Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Doctor Who To Teach Kids To Code

plopez Re:Sigh (161 comments)

Actually no. I think Romana, Nyssa, Sara Jane, and Susan all held their own. In fact Romana graduated first in her class on Galifrey and often "took him to school" on a number of matters.

2 days ago
top

Doctor Who To Teach Kids To Code

plopez Re:Hi, I'm the Doctor. Run for your life. (161 comments)

Or how about:
1) control TARDIS
2) move TARDIS to pick up companion
3) lure companion into TARDIS (yes I know, this is the creepy part)
4) program fabrication machine to assemble K9
5) program K9 to pilot TARDIS to adventure location
6) Send k9 on exploration trip to determine the nature of the problem

etc.

2 days ago
top

An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

plopez Let's properly define the problem (329 comments)

Problem: maximize profitability selling ice at a hippy poser wannabe festival. The constraints are:
1) Users must be at least minimally satisfied. No shouting, cursing, "line rage", or riots. The user must get a reasonable product with an acceptable wait time at an acceptable cost. The process should seem fair.
2) Costs must be minimized these include:
      a) cost of labor, this is probably the biggest cost
      b) materials cost, waste from melting ice must be minimized
      c) transportation and storage costs. No constant shuttling to and from the supplier who may be 100 KM away. Some transportation costs may actually amount to labor costs,e.g. the cost of a driver.
3) regulatory compliance cost mostly health and sanitation.
4) Losses due to theft must be minimal. This sort of implies cash on hand must be minimal. Higher sales may require banks drops for security reasons.

Let's begin...

2 days ago
top

An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

plopez Re:Obvious solutions (329 comments)

Nice one!. It would work out great for me I can wander up and down the line taking money and then just disappear into the crowd. A win-win for me-me!

2 days ago
top

An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

plopez Re:I for one (329 comments)

You must be one of those vegetarian hippies ;)

2 days ago
top

An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

plopez Re:your assuming a lot (329 comments)

And good faith in regards to the 'turbo' line. It would be a great idea for line jumping. Fan some cash out but the one is actually a 10 ten argue with the person who then caves in and lets you into the the front of the hour long line. A win-win for you-you!

2 days ago
top

An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

plopez Re:White people problems (329 comments)

To make it more realistic we can produce the ice using raw sewage. Now THAT is a problem....

2 days ago
top

Scanning Embryos For Super-Intelligent Kids Is On the Horizon

plopez What is the definition of intelligent? (366 comments)

If you do not know your requirements, how do you know what you are supposed to do? Enough said....

about a week ago
top

Scanning Embryos For Super-Intelligent Kids Is On the Horizon

plopez Re:Scarier still.... (366 comments)

It could happen.

about a week ago
top

Designing Tomorrow's Air Traffic Control Systems

plopez Re:Business Continuity Plan (72 comments)

"If the FAA was a private corporation this would never be an issue."

Q: Ummmmmm........ yeah. So Mr. AC, what have you been spending your time on?
A: Yeah, I just stare at my desk, but it looks like I'm working. I do that for probably another hour after lunch too, I'd say in a given week I probably only do about fifteen minutes of real, actual, work.

Q: this continuity plan you are working on, does it generate any revenue?
A: Not really. I mean if the company gets bought out everyone will be laid off any way so it isn't really a priority. And if the company goes under it doesn't matter much anyway either.

Q: So why are you doing it?
A: Well, management told out client we have a continuity planning committee.

Q: So who reviews these plans?
A: Well we were supposed to have review meetings but first we had to finalize the requirements for the meetings. But that led to more meetings as we realized we really did not know what was supposed to be in the plan.

Q: So the plan is now in the works?
A: No, not really. People got pulled off to help with some other revenue generating projects.

Q: What do you say you do?

about a week ago
top

Navy Tests Unpowered Exoskeleton

plopez Re:Snipers love it (79 comments)

Maintenance on armored vehicles and heavy, 6-by type, trucks also come to mind. Possibly some construction engineering work.

about a week ago
top

Navy Tests Unpowered Exoskeleton

plopez Re:Balance (79 comments)

Part of it looks like weight distribution and load balancing across the body. Weight lifter and back packers have learned long ago that managing heavy loads can be about distribution of the load and balancing (which is why I still think free weights are more effective as they rely on more muscles to control and balance the load). Then it looks like it might provide more leverage in some cases. Not a bad "low tech" approach.

about a week ago
top

How English Beat German As the Language of Science

plopez Re:Pfft. (323 comments)

Don't forget the Greeks had a name for everything ;)

about a week ago
top

How English Beat German As the Language of Science

plopez Re:German illegal? (323 comments)

If you take a clear unbiased look at US history this happens over and over. The US changed the language after breaking off from Britain changing 's' to 'z' in many spellings for example, the role of the Spanish in the western US is glossed over and contracts land deeds which by treaty the US was supposed to honor in the peace treaty with Mexico were voided, newly arrived immigrants were often banned from jobs and political office, Jews and Catholics treated as second class citizens, Japanese interred, black activists; such as the Black Panthers; assassinated, people of color are *still* trying to be barred from voting, and now it is the Muslims turn. Not too pretty.

about a week ago
top

MIT Study Finds Fault With Mars One Colony Concept

plopez Re:S[pace colonisation (269 comments)

Did you even follow the wikipedia link? google up "Haber process". If you want to support any colony of large size you will need some sort of crops which means nitrogen. There does not seem to be much in the soil or in the air, see the Haber process, so large scale Mars (or moon for that matter) are probably impracticle.

about two weeks ago
top

NASA Finds a Delaware-Sized Methane "Hot Spot" In the Southwest

plopez Re:yes, let's "zoom out" (213 comments)

but requires huge amounts of water. As does tar sands.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

top

Is Agile the new silver bullet?

plopez plopez writes  |  about a year ago

plopez (54068) writes "Agile is becoming, at least in my experience, the latest in a long line of silver bullets. Questions are arising about it applicability and articles are appearing criticizing the approach. A practice often considered best for smaller projects is being pressed into large corporate projects with far flung team members. The spawns articles such as the one recently submitted on Slashdot and even CIO.com is getting into the act: http://www.cio.com/article/734338/Why_Agile_Isn_t_Working_Bringing_Common_Sense_to_Agile_Principles

So what are the limitations of the Agile process? Is it over sold? What can be done to preserve the best parts of the approach in the face of what may be growing backlash?"
top

The Isolation of Academia and the Private Sector

plopez plopez writes  |  about 3 years ago

plopez writes "The ask Slashdot
recent posting "Ask Slashdot: Successful software from academia" asked a good question but I think also missed a larger issue.

The programming I have seen in Academia has been poor, probably worse than the private sector. OOP seems to be unheard of and is often taught by those who only heard of it a few weeks before they were required to teach the class. Ditto with Design Patterns, UML, unit testing, Agile Development, and the hard lessons from private sector death marches. The Application Developers in Academia are often poorly taught and undisciplines, more so than what I have seen in the private sector.

In addition outside of a few areas such as games, databases, and graphics; learning from Academia often doesn't make it into the mainstream. E.g. algorithm analysis should be a basic given for any working programmer, I know I did it when working as a programmer. But when I tried to explain why a bubble sort was a bad idea I was often met with blank stares. Or why using a DOM XML parser on large data sets instead of a SAX based parser was a bad idea. Or how to hack a SAX parser when needed, which involves tree searches and push-down stacks. Both push-down stacks and tree searches should be Sophomore level programming and in every programmers toolbox, even if only to assess whether a library based on these principles is a reasonable solution. Or self-referential programming, which is often skirting on the edges of AI (and in fact what some Design Patterns may be approaching). Another cool thing coming from Academia but yet seemingly unheard of is time-oriented databases (see Snodgrass who works at the University of Arizona if you are interested, there are some bizarre things that can happen if time is mishandled in databases).

The upshot is that Academia and the rest of the world seem to be isolated from each other. There is a wealth of experience in the private sector that doesn't seem to make it into Academia and vice versa. If I am wrong please correct me. And if you have ideas how to fix the problem please share them."
top

Ask slash:What is the best copyright for a thesis?

plopez plopez writes  |  more than 3 years ago

plopez writes "I am wrapping up an MS. In the past I have had problems getting copies of others' works due to lack of copyright notices on their thesis or dissertation. I don't want that happen to me. I know the joke is "No one will ever read your thesis", but in the slim chance it is useful to others I don't want them to be required to hunt me down for a release. Basically I want to say: "Copyright is released as long as this work or excerpts is properly attributed. Also, any published excerpts cannot be copyrighted by other parties, nor can the original work in its entirety.

Is this good enough? I don't want to encumber legitimate uses of the work but I also don't want some pirate coming along and stealing it out of public domain. Is public domain good enough? Or does it allow the work to be restricted by commercial interests? I know of copyleft, but copyleft is a family of copyright notices and I am unsure which one is right for my intent.

Please help. Stay on topic, don't respond to ACs who are trolling (I never do), and be polite.

TIA""

Journals

top

Why am I here?

plopez plopez writes  |  more than 4 years ago

How many years of my life have I wasted on slashdot. I could have done something more satisfying, like drinking or cultivating a heroin habit.

I seem to have not only friends but fans on this site. Why? I'm finding things getting weirder, but I guess that makes life more interesting.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?