Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

If You're Connected, Apple Collects Your Data

pmontra Redirect to a local sink (219 comments)

I'm not familiar with OSX but won't it be possible to circumvent those calls home by routing them to a local app that takes those data and throws them away?

(Waiting for Apple to tell us why they knowing those information is good for us.)

3 hours ago
top

Goodbye, World? 5 Languages That Might Not Be Long For This World

pmontra Re:If you wanted us to believe your Op-Ed... (546 comments)

I feel your pain. I don't use any language that uses spaces to define the structure of code. They made me lose too much time.

about two weeks ago
top

Eric Schmidt: Anxiety Over US Spying Will "Break the Internet"

pmontra Re:So what's the problem with that? (179 comments)

Obviously that data center would be virtual. My point was: why should we jail data in a country if any agency from around the world can still crack into it over the Internet? To make that measure effective we must prevent people from connecting to a data center in another county, service owners included. They must fly there or hire somebody living there. The service will be partitioned by country with no exchange of data whatsoever. Feasible but costly for Google, impossible for any small startup. A consequence: want to send email from the USA to somebody in Germany. Sorry, no route to host. Want to post to /. from Germany? Sorry, no route to host unless /. has a German site which you won't be able to reach from the USA. That's what I call to "break the Internet". Disclaimer: I don't like that future and I'm not advocating it.

Actually Google and the other big companies might even like it because it will destroy competition from below. They won't mind creating branch offices around the world with local data centers (and code distribution by planes) if it's the only way to keep doing business.

about two weeks ago
top

Eric Schmidt: Anxiety Over US Spying Will "Break the Internet"

pmontra Re:So what's the problem with that? (179 comments)

I'm afraid it's a problem for all of us. I quote TFA:

If a two-person startup had to build a data center in Germany just to serve customers there, it would never get off the ground, he said.

That won't prevent NSA (or anybody else) from breaching into that data center from the Internet and keep spying. The only thing that would force them to actually send operatives in Germany is to literally break the Internet. So you won't be able to get to Germany from the USA and vice versa. No connection, not even like international phone calls used to be 50 years ago.

Google could adapt, the two person startup will be limited to the country they live into. Maybe if they are in Germany they'll be able to access the whole EU.

Do I believe we will get to this? I don't, but some countries might do it. Actually, there are already countries that reduce their citizens' access the the global Internet. Spying can be an excuse to cut it off completely.

about two weeks ago
top

Why did Microsoft skip Windows 9?

pmontra Binary? (399 comments)

Maybe it's binary and they're going back to the basics. Those days have been good for them.

about two weeks ago
top

Aral Sea Basin Almost Completely Dry

pmontra Re:The water wars are coming (151 comments)

Before evaporating away most of that water is going into cotton fields in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, diverted from the Amu Darya river into a network of channels. Turkmens are also building lakes in the desert. The latest news I found about that are here.

As someone already wrote in a comment here, "too many meatbags on the planet", water can't be left alone.

about three weeks ago
top

Man Walks Past Security Screening Staring At iPad, Causing Airport Evacuation

pmontra Re:No he didn't (217 comments)

Yes, yell stop and if it fails realize no harm has been done and don't stop the whole airport. Think also to the countless hours spent around the world discussing this incident on forums and chats ;-)

about three weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

pmontra Re:Are you exposing customers? (159 comments)

You have more than a point. The second one is that your competitors will get a good list of your customers and they'll target them, which is probably not what you want. Granted, most companies have a customers list on their web site but not so detailed to include contact names and email addresses.

Maybe the bug tracker must be somewhat anonymized: expose names but not emails and don't allow signatures.

about three weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

pmontra Re:Sanitizing comments, trolls, first to market (159 comments)

Yes, having long standing bugs unfixed in public is bad PR and who points a finger at them is not necessarily a troll. They are pointing to a truth. If a company has a public bug tracker it must be prepared to explain the reasons for any won't fix. Furthermore I suggest that at least the first answer to any new bug is NOT left to developers. Developers should help in the triage phase but leave customer management personnel deal with customers. Let developers in only later on or find some developer who is good at dealing with customers. Sometimes one wrong word can alienate a whole bunch of customers. Don't risk that.

Anyway a public bug tracker is not only a liability but also a weapon against competitors. Your marketing team can start addressing customers along these lines: "OK, we've got 1,000 bugs and 100 open ones but that's all we have and you can see what's going on, our estimate of when they'll be fixed and decide if any of those bugs is a show stopper for you. Compare this with our Competitor X. How can you know how many bugs they have on their internal bug tracker? Do they have a bug tracker? Do they have any show stopper waiting for you in their code? Are they going to fix it? Can you trust their word when they don't release public information about the state of their product?"

about three weeks ago
top

Amputee Is German Long Jump Champion

pmontra Re:What about Lasik? (175 comments)

Maybe yes, maybe no but that's pretty minor. Instead how about having to decide to get your legs removed to have a chance to win a gold medal in most track and field events in the standard Olympic Games? Inevitably somebody will decide it's worth trying (so many crazy people) and that would start something pretty nasty, much worse than doping. I rather prevent it.

about 3 months ago
top

Amputee Is German Long Jump Champion

pmontra Different equipment, different categories (175 comments)

Eventually prosthetics will get so good that they'll let athletes achieve much better results than any unmodified human. When it happens everybody will see that the only way to go is different categories for different equipments. We are bound by compassion and politically correctness until we get to that point, so how to address this problem now? Call me hard hearted but I'd still apply my reasoning and enforce different categories right now even if we are in doubt of who's getting an advantage at the moment.

about 3 months ago
top

Critical Vulnerabilities In Web-Based Password Managers Found

pmontra Surprise (114 comments)

The web in insecure, don't store passwords in the web. Use keepassx instead. You get it for Windows and OS X on the site, for Linux using package managers, for Android on the Play Store and maybe also for iOS (look for MiniKeePass).

about 3 months ago
top

How the NEPTUNE Project Wired the Ocean

pmontra And so it starts (46 comments)

Ah, the Juan De Fuca plate. You deploy a network cable, you analyze the surroundings, you discover you can extract geothermal energy and by 2050 you end up with the Rifters universe. P. Watts rejoice! :-)

about 3 months ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What Would It Take For You To Buy a Smartwatch?

pmontra Nothing (427 comments)

I didn't wear anything on my wrists in the last 25 years and I can't think about any feature that would me want to do it again. One of the good features of a phone is that you put it into a pocket and take it out only when you need it. Your hands and wrists are free. When I go cycling I've already got my bike computer, on the bike. About monitoring all those quantified self things, they don't matter to me.

about 4 months ago
top

iOS 8 Strikes an Unexpected Blow Against Location Tracking

pmontra Re:Apple Actually Cares About Privacy (323 comments)

I'm the one you're replying to and I fully agree with you. A big initial markup leaves many strategies open.

about 4 months ago
top

iOS 8 Strikes an Unexpected Blow Against Location Tracking

pmontra Re:Apple Actually Cares About Privacy (323 comments)

They don't connect the dots for everybody for free. Become a strategic partner (that is: find a way to bring them more money) and they'll be happy do connect the dots for you. So don't be naive: Apple cares about its customers only when it can turn that care into profit.

BTW, this app does the same on a rooted Android device.

about 4 months ago
top

New Car Can Lean Into Curves, Literally

pmontra F1 Active Suspensions (243 comments)

All Formula 1 cars had active suspensions in the early 90's. They were computer managed to keep the car flat in the curves and maximize aerodynamically generated downforce and also to absorb impact with kerbs in chicanes with almost no rebounds (more traction). Actually they were introduced by Lotus in the early '80s but didn't get mainstream because of weight and limitations in the electronics. Williams had a better version of them in their 1991 car (electronics got much better by then) and eventually all the team followed suit until FIA banned the technology starting from 1994 because of safety concerns (Zanardi barely survived a heavy crash due to an active suspensions failure). More details on F1 active suspensions here.

Production cars used them since the 80's.

What Mercedes is doing now is reminiscent of the early Italian high speed train Pendolino. "By tilting, the train could go around curves designed for slower trains at higher speeds without causing undue discomfort to passengers." See one of those trains tilting in a curve in the UK in 2012.

about 4 months ago
top

Games That Make Players Act Like Psychopaths

pmontra Re:My favorite, and last, memory of DayZ (212 comments)

I'm surprised the designers made that decision. Didn't that destroy the game? I mean, why should I attempt to pass this entry test until I'm lucky enough to escape the death squad? I might go play 2048 instead of buying Rust. Oh wait, 2048 wasn't there yet. Angry Birds maybe?

about 5 months ago

Submissions

top

Spanish Firm Wins Tablet Case Against Apple

pmontra pmontra writes  |  more than 2 years ago

pmontra (738736) writes "A Spanish company has won a legal case against Apple and will be able to sell an Android tablet that Apple had claimed infringes on the iPad patent. It is now seeking damages from Apple for a temporary seizure of its products by Spanish customs. Furthermore they are pursuing an antitrust complaint against Apple, alleging abusive anticompetitive behavior."
Link to Original Source
top

Free Wi-Fi for the Residents of Venice, Italy

pmontra pmontra writes  |  more than 5 years ago

pmontra (738736) writes "The City of Venice, Italy, started to offer free Wi-Fi to residents (Google translation from the Italian source) on July 3 2009. Tourists and other visitors will pay 5 Euros a day for the service starting from September. The hot spots are connected to a ten thousand kilometers (6.250 miles) fiber optic LAN the City started deploying in the '90s. The first day of free Internet access has been celebrated with a digital treasure hunt in the channels of the lagoon city."

Journals

pmontra has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?