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Cisco Complains To Obama About NSA Adding Spyware To Routers

pdclarry Re:Details? (297 comments)

I don't know if we ever will receive the precise details of this NSA operation, but I would still like to know:

1) How was the integrity of the shipping chain tainted? At which point NSA grabbed the devices and who allowed them to do this?

2) What does this "spyware" do, and does this mean a modified system firmware or something else?

Most of that is covered in Greenwald's book, and also in the NSA documents that have been released. The specific physical interception point is not described, but the modified firmware is. Once the router goes into service it "phones home" periodically and allows NSA to send monitoring instructions.

about 7 months ago
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Yahoo DMARC Implementation Breaks Most Mailing Lists

pdclarry Google Groups also (83 comments)

I just received a private communication from the moderator of a Google Group. He says that mail from Yahoo members is being blocked by Comcast and Yahoo. Now that it's Google's ox being gored perhaps something will be done about it.

about 8 months ago
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Yahoo DMARC Implementation Breaks Most Mailing Lists

pdclarry Re:Back when the Internet Mail Consortium was a th (83 comments)

The thing to do here is to fix the MLM software to use the correct additional headers, rather than rewriting the headers the DMARC policy feels are important; in addition, this would allow the DMARC policy to "whitelist" based on the attached headers, assuming everything else wasn't a black mark, and avoid the "greylisting" that would happen ordinarily with most SPAM filtering systems in "medium posture" rather than "low posture" (i.e. the ones that have the concept of "suspect email" as a middle ground).

I think you will find that most MLM software uses correct additional headers. At least listserv and mailman (for the lists that I manage) do. We've been playing nicely with ISPs for years on our lists, we create no spam (once we fixed the bounceback spam problem 3 years ago) and generally are among the more well-behaved email users around. The problem is that Yahoo's implementation of DMARC is not using the additional headers. All it looks at is From.

about 8 months ago
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Yahoo DMARC Implementation Breaks Most Mailing Lists

pdclarry Re:Am I understanding this correctly? (83 comments)

It's not blocking relayed mail in the usual sense. Most mailing lists use the original poster's email address as the FROM field so everyone on the list knows who posted the message. The SENDER field contains the actual list address. And that should match the sending server's IP address. So reverse DNS and SPF (and DKIM if enabled) will validate the SENDER as the list server software. The REPLY TO will be either the list or the original poster, depending on list policy. DMARC requires that the FROM field also match the sending server, and ignores SPF and DKIM.

about 8 months ago
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US Carriers Said To Have Rejected Kill Switch Technology Last Year

pdclarry Re:Totally pointless. (197 comments)

The second way, and probably a preferable one, is to make the bricking recoverable by the end user, who must enter a password that they chose for their phone to unbrick the device. The password should not be of any pre-determinable length so that a hacker who wanted to unbrick the phone would not even know what the domain to try to guess the password by brute force might be. Ideally, such a password should not get reset simply by changing the sim card in the device, and changing it would require that the old password be entered first.

A bricked phone would be utterly useless for virtually any task... even using the apps that might be installed on it... the only thing it would be able to do is call emergency/911, which would remove much of the incentive to bother to steal phones.

That's exactly the way Activation Lock on the iPhone works. The lock is actually in Apple's activation servers and tied to the owner's iCloud ID and password, so wiping the phone does not get around the lock. When its serial number attempts to re-activate the phone it fails to activate. The only way around it is to know the owner's Apple ID and password. So having a secure password is an essential element in securing an iPhone, iPad or Mac (Activation lock works with all of them).

about 10 months ago
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Reason To Hope Carriers Won't Win the War On Netflix

pdclarry Re:Faster to AWS than Linode (213 comments)

I'm on FIOS with their 50 down/25 up plan. Linode in Newark is 48Mbps, AWS East is 60Mbps. Just saying that a particular path is slow doesn't mean that it's Verizon interfering - it's more likely something else that's causing the problem.

I was able to duplicate your results with my FIOS 50 down/35 up plan). Speed to AWS was FASTER than the benchmark speed test (60 Mbps for AWS, 48 for the benchmark, 50 Mbps for Linode). If this is throttling they're doing it wrong. I repeated it several times and got similar results.

about 10 months ago
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Developers Rolling Out Pebble Smartwatch Apps

pdclarry Re:I don't (64 comments)

If you want a gimmick watch Casio will do you a nice one for about $30 but I have to warn you that the days of digital watches being cool ended in about 1980 so you won't be getting any Hipsters putting down their skinny lattes in shock and envy by buying a Pebble either.

"The days of the digital [watch] are numbered"
                      - Tom Stoppard, the original script of The Real Thing
                          (he dropped the line in later revisions)

about a year and a half ago
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Ancient Teeth Bacteria Record Disease Evolution

pdclarry Re:humans (97 comments)

Correct; In the wild each set of teeth lasts about 10 years, because there's a lot of silica in the grasses that are an elephant's primary diet. Elephants in captivity can live longer because their diet is less abrasive to their teeth.

about 2 years ago
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Ancient Teeth Bacteria Record Disease Evolution

pdclarry Re:humans (97 comments)

why do humans have more oral problems compared to other species in nature?

Could it be because we live longer than other species? By the time I had my first cavity my dog was dead.

It's not even clear that we have more oral problems than other species. My current cat has serious dental disease. And elephants, if they aren't killed by us or disease, usually die indirectly of dental deterioration; their teeth wear out, then can no longer chew, and they die of starvation. Usually around the age of 60.

about 2 years ago
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iOS 6.1 Leads To Battery Life Drain, Overheating For iPhone Users

pdclarry This is a non-story; I guess it was a slow news da (266 comments)

The issues with 6.1 are no different from scattered reports of issues for every release of iOS that has ever come out. There are a few phones after each release that eat battery fast or have other problems, and there are easy solutions posted on many sites as well as Apple support fora. No problems with iOS 6.1 on my phone.

about 2 years ago
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NYC Police Gathering Cellphone Logs

pdclarry Re:In other words... (122 comments)

Well, there's more to it than that if you read far enough into the story. The police subpoena phone records by phone number, not IMEI. So if the victim transfers the number to another phone the victim's calls are in the database, not the thief's.

about 2 years ago
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Cisco Pricing Undercut By $100M In Big Cal State University Network Project

pdclarry Maybe it was a mistake... (220 comments)

I haven't seen the suggestion yet that Cisco may have just made a calculation error or misread the specs. Likewise for Alcatel. Both the high and low numbers seem out of line to me. The remaining bids are in the middle, closer to each other. Probably where they should be.

more than 2 years ago
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Why Aircraft Carriers Still Rule the Oceans

pdclarry Re:Not sure about the thesis of the article, but.. (718 comments)

Interesting question, but since the advent of the Essex class carrier in 1941 no US carrier of Essex class or later has ever been sunk. USS Intrepid in the course of WW II took a torpedo and 5 Kamikaze hits at different times, and was repaired and back in service weeks after each attack.

more than 2 years ago
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Why Aircraft Carriers Still Rule the Oceans

pdclarry Re:Not sure about the thesis of the article, but.. (718 comments)

Carriers are also:
* Mobile hospitals.
* Mobile power generation units.
* Mobile food services.
And I'm sure that people here can think of a few more. Carriers cannot be fully replaced.

This is a really good point, and the most common use of carriers in the US fleet. Also for providing fresh water in emergencies (such as Haiti), as mentioned in a followup post.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Not Linux For Security?

pdclarry Knee-jerk responses (627 comments)

I've read through the comments thus far, and no one has pointed out the absurdity of the original question, if cloud storage isn't allowed why don't businesses use Linux? What does the choice of operating system have to do with essentially exposing data outside of the corporate firewall? Cloud storage and choice of operating system have nothing to do with each other. All that have appeared are the usual knee-jerk responses defending or attacking various operating systems.

more than 2 years ago
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Sleeping iPhones Send Phantom Data

pdclarry Re:Who cares about 3G usage? (248 comments)

If that were the case then the charges would appear whether the phone was off or on. But if the phone is turned off the charges do not appear until after the phone is turned back on.

more than 4 years ago
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Is That Sushi Hazardous To Your Health?

pdclarry Re:Endangered species? No (554 comments)

Also this article came out almost a year ago in the NYT this is old news(!)

It was a different study reported in the NYT a year ago. This new study was published in August. There is a link in the original post above to the year old story.

about 5 years ago
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Shockwave Vulnerabilities Affect More Than 450 Million Systems

pdclarry But there's already a patch (130 comments)

As there are over a billion computers with Windows vulnerabilities and countless other "at risk" applications that get patched regularly this doesn't sound like a situation all that out of the ordinary. And as with Windows some users will update and some will remain at risk.

more than 5 years ago
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Were Neanderthals Devoured By Humans?

pdclarry Re:there is no good definition of "species" (502 comments)

The problem is that undergraduate bio, like undergraduate calculus, has to oversimplify because you need to understand more advanced concepts before the basic concepts are clear. There are excellent definitions of "species" that are understood by biologists. The details are of interest primarily to evolutionary biologists, but a reading of almost any work by Ernst Mayr will reveal to you how scientists define species.

Given that, most of your points are irrelevant, because the scientific definitions take them into account. You can eliminate most of them by simply noting that a mating between fertile members of the community with the other sex is a condition for the definition. Scientists think this is so obvious they don't bother to state it.

The one point that scientists disagree on is whether two individuals that could produce viable offspring but don't because their environments don't overlap are the same species. One of Mayr's examples is domestic dogs and wolves. One lives in the wild, the other in your house, so their environments don't overlap. So they may or may not be the same species. Another is animals that live on different continents. These are frequently called different species because they will evolve independently, and even if they could produce viable offspring today at some point in the future they probably couldn't.

Asexual organisms have a different definition of species; the one you learned in biology is only for organisms that reproduce sexually. Likewise for parthenogenesis.

more than 5 years ago
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Air Force One Flyby Causes Brief Panic In NYC

pdclarry Re:And who evacuated ? (898 comments)

One of the evacuated buildings is called "The World Financial Center" - does that sound a little familiar?

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Cisco complains to Obama about NSA adding spyware to routers

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about 7 months ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "Glenn Greenwald's book No Place to Hide reveals that the NSA intercepts shipments of networking gear destined for overseas and adds spyware. Cisco has responded by asking the President to intervene and stop this practice, as it has severely hurt their non-US business, with shipments to other countries falling from 7% for emerging countries to over 25% for Brazil and Russia."
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AOL finally admits they were hacked

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about 8 months ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "Anyone managing email servers or lists has suspected for several weeks a major hack of AOL's servers, based on a sudden spurt in spam ostensibly from AOL email addresses (but actually spoofed) and sent to the contact lists of those AOL accounts. Of course, there is a steady stream of such spam from hacked individual accounts on many services, but the magnitude and suddenness of the most recent spam attack argues against individual account invasions.

Well, AOL has finally come clean. Apparently individuals unknown accessed AOL's servers and took screen names, account information including mailing addresses, contact lists, encrypted passwords and encrypted answers to security questions. And possibly credit card information. AOL claims that it affects "only" 2% of their members, but recommends that everyone change their passwords and security questions."
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Yahoo DMARC implementation breaks most mailing lists

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about 8 months ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "On April 8 Yahoo implemented a new DMARC policy that essentially bars any Yahoo user from accessing mailing lists hosted anywhere except on Yahoo and Google. While Yahoo is the initiator, it also affects Comcast, ATT, Rogers, SBGlobal and several other ISPs. Internet Engineering Council expert John R. Levine, specialing in email infrastructure and spam filtering claimed in a post “Yahoo breaks every mailing list in the world including the IETF's.” on the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) list.

DMARC (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance) is a two year old proposed standard previously discussed on Slashdot that is intended to curb email abuse, including spoofing an phishing. Unfortunately, as implemented by Yahoo, it claims most mailing list users as collateral damage. Messages posted to mailing lists (including listserv, mailman, majordomo, etc) by Yahoo subscribers are blocked when the list forwards them to other Yahoo (and other participating ISP's) subscribers. List members not using Yahoo or its partners are not affected and will receive posts from Yahoo users. And posts from non-Yahoo users are delivered to Yahoo members. So essentially those suffering the most are Yahoo's (comcast's, att's, etc) own customers. Hacker News has details about why DMARC has this affect on mailing lists. Their best proposed solution is to ban Yahoo email users from mailing lists and encourage them to switch to other ISPs. Unfortunately, it isn't just Yahoo, although they are getting the most attention."
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Microwave your iPhone to charge it? People fall for this hoax!

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about a year and a half ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "As reported by Knight News, A series of posts on the Internet claim that you can charge your iphone by microwaving it for 1 minute. Apparently some users have fallen for it, despite Snopes debunking the claim. There's even been a post Apple's support forums, perhaps showing that you can't underestimate the intelligence of Internet users. Don't try this at home, folks."
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Internet payment processor Liberty Reserve accused of laundering $6 Bn

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about a year and a half ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "Liberty Reserve, apparently the Internet bank of choice for criminals, as reported by NY Times and other sources including Wired and Business Week, has been shut down. Liberty Reserve, incorporated in Costa Rica in 2006, “facilitated global criminal conduct” and was created and structured “as a criminal business venture, one designed to help criminals conduct illegal transactions and launder the proceeds of their crimes,” Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in an indictment unsealed today. The Liberty Reserve site has been seized by the US government. Chatter on criminal web sites show a rising sense of panic as fortunes have disappeared in an instant."
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iPhone "Do Not Disturb" bug hit on January 1

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about 2 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "As reported in The Guardian and Apple support forums As of January 1 the Do Not Disturb feature of the iPhone's iOS 6 does not turn off. One forum member did an analysis that shows that the bug recurs for several days at the beginning of each year in coming years if not fixed.

Just to add to the embarrassment, Apple chose Wednesday to launch a new advert promoting the iPhone's Do Not Disturb feature. (Replete with tennis's Williams sisters.)"
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The Whole Six (or is that Nine) Yards

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about 2 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "I'm sure all of us wonder where "the whole nine yards" expression came from, and many of us have argued one or more of the hypotheses (WW II ammo belt length, American football reference, fabric in a kilt, capacity of a transit mixer...). Well, the latest research now says that it has no origin. (paywall warning): The NY Times covers the story, referencing the Yale Alumni Magazine source.

Interesting discovery is that there's been phrase inflation (it was originally "The Whole Six Yards") and that it has no specific reference in real life. Of course, this most recent discovery probably will not end the argument that Linguist Ben Zimmer says is “something of a Holy Grail among word sleuths.” Indeed, there are already new hypotheses posted in comments to the Yale Alumni Magazine article."
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DMCA updates for 2013: jailbreaking, personal copies of DVDs illegal

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about 2 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "Updates to DMCA regulations effective January 1, 2013 again make jailbreaking iPhones illegal and ban making personal copies of DVDs, along with other seemingly arbitrary changes. You also will not be able to legally hack your game console."
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Married gay couple's engagement photo used in anti-gay political campaign

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  more than 2 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "Two years ago Tom and Brian decided to marry, and were legally married in Connecticut. One of their treasures was an engagement photo showing them with the Brooklyn Bridge in the background. They recently found out that the photograph had been altered and affixed to an anti-gay political ad used to attack a state Senate candidate in Colorado.

The couple has threatened a lawsuit over the misuse of their photograph."

Link to Original Source
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Apple store refuses to sell iPad to Iranian-American woman

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  more than 2 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "An Iranian-American teenager was told by an Apple store employee that they could not sell her an iPad because it would violate US trade restrictions. She returned to the store with a camera crew from a local TV station and was again turned down.

Apparently an Apple employee heard her speaking Farsi. As he was also of Iranian extraction he recognized the language and used this as a basis for refusal."

Link to Original Source
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Is that sushi hazardous to your health?

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  about 5 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "A recent study by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History and Columbia University found that a piece of tuna sushi may not be tuna at all; "A piece of tuna sushi has the potential to be an endangered species, a fraud or a health hazard,” wrote the authors. “All three of these cases were uncovered in this study.”

The study published in PLOSONE examined 68 samples of tuna sushi purchased from 31 restaurants in Manhattan (New York City) and Denver, Colorado. Some of these were from endangered species, others were not as labeled, and some one not tuna at all. Of these last 5 samples labeled as "white tuna" were from a toxic fish, Escolar, which is a gempylid species banned for sale in Italy and Japan due to health concerns. "It can cause gastrointestinal symptoms range from mild and rapid passage of oily yellow or orange droplets, to severe diarrhea with nausea and vomiting. The milder symptoms have been referred to as keriorrhea [i.e. flow of wax in Greek]."

Fraud in sushi is not new; Slashdot also reported study on mislabeling in 2008.. This new study shows that some sushi can actually make you sick. The study was also reported in Wired."

Link to Original Source
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Lawsuit claims top iPhone games stole user data

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  more than 5 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "Storm8, a maker of some top iPhone games, stole user's mobile phone numbers according to a suit filed on November 4. The story was reported in this story in The Register. The complaint claims best-selling games made by Storm8 contained secret code that bypassed safeguards built into the iPhone to prevent the unauthorized snooping of user information. This is not new; there have been other reports of applications copying personally identifiable customer information."
Link to Original Source
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Air Force One flyby causes brief panic in NYC

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  more than 5 years ago

pdclarry writes "A Boeing 747 that serves as an Air Force One backup and two F-16 fighters escorting it caused a brief panic among office workers at the World Financial Center in lower Manhattan this morning, as large numbers evacuated the buildings. The incident was also reported by The Wall Street Journal and New York Times, which also reported evacuations in Jersey City across the Hudson River from Manhattan."
Link to Original Source
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"Atomic Ed" Grothus dies at age 85

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  more than 5 years ago

pdclarry (175918) writes "Anti-nuclear activist and proprietor of the Black Hole surplus store in Los Alamos, Ed Grothus, died on February 12 according to this belatedly reported story in the Wall Street Journal (temporary link). Ed started out as a machinist at the Los Alamos lab, the facility that created the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. During his tenure he became a vocal critic of nuclear weapons development, first founding an anti-nuclear church. He later started buying up surplus items from the labs at the frequent auctions, and opened a store in an old supermarket building in Los Alamos. The store is stacked floor to ceiling, aisle after supermarket aisle, with mostly obsolete electronic junk. The name says it; what goes in rarely goes out; many of his customers are looking for props for movies. Here is a video taken a few years ago. There are a number of tributes posted: Telstar Logistics, BoingBoing, Democracy for New Mexico."
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Did iPhone crash AT&T EDGE Network?

pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  more than 7 years ago

pdclarry writes "Numerous reports on the Apple iPhone forum point to a failure of AT&T's (formerly Cingular's) EDGE network for several hours today (July 2). The reports are all anecdotal and are scattered, with several iPhone owners claiming to have spoken to tech support personnel who confirmed the outages. Originally it was reported to be a West Coast problem, but reports have also appeared from other parts of the country. There have been no official statements as yet from Apple or AT&T. Other sites have picked up on the rumors, but no official word as yet.

Of course, this problem (if real) could be coincidence, but coupled with other stories today that over twice as many iPhones were sold over the weekend as industry analysts expected point to all of those iPhone surfers."
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pdclarry pdclarry writes  |  more than 7 years ago

pdclarry writes "The NY Times reports that researchers have identified a number of vulnerabilities in Vista. The Times article states, "Microsoft is facing an early crisis of confidence in the quality of its Windows Vista operating system as computer security researchers and hackers have begun to find potentially serious flaws in the system...On Dec. 15, a Russian programmer [as reported by Slashdot] posted a description of a flaw that makes it possible to increase a user's privileges on all of the company's recent operating systems, including Vista. And over the weekend a Silicon Valley computer security firm said it had notified Microsoft that it had also found that flaw, as well as five other vulnerabilities, including one serious error in the software code underlying the company's new Internet Explorer 7 browser."

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