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Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

peppepz Re: 503 (354 comments)

Google has a dominant position (among other places) in the browser market so site owners can't disregard their imposition. Saying that you can install other browsers would have been just like saying "you can install another OS" when Microsoft played leverage games with their near monopoly on the desktop back in the times. Plus, Chrome tends to end up installed on the PCs of many unexperienced users because of their policy of aggressive bundling. So one can expect that a relevant portion of his site's visitors will be using Chrome in the foreseeable future no matter what.

yesterday
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Man Caught Trying To Sell Plans For New Aircraft Carrier

peppepz Re: Standard FBI followup (388 comments)

That's because the law doesn't say "you can own guns full stop", it will say something like "you can own guns as specified by law", so lower-level laws can be passed to regulate the ownership of guns without violating the constitution. But no person or government agency can decide that you can't own a gun without having a law that backs their decision.

You are right in the fact that most constitutions, and probably that of the USA too, comprise some kind of exceptional procedures allowing the government to override the rule of law in the case of an emergency. I think that they're required in order to deal with those cases such as angry people with pitchforks burning down cities etc, something that still happened once in a while in the past century, but I don't expect those procedures to have been applied often nowadays.

about two weeks ago
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Man Caught Trying To Sell Plans For New Aircraft Carrier

peppepz Re: Standard FBI followup (388 comments)

You can't waive your right to state provided legal counsel: you can decline to accept one when you're offered, but you can't sign a piece of paper saying that from that moment on you won't be offered any if you get into a trial.

And I don't think people have the *right* to lie: having a right to something doesn't mean having the permission to do that thing, it means that there's some law stating explicitly that that something must be given to those who haven't got it.

Anyway, I was wrong in my post above: there appears to be no explicit law against entrapment, if I understand correctly it's just a matter of interpretation by the courts, which has oscillated over the course of years.

about two weeks ago
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Man Caught Trying To Sell Plans For New Aircraft Carrier

peppepz Re: Standard FBI followup (388 comments)

In countries under the rule of law, rights can not be given up. Just like a law cannot override the constitution, any piece of paper you might sign or be forced to sign cannot override the law. Not even in the case of the most obvious scum of mankind. That's because once you set up the principle that the government can selectively take away your rights, then the citizens can by the same principle selectively ignore the laws they don't like. Including those that define and give authority to the government.

about two weeks ago
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Two Google Engineers Say Renewables Can't Cure Climate Change

peppepz Re:Deliberate (652 comments)

The cost of building *everything* in China is at least 1/3, with well-known results, such as extreme pollution.

That the trade union of nuclear professionals advocates for nuclear power is unsurprising, grant me this consideration.

The wikipedia link that you pointed me to says that China has intentions to bring nuclear power usage to 6% in 2020 up from its current 2% whereas the regulated US were at 19% last year, and the hyper-regulated France was at 75%.

Conclusion: nuclear blossoms in social-democratic countries with a strong central government that invests large amounts of taxpayers' money as subsidies to the industry (or owns it directly).

And thorium reactors are nice, except that they have problems too, the biggest one being of course that they currently do not exist in a profitable form, while nuclear power fundamentalists regularly mention them as the obvious, current solution for every woe of nuclear power.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a nuclear power proponent myself, especially after I've seen the damages done by supposedly green energy sources and their governmental subsidy policies. I just don't like echo chambers.

about three weeks ago
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Two Google Engineers Say Renewables Can't Cure Climate Change

peppepz Re:Deliberate (652 comments)

The high costs of nuclear are driven by non technical issues.

If that were true, we'd be seeing nuclear power plants flowering under authoritarian regimes, whose leaders need not worry about public opinion. Or, we'd see them abund in turbo-capitalist countries, where rich people, or associations thereof, can buy legislation and will do so on every occasion when there's money to be made.

If the effective cost of nuclear power isn't limited to the bill of materials of the power plant and the cost of the finished, ready to employ fuel, it's because of reality, not because of tree-huggers.

about three weeks ago
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Ars Dissects Android's Problems With Big Screens -- Including In Lollipop

peppepz Re:Timely (103 comments)

True, but what about mid-complexity applications, such as office productivity or file management? I'm not convinced that modern (and Modern) UIs really make the "getting to know how to use it" part any faster for them. Why, when I use Office, I often find myself asking the web search engine from a Microsoft competitor about where the designers have hidden some function. For instance, in Access 2007 they hid document-relative actions amid the program-relative options inside what old-schoolers would call a "menu hierarchy" which was visually attached to a pulsating globe in a corner of the screen. In Windows 8, they went a step further and hid fundamental actions, such as "turn off the pc", or "put away everything that I'm working on and switch to the last Modern-style application that I have used", behind esoteric mouse gestures that give the user no visual clue about how to trigger them before he has actually performed them, and very little clue about what's going on aftern he's performed them (possibly by mistake).

Of course, it's also possible that I'm getting old.

about a month ago
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GNOME Project Seeks Donations For Trademark Battle With Groupon

peppepz Re:If this were ten years ago, I would have (268 comments)

No,

No? From the message:

at this point in time I'd advocate against Mozilla, Libreoffice, XFCE or LXDE to switch to GTK 3. They value their independence from GNOME too much.

My comment didn't contain any statement of value about GTK3 or GNOME, so I can't understand the rest of your message about being dickish, lazy, Enlightenment looking bad, me forcing other people to solve my problems, and so on. Perhaps you're talking in general about the attitude you perceive here on slashdot towards GNOME 3, but then if you do that in reply to a message of mine, you make it look like I said any of the stuff you're talking about. Which is not the case.

about a month ago
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GNOME Project Seeks Donations For Trademark Battle With Groupon

peppepz Re:If this were ten years ago, I would have (268 comments)

Which is why at this point in time I'd advocate against Mozilla, Libreoffice, XFCE or LXDE to switch to GTK 3. They value their independence from GNOME too much.

What's the difference between "I advocate against projects that value their independence from GNOME to use GTK 3" and "I don't want you to use GTK 3 outside of GNOME"?

about a month ago
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Russia Takes Down Steve Jobs Memorial After Apple's Tim Cook Comes Out

peppepz Times change (430 comments)

In Soviet Russia, trampling workers' rights gets you a monument, having a gay friend (?) gets it to be demolished.

about a month and a half ago
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Dangerous Vulnerability Fixed In Wget

peppepz Re:super user (58 comments)

It's not enough to download some files: in order to be susceptible to the attack, those devices should download stuff as root in recursive mode from a compromised ftp server. I honestly can't see that happening in reality.

(But then again I wouldn't believe that home routers could be sold with an internet-facing backdoor open by default in their stock firmware, until that happened.)

about a month and a half ago
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Building All the Major Open-Source Web Browsers

peppepz Re:Building should not be complex. (106 comments)

(cmake is probably the best, since it's more portable than autoconf).

As a user of autoconfed packages, I find autoconf superior to cmake. Packages built with autoconf have standardized mechanisms for uninstallation (a cmake package may generate an install-manifest file, an uninstall target, or none of the two), to specify where to put documentation, for cross-compilation, and to fine-tune the build and the installation. With cmake, I can't even tell the package where to install libraries (most packages will allow you to do it, but each package has a different standard about the way to be told); with autoconf, I can even specify a sed to be run on the name of the installed binaries (useful if different packages provide different implementations of the same binary) and still have the installed package work. Also, with cmake packages building both static and dynamic libraries at the same time is usually impossible.

Moreover, modern autoconf scripts are (relatively) easy to debug and patch when they don't work; cmake scripts are more scattered and they're written in an obscure mainframish language.

That said, I imagine that using autoconf on non-posix systems might be less funny.

about 2 months ago
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Assange: Google Is Not What It Seems

peppepz Re:In short.... (289 comments)

make money != be the Government

about 2 months ago
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Apple Doesn't Design For Yesterday

peppepz Apple Don't Design for Yestserday, but for Fanboys (370 comments)

This has to be the biggest piece of Apple adulation that I've ever seen. A practice of flattery over everything Apple do is always superabundant in most of the output of the American tech press: we're used, for instance, to the reviewers' pirouettes when they first dismiss some bad choice by Apple as irrelevant, and then they have to praise the reversal of that choice as the best thing after sliced bread in some later version of an Apple product.

But in this case, well, Apple does something wrong (not even remotely comparable to the trainwreck that Microsoft did with Metro, I'll concede) that devalues the largest part of its already expensive product line, with the exception of the most expensive products, and without adding any value to those either, but Apple fan are happy nonetheless because... it's good to be shown how Apple does not care about who doesn't spend the most?

What is this, an exercise of asceticism in the path of the true Apple worship?

about a month ago
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ChromeOS Will No Longer Support Ext2/3/4 On External Drives/SD Cards

peppepz Re:Open Source? (345 comments)

From reading the linked discussion (before people started having shitfits), a dev suggested removing extFS support as "an unnecessary feature"

A dev announced that extFS support had been removed in beta. To people protesting, they replied that the feature was going away full stop. They even modified the ChromeOS feature page stating that ChromeOS had ext support.

because of theoretical security issues

Because of FUD. Stating that supporting the ext file system poses a security issue is FUD: it is FUD by definition, and it is FUD in particular because ext is massively used in security-critical contexts including Google's servers and Google's Android operating system. Why, ext4's key developer is a Google employee IIRC!

and because it interfered with implementing file system renaming (which looks to be surprisingly tricky to do right).

Because they didn't want to implement the few lines of code supposed to invoke the already existing facilities that set the file system label. A thing that, for tricky that it may be, was done right by the Commodore 64's 1541 floppy drive OS, by MS-DOS, by all versions of Windows, by all Linux-based desktops, by AmigaDOS, by OSX, and probably most existing operating system.

In no time at all, objections were posted, some of them rather aggressive in tone.

One of the last comments before disallowing further comments was that they were looking into keeping extFS support, but throwing an error message if you try to rename an extFS volume, and possibly implementing extFS support in userspace for security reasons.

After the slashdot story was published, after my comment was written, when more and more people started stating, most of them politely, that removing ext support would make ChromeOS unsuitable for their work, and that they were upset because there was no credible explanation for the removal of the feature, only after that developers stopped ignoring their discontent and decided to leave ext support in for the time being, but still without writing the code required to alter the filesystem label.

All of this seems quite reasonable when considering what ChromeOS is and its usual usecase.

And when did I say otherwise? I even said the same thing in another comment.

about 2 months ago
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ChromeOS Will No Longer Support Ext2/3/4 On External Drives/SD Cards

peppepz Re:Open Source? (345 comments)

Open Source != GPLv3. People can write all the code that they like but unless Google want to, their chances of actually seeing that code running on Chromebooks is zero. In this case, Google have already decided that the feature (which is already there) has to go, because simplicity.

about 2 months ago
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ChromeOS Will No Longer Support Ext2/3/4 On External Drives/SD Cards

peppepz Google's laptop, Google's rules (345 comments)

Buy a real laptop if you want to do whatever you want with it. If you buy (?) a locked-down device, which is controlled by a remote commercial entity and not by you, then don't act surprised when they don't support some use case of yours which doesn't help them make money.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Unicode 6.0.0 is out

peppepz peppepz writes  |  more than 4 years ago

peppepz (1311345) writes "Although there's no official announcement on the front page yet, the new revision of the Unicode standard, 6.0, has officially appeared on the unicode.org site.

This release includes 2,088 new characters; among them, hundreds of “Emoji”, whose inclusion in Unicode has been pushed by Apple and Google for interoperability with Japanese mobile phone operators. They're icons expressing a wide range of emotions for both human and cat faces, but also include the most unexpected glyphs such as the PILE OF POO encoded at position U+1F4A9.

On a more serious side, there's support for three new scripts, there are new properties for better automatic classification of text and spoof detection, and the newly-designed symbol for the Indian Rupee has been encoded."

Link to Original Source

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