devices. What an amazingly stupid decision. Build the capability into the OS and let the manufacturers with half a brain support it. Users will get most of the market apps and developers will have their lives made simpler as opposed to having yet another Android fragmentation issue to deal with. A truly stupid decision.

more than 2 years ago
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Was .NET All a Mistake?

pcause Re:Just a bigger and better framework (688 comments)

The key is that Microsoft is porting Windows to ARM. if you built you app with .Net and MS doesn't screw things up you should have an app that works on the ARM version of Windows 8. If that happens, then for MS and developers the entire .Net experience has been a HUGE win. MS will have a Win 8 ARM with a huge supply of apps and developers and developers will have access to the tablet market without having to do much new.

more than 2 years ago
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Dropbox TOS Includes Broad Copyright License

pcause You are giving them carte blanche (213 comments)

You are giving dropbox the rights to do whatever they want to with your content, according to this. All of thye examples are just that - examples. The terms give them the right to make the judgment on what they want to do. And, since they are free to change the privacy policy at will, just as they changed the TOS, you have no protections.

They can write this much more tightly to protect themselves and give you absolute control. The problem is that to do so it will be very long and "legalese" and not friendly/simple. They should protect their users and the users' intent in choosing the service and do whatever they have to do to deliver what you thought you were getting.

about 3 years ago
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Does Google Pin Copyright Violations On the ASF?

pcause It isn't eveil if it benefits Google (136 comments)

Another example of what "do no evil" really means: if Google benefits it isn't evil, right? Pretty amazing and inept theft of IP on Google's part and for being this inept and stealing so blatantly, Oracle will get billions. Shame that we Android users will have to pay for Google's theft.

more than 3 years ago
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The Fall of Wintel and the Rise of Armdroid

pcause If you don't canabalize your own business (431 comments)

The first rule of technology is that "If you don't canabalize your own business, someone else will do it for you". This is the classic tech product/company dilemna and we have lots of examples of dominant #1's who ignored this rule and are gone. Digital? Wang? Visicorp? Borland?

more than 3 years ago
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Why Flash Is Fundamentally Flawed On Touchscreen Devices

pcause Flash means security problems (521 comments)

Just about every week we see another major security issue caused by a problem with Flash. Adobe isn't serious about security and doesn't know what to do to fix their products. For example, Javascript should be off by default in Reader, but it isn't. Last quarter something like 80% of serious attacks were through holes in Adobe products and the latest issue is with Downloader. Why allow a company and set of products that have shown themselves to be insecure onto the next generation of device where hackers can steal more personal data, run up changers and the like. Apple is trying to make our mobile devices more reliable and more secure than our PCs. It is time to dump Flash.

more than 4 years ago
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Midwest Seeing Red Over 'Green' Traffic Lights

pcause The real world defeats the lab (839 comments)

Amazing, the real world isn't like the lab. And, surprise, all of the theoretical results expected aren't going to be achieved in the real world. This is a great example of theory meeting the real world and should make us pause and reduce our expectations for benefits of going green. Yes, it is a good idea to reduce our energy consumption and carbon footprint. Bu no, we won't get the results in terms of energy savings, reduced emissions and job creation that the ardent proponents are telling us will be achieved and it will take longer than expected. Still worth doing, but don't believe the press releases and promises.

more than 4 years ago
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How Do I Keep My Privacy While Using Google?

pcause You don't (533 comments)

The best solution is not to use Google at all. They are indexing your email and will figure out who you are and who youtalk to about what. Use the calendar and they know where you are. Add the 6 months of browser history and you're screwed.

more than 4 years ago
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Google Launches Public DNS Resolver

pcause This is all about better tracking for Google (540 comments)

If you use this than Google has access to every single site or service you visit or use, even without the browser. For doing behavorial targetting of ads this is key. Most commercial behavior happens outside of the search engine and on a third party site. This gives them some of the ability to do what the folks at Nebuad wanted to achieve by doing deep packet inspection. If you use Google's DNS, they get to do tracking without having to get an ISP agreement and they'll say that your agreement to use implies consent to use the data "for their own use". SInce their use is to sell ads that can be finely targetted, they are in effect gainig the ability to offer an advertiser "for people who search for camera and have visited newegg or amazon..." or "for people who visit planned parenthood, put up this anti-abortion ad".

more than 4 years ago
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Microsoft Security Essentials Released; Rivals Mock It

pcause Re:Symantec Bashing (465 comments)

We used Symantec for years, but it just got too painful and I gave up on Symantec about a year ago. We used the Corporate version and it was slow and a resource hog. My kid's laptop had NAV and it was also a pig. I switched to Avast on the laptop and we're using Trend at work. Why should I give a vendor who for years gave me crappy software a second chance until I know that all of the alternative are worse. You have to earn and KEEP your customers respect and trust and not say "wait til next year". That only works for sports teams.

more than 4 years ago
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Are Long URLs Wasting Bandwidth?

pcause The search engine problem with short URLs (379 comments)

One of the issues with shortening URLs is that the search engines look at the URL and the words present in the URL to determine how to rank the URL. This works against the desire to shorten. For example having: "baseball/redsox/beckett" is important to get a higher ranking.

more than 5 years ago
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Network Neutrality Defenders Quietly Backing Off?

pcause WSJ not confused, Google trying to confuse (171 comments)

If you read Google's response, it is pretty clear that they are trying to obfuscate the issue. What they are talking about is paying to put servers and data inside the ISPs and so gain an advantage for their content. This is exactly the scheme that AT&T proposed and Google condemned. Their reply is a technical splitting of hairs and a diversion. Cache end servers, etc, is all just "we want our data to have higher access and priority and will pay for it". Admit it Google, you're busted.

What the Google reply really is, is an attempt to save face and avoid admitting that if they can gain business advantage, Google will dump "principle" for profit, just like every other corporation. They are afraid that this episode will expose their "do no evil" as merely a marketing slogan intended to fool folks. Busted.

Well, now that they've admitted that it all about money, maybe they can use the AdSense bidding system to help Governors automate the selling of Senate seats too!

more than 5 years ago
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Obama's Mobile Phone Records Compromised, Shared

pcause This points out the problem with ehealthcare (278 comments)

There has been a lot of talk about "automating" our health care and records as part of a move to Universal health care. This example of employees improperly accessing phone records should be cautionary when we think about automating health care records. We need to have logs of all access to anyone's records. We need to have strong security models and patient notification of any and all access to records. And, we need to change the law so that the media *MUST* reveal the source of any information leaked from unauthorized records. I know the first amendment folks will cringe at any requirements of disclosure, but the press has no rights to access or publish this kind of information, especially when the government forces us to provide it.

more than 5 years ago
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Yahoo CEO Jerry Yang To Step Down

pcause Jerry is too nice to be CEO (199 comments)

I know Jerry and he is smart and insightful, but way too nice to be a CEO in an industry where he has to compete against SOBs like Ballmer and Schmidt. Jerry is polite and considerate. He is thoughtful and modest. The other guys are rude, arrogant, aggressive, nasty folk.

Jerry did a lot of useful changes, but what he didn't get that it is all about perception of being a leader and being on the path upward. A lot of the issue for the market is PR versus reality. And, let face it, search and search advertising are the things the market views as keys to future success and Yahoo has fallen further behind in this area. The decision to outsource search to Google by Yahoo may prove to be one of the top 5 greatest business mistakes of all time and Jerry has to share blame for that as well.

Jerry didn't move boldly enough, but his Board should have known that his base style wouldn't allow it. He should have reorg'ed immediately and publicly, giving folks ownership and accountability. You get the job but you get fired if you don't hit the goals. He let key services stagnate. Yahoo mail took too long to fix their UI to match Google and Yahoo still charges for POP access. Yahoo was the calendar leader, but Google launches a slightly better calendar and is viewed as the leader, even without a customer base. Yahoo Groups is a leader but is old and stale compared to something like Ning. There are lots of examples of how to upgrade their services out there for Yahoo and they seem to ignore them and let others steal mind share and leadership from them.

I fear that it is too late. Yahoo is the AOL of Web 2.0. It is only a matter of time.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Pinterest doesn't qualify for DMCA Safe Harbor

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 2 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "There has been a lot of press about Pinterest and copyright infringement. Pinterest says that they are protected by the DMCA Safe Harbor provisions, but is this true? Many point to Youtube, but there is a crucial difference. With Pinterest (and Facebook too) the company's code/servers go and directly get the images off of pages that have copyright notices. There is actual work to find the images and retrieve them but that same work could easily spot the copyright notices and not provide images from copyrighted pages. Youtube received files from users and wasn't involved in actually extracting the files and hence was more like email. They did noting active to obtain the images.

Am I wrong? Isn't it like me being pointed to a copyrighted magazine by someone and cutting out the pictures and using them to publish my own magazine?"
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facebook is tracking you when you're logged out

pcause pcause writes  |  about 2 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "According to this article and apparently confirmed by a Facebook engineer, even when you are logged out of facebook they are still tracking you. The quoted engineer explains that this tracking is only for security related purposes. Maybe, but the bigger question is does this need to be disclosed and does it violate an implied contract with web users as to what logging out means?"
Link to Original Source
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Third party cookies and web tracking

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 2 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "Most of the consumer web tracking is done by third party cookies. An ad network or ad targetting service puts cookies on your system to watch where you go and uses this ti figure out what to give you for ads and to build a profile. All of the major browsers have the ability to block third party cookies. The question is why they do't make this the default behavior, as doing so would immediately reduce unwanted tracking, especially if Flash respected this setting."
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"Do no evil" - but only if it doesn't cost us $$

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 2 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "The WSJ reports that Larry Page knew Google was running illegal ads, but went for the money over what was legal and right. From the article — "Larry Page knew what was going on," Peter Neronha, the Rhode Island U.S. Attorney who led the probe, said in an interview. "We know it from the investigation. We simply know it from the documents we reviewed, witnesses that we interviewed, that Larry Page knew what was going on."

Google is as greedy and corrupt as anyone other big company."

Link to Original Source
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Gee, you mean I don't own my own contacts/friends?

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 3 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "Google recently stopped Facebook from importing contacts from Gmail, as this article from Wired discusses. All very interesting, but isn't the real issue that the list of my friends doesn't and shouldn't belong to Google, Facebook or anyone else. Isn't this mine and shouldn't I have control of who can have access? After all, by this logic Google could claim to own my email messages."
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Maybe the motto should be "Don't be arrogant"

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 3 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "Here is yet more proof of the arrogance of the leadership of Google. Eric Schmidt says that if you don't like Street View taking your picture, move! Wow, this guy really doesn't have any clue about civility, privacy and just how to keep his mouth shut when his brain has something dumb to say."
Link to Original Source
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Why is Google supporting Flash?

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "Google seems to have rushed to Adobe's defense and has added Flash to Chrome and is adding it to Android. The question is: why" Flash is a big security issue Web browsers,seems to need more patching that IE6, and is proprietary. Google has usually been a champion of standards and openness and has created a lot of great Web UIs with JavaScript. Given JavaScript and HTML5 there aren't many things we'll need Flash for and from a security point of view, we're better off without it.

Why is Google so eager to champion Flash as opposed to a set of standards they, Apple and Microsoft *all* agree on?"
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Google trying to scare us out of optin

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "This article in Ars Technica discussed a proposal by a Virginia Congressman to give you back control of your privacy and make use of your personal and behavioral information opt-in. This scares the pants off of Google and they are trying to scare us with stories of how horrible the Internet will be if we have privacy. It will be terrible for Google's business, as they make more money the more they abuse your privacy, and they make a LOT of money!"
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"Highly Confidential" Google docs say - Do Evil

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "The latest documents released by Viacom show that Google knew that Youtube was "completely sustained by pirated content" before Google bought it. Of course, the docs that say this were labeled "highly confidential". I am sure that Google will say this is all old stuff, taken out of context and that they didn't have sex with that woman, Ms, Lewinsky. Sure."
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You call this cloud privacy?

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "Google and a coalition of tech companies want to create legal protections against the government accessing you content in the cloud. Of course, they aren't proposing any restrictions on how *THEY* can use you content, location information and the like to make more $$ and further violate your privacy. Unregulated, nontransparent and unaccountable corporate entities saying they are to be trusted. Ken Lay of Enron would love these guys."
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Youtube *was*evil, and Google knew

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "Silicon Alley Insider has the most damning evidence released in the Viacom/YouTube suit. It seems clear from these snippets that YouTube knew it was pirating content and did it to grow fast and sell for a lot of $$. It also seems clear that Google knew the site was pirated content and bought it and continued the pirating."
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Eric Schmidt to user - It is all your fault

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "Seems that Eric Schmidt thinks that there was nothing wrong with Buzz and that it was just "confused" users that were the problem. Just when they begin to dig out of the mess, the CEO blames the users for being clueless instead of taking responsibility for a mistake that has forever shown that Google's "do no evil" was, to quote Steve Jobs, "bulls**t". Users understood that Google was violating our privacy to advance its business. He is right that we didn't udnerstand one thing at all — why these privacy violations for Google's profits were good for us."
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Time for a Bill of Rights for email accounts?

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "With Google demonstrating a disregard for the privacy of your email account is it time for legislation to protect your email account? Should the following be basic email rights:

- You are the owner of any email you receive, subject to copyright of the sender

- Your email content cannot be accessed or scanned other than for the purpose of preventing spam and malware

- The people who you correspond with is private information and cannot be used or shared in any way by a third party with the exception that an address book may be created for the sole benefit and use of the individual creating it. No use of the address book may be made without explicit opt in agreement of the user

- A company cannot ask you to waive these rights

- The FTC Can issue regulations about email, but all regulation must to the maximum reasonable extent be aimed at protecting consumer email privacy. Courts should interpret the intent of legislation to be to protect consumer email privacy to the maximum practical extent

This let's free email services still advertise and perform spam prevention, but it stops snooping and other creepy practices and accidental/intentional use of our private information to help some else improve their business results."

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Your location data, government access and privacy

pcause pcause writes  |  more than 4 years ago

pcause (209643) writes "The Department of Justice doesn't think it needs a warrant to get access to your location data. I know everyone's first reaction is outrage but most of you with a smartphone and applications are sharing your location data with random apps so they can feed you ads, providing it to Google for maps and search, Foursquare for check ins and much more. Why in the world would anyone who shares their application data so widely have any expectation of privacy of the data or, for that matter, privacy at all?

We all hate Big Brother, but maybe the biggest threat to our privacy comes not from the government but from ourselves and the unregulated commercial entities we give access to all of this data without ever reading the TOS, or really having a clue what those folks can and will do with the data."

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