×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Code Hero: Play and Learn

pigscanfly.ca Awesome! (101 comments)

Super cool to see this on /., I know one of the guys behind it from SF and seeing him around a few hack nights. Anything to get more people interested in codeing :)

more than 3 years ago
top

Google's 2nd Android Developer Contest kicksoff

pigscanfly.ca shiney sauce (1 comments)

Best of luck to everyone planning on submitting applications for ADC2 :) As a future Android owner (once I move to America) I look forward to seeing what sort of applications come out of this.

more than 5 years ago
top

Canadian Spectrum Auction Closes with new record

pigscanfly.ca for you yanks (2 comments)

That $42 billion CAD is worth about $41.5 billion USD. Long gone are the days of the strong American dollar :P

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 6 years ago

calum t. dalek (664381) writes "Advanced graphics programming differs from platform to platform, but weather you are coding for the Wii,Vista, or Linux the common mathematical princples remain the same. In a recent talk given by "The Professor" (Christopher Evensen) he covers the linear algebra which everyone should know. Its an excellent introduction for those interested in getting started, or a good review for those already involved."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 6 years ago

holden karau writes "Economist Larry Smith recently presented a radical new take on software startups in an increasingly globalized economy. A video recording from the conference can be found here. He talks about how to leverage the power of open source, combined with domain specific knowledge to create software of actual value to users. He spends most of his talk looking how to make successful startup using specific examples, but he ends with some cautionary tails of how things can go wrong. A must-watch for anyone serious about hoping to create successful startups using open source software."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Holden Karau writes "Economist Larry Smith discusses how to create a successful software startup company. He notes that many students have the technical knowledge to create a product but lack the skills necessary to market their product and manage a software company. Smith gives specific examples of University of Waterloo startups (with names redacted) that have been successful and others that have been unsuccessful."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden karau writes "Starting a software company is more than just having excellent code. Economist professor Larry Smith recently gave a talk on the parts of software startups which Computer Science people often forget about. The talk covers how to get market information, finding customers, etc.

I especially enjoyed the suggestions on how to find out what features your customers actually want."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

pigscanfly.ca writes "The talk itself covers the past, present, and future of computing as of 1989. While the former two can be interesting to the high-tech historian, the real star is Bill Gates' prediction of computing yet to come. Like the now-legendary '640k' line, some of Gates' remarks are almost laughably off-mark ('OS/2 is the way of the future!'); and yet, by and large, he had accurately, chillingly, prophesied an entire decade or two of soft- and hardware development.

All in all, a fascinating talk from, it seems, one of the most powerful speakers in CS and IT."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden writes "1989 Bill Gates Talk on Microsoft NewsForge has an article on a recently recovered talk Bill Gates gave back in 1989 to the University of Waterloo. Among other things, Bill talks about how in 1981, he thought that 640k would be ok for at least 10 years. Is this the source of the oft quoted Gates quote on 640k? He also covers lots of other topics, including OS/2, software piracy, the history of the software industry, and his role at Microsoft."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden writes "Graphics programming is seen as the cool thing by a large number of people. A lot of confusion arises when people attempt to do 3d graphics programming without the proper mathematical background in basic linear algebra. Christopher Evensen recently gave a talk covering covering the important fundamentals. The math is also accompanied by a real world programming example (yay 3d astroids!)."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden karau writes "Gigahertz are out and cores are in. Now more than ever, programmers must begin to develop applications that takes advantage of increasing number of cores present in computers today. However, up until now, multi-threaded development has not been easy. Researcher Stefanus Du Toit discusses and demonstrates a software system (RapidMind) he co-authored that takes the pain away from multi-threaded programming in C++. For his demo, he created a program on the PlayStation 3, consisting of thousands of chickens, each independently processed by a single processing core. The talk itself is interesting, but the demo is golden."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden writes "Graphics programming is seen as the cool thing by a large number of people. A lot of confusion arizes when people attempt to do 3d graphics programming without the proper mathematical background in basic linear algebra. Christopher Evensen recently gave a talk covering covering the important fundamentals. The math is also accompanied by a real world programming example."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden writes "Multi threaded programming is becoming increasing important to exploit new multi-cored CPUs & GPUs. The Multi- core revolution promises to provide unparalleled increases in performance, but it comes with a catch: traditional serial programming methods are not at all suited to programming these processors and methods such as multi-threading are cumbersome and rarely scale beyond a few cores. Stefanus Du Toit recently gave a talk on how to add data palarism to existing C/C++ using Rapid Mind toolkit."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden writes "NewsForge is talking about a recent talk ReactOS lead kernel developer, Alex Ionescu, gave about the internals of ReactOS. In his talk, Ionescu explains the similarities between ReactOS and Windows. and how ReactOS is close to being API compatible with Windows Server 2003. The talk looks at a lot of the technical details of how the ReactOS team implements the Windows NT kernel functionality, along with some of the problems they've faced from graphics drivers which use hard-coded values and work-arounds they are considering."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

holden writes "NewsForge has an article on a recent talk given by Alex Ionescu (a lead ReactOS developer). He talks about the recent progress made with ReactOS, but he spends the majority of his talking about the technical details of the ReactOS kernel architecture. He also talks about some of the unique problems faced by trying to build a binary compatible kernel, looking at some of the difficulties with how some vendors such as nvidia optimize there drivers and how ReactOS presently handles them, as well as how they plan to in the future. His complete talk is available online in a number of different formats."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

pigscanfly.ca (664381) writes "Back in 1989 (in the Windows 2.0 days), Bill Gates came to talk to the students of the University of Waterloo on the early days of Microsoft and the future of computing. It's an interesting blast to the past. He even touches on his 640K statement. He also covers lots of other topics, including OS/2, software piracy, the history of the software industry, and his role at Microsoft.The talk is available in a number of audio formats from the University of Waterloo Computer Science Club website."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Holden Karau writes "NewsForge has an article on a recently recovered talk Bill Gates gave back in 1989 to the University of Waterloo. Among other things, Bill talks about how in 1981, he thought that 640k would be ok for at least 10 years. Is this the source of the oft quoted Gates quote on 640k? He also covers lots of other topics, including OS/2, software piracy, the history of the software industry, and his role at Microsoft."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Holden Karau writes "Hate him or love him, Bill Gates is a influential individual in the software industry. Recent archival work at the University of Waterloo has recovered a talk given by him in 1989 in which he discusses his role as a developer in the early days of Microsoft, and his views on the future of Microsoft. He also alludes to the fact that he thought that in 1981, 640k would be good enough for everyone! Especially interesting are his views on how to "solve" software piracy in the late 80s."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

tabandmountaindew (664381) writes "Too much time is wasted re-implementing code that someone else has already done, for the sole reason its faster than finding the other code. Previous source code search engine, such as google codesearch and krugle, only considered individual files on there own, leading to poor quality results; making them only useful when the amount of time to re-implement was extremely high.According to a recent newsforge article a fledgling source-code search engine All The Code is aiming to change all of this. By looking at code, not just on its own, but also how it is used, it is able to return more relevant results. This seems like just what we need to unify the open-source community, leading to an actual common repository of unique code, and ending the cycle of unnecessary reimplementing."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

crazycoffeeninja (664381) writes "It's always been a dream of programmers: stop reinventing the wheel. Find that method, end your madness. Jax has an atrcile on a fledgling source-code search engine Allthecode thats still in the alpha stage (and presently only for Java). Unlike previous generations of code search engines, it actually considers how often code is used and the context in which it used, often leading to better results. This seems like just what we need to unify the open-source community, leading to an actual common repository of code, and ending the cycle of "hoboware": the errant macros, subroutines, and entire classes that have in the past been easier to re-write than to track down and put to work."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

hungrycheeto (664381) writes "Too much time is wasted re-implementing code that someone else has already done, for the sole reason its faster than finding the other code. Previous source code search engine, such as google codesearch and koders, only considered individual files on there own, leading to poor quality results; making them only useful when the amount of time to re-implement was extremely high.According to a recent newsforge article a fledgling source-code search engine All The Code is aiming to change all of this. The refreshingly clean interface is reminiscent of Google in its heyday — as are the mind-reading, mind-blowing search algorithms employed. By looking at code, not just on its own, but also how it is used, it is able to return more relevant results. This seems like just what we need to unify the open-source community, leading to an actual common repository of unique code, and ending the cycle of unnecessary reimplementing."
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

codemonkey69 (664381) writes "Both newsforge and jaxmagazine are covering the launch of a new source code search engine, All The Code. The big difference between this engine and previous generations is the ranking algorithm takes into consideration how code is used. The example newsforge gives is if there were two similar classes both for binary trees, if one class was used more frequently it would have a higher ranking than the less used class. While the engine only supports Java right now, the faq indicates they will be adding more languages soon. I wonder if the other source code search engines will start to use this to help them rank results?"
top

pigscanfly.ca pigscanfly.ca writes  |  more than 7 years ago

crazyirish (664381) writes "Too much time is wasted re-implementing code that someone else has already done, for the sole reason it is too difficult to find specific useful code. Previous source code search engine, such as google codesearch and koders, only considered individual files on there own, leading to poor quality results; making them only useful when the amount of time to re-implement was extremely high.According to a recent newsforge article a fledgling source-code search engine All The Code is aiming to change all of this. By looking at code, not just on its own, but also how it is used, it is able to return more relevant results. For example, if there were two similar libraries both for binary trees, if one libraries was used more frequently it would have a higher ranking than the less used library. This seems like just what we need to unify the open-source community, leading to an actual common repository enabling projects to easily discover useful modules in each other, and ending the cycle of unnecessary reimplementing allowing us to focus on new, interesting problems."

Journals

pigscanfly.ca has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?