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Ask Slashdot: Best Biometric Authentication System?

postbigbang Re:RFID/card scanner (121 comments)

I'd agree with this. There comes a point where people will avoid 2Fa if it's too complex. Sometimes it just means adding nagware, timeouts, and WTFs if auth isn't congruent. And sometimes weird legal dept senses of regulatory compliance enter in, too. Indeed that might be the best place to start if audit/compliance is a side-output of the process.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Best Biometric Authentication System?

postbigbang Re:RFID/card scanner (121 comments)

Use a YubiKey and OAuth APIs. Neat and clean, and although it can be spoofed, it's not easy to do, and is as good as you get without easy to screw up "bio-authentication" infrastructure. You keep it on your badge fob, and it squirts a string as a single-key USB keyboard. Grab the string, use it with OAuth or as an identifier, and be on your way with sanity.

yesterday
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UNSW Has Collected an Estimated $100,000 In Piracy Fines Since 2008

postbigbang Re:Not the holder's money (98 comments)

Unlikely.

The university can fine you for parking violations, smoking where you're not supposed to, being in wanton possession of whatever.

Should they want to turn your name over to another entity with whom you've performed allegedly bad behaviour, they can do that. Or not, should it suit them.

about a week ago
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Is a Moral Compass a Hindrance Or a Help For Startups?

postbigbang Re:morality a hindrance or help? (197 comments)

Ends justifying the means gives rise to lots of bad stuff. I'll avoid politics as a citation. Instead, I'll choose organizations that focus on morality, their customers, their employees, as well as their investors.

In each case, if you pick amoral customers, employees, or investors, any one of the three will bring you down, because each has a greed stake, rather than a value stake, in the outcome of the working machine that is the organization.

Those managing the organization can pick moral or amoral, each with decidedly different outcomes. Tossing aside morality for short periods will upset the equations of long term success. If you're going for short term success, then it's your soul that counts. If you have one.

about a week ago
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Microsoft Azure Outage Across the Globe

postbigbang Re: Out of band patch.. (167 comments)

We'll hear, next week, about a zero-day that takes down Azure. Oh, wait.....

about a week ago
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For Some Would-Be Google Glass Buyers and Devs, Delays May Mean Giving Up

postbigbang Re:Early adopters (154 comments)

The fulcrum of backlash against the device in an almost uniform, vehement, and studied way exposing Google's complete disdain for respect of privacy might have something to do with it as well. Pulling back the Oz Curtain and exposing that Google's business model is the complete ownership of your personal information for their profit might be just too much advance with just one product.

about two weeks ago
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Amazon Goes After Oracle (Again) With New Aurora Database

postbigbang Re:What's the Difference? (102 comments)

So are 1957 Porsches. Some designs are timeless, but entropy will get them all but a few samples preserved for posterity.

about two weeks ago
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Amazon Goes After Oracle (Again) With New Aurora Database

postbigbang Re:What's the Difference? (102 comments)

There's also a HUGE ecosystem, very profitable, that after two dozen years, actually works-- expensive as it is. Oracle DBAs and SQL coders aren't the sort of person that's after the latest "edgy" new db scheme.

I would venture that most of them don't like JSON, have no clue for hadoop, and are the online/never-fail sorts. They're not going to use REST against an AJAX app, are clueless about puppet, and believe in middleware. Not gonna get them to fix what they perceive as not-broken.

There is a small amount of wisdom in this philosophy, but like COBOL, mainframes/minis, and AS/400s/AIX, time will eventually pass them by, slowly, but unerringly, IMHO.

about two weeks ago
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Gridlock In Action: Retailers Demand New Regulations To Protect Consumers

postbigbang Re:CYA (127 comments)

And if either the banks, the retailers, and/or any member of the supply chain gave up a single point in transactions TO UPGRADE THEIR SECURITY INFRASTRUCTURE and SELF POLICE, then government interaction would be unnecessary and consumer safety would soar.

It's always someone else's problem, and someone else needs to eat the costs. So crappy POS, putting your fingers in your ears when IT warns you that your systems are about to explode, be breached, or become a PR nightmare, are all OK because it's the other guy's problem, never your own.

Fuck that.

about two weeks ago
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Tor Project Mulls How Feds Took Down Hidden Websites

postbigbang Re:IPv6 as a help? (135 comments)

IPv6 rarely uses NAT, so it's almost like using a serial number on your machine's address. So, no, no help.

about two weeks ago
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Real Net Neutrality Problem: 'Edge Provider' vs 'End User'

postbigbang Re:Which way are the bits going? (97 comments)

Most of it, to the last mile or so, is in the ground in the US.... there's tons of dark fiber waiting to be lit up.

Fuck corporations turning a profit. This is a utility, not a bunch of regional monopolies masquerading as public beneficiaries. Governments and PEOPLE get easement and right-of-way income. There are lots of models as to how this can be done.

Pioneers like Loma Linda, CA, DIgital Cities, and others show how to make it work financially, and no, not some sort of neo-socialist/commie model.

Should there be those profiting? Sure. No argument. The current model of monopoly by legislative bribery just has to end, however.

about three weeks ago
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Real Net Neutrality Problem: 'Edge Provider' vs 'End User'

postbigbang Re:Which way are the bits going? (97 comments)

It ought to be, nodes are nodes, but we're talking about the difference between telco legacy interconnect and the dawn of Internet "hotels" which were aggregations near NAP points and convenient telco interconnects. This is what was the problem: ATM, SONET, and other L1/L2 problems. This allowed the concept that some junction points were more important than others, and that an edge device could be poorly provisioned, while big junction points could have nearby CDNs, huge hosts, and so forth.

Add in isometric/QOS protocols, and the lines start to blur further, as we allow multimedia to get priority over non isochronous protocols. We've created protocol priority in the name of not screwing up audio and video feeds. Today, AV feeds permeate and mostly dominate the wires statistically by content type.

Where is the line drawn between QoS protocols, time-sensitive multimedia delivery, brute force bandwidth, and everyone owning the equiv of a Cisco core router?

It's called fiber. FTTH, FTTbedroom, and we need to promulgate fiber transports-- symmetrical ones-- as home edge standards, just like a NEMA 120vac/60hz outlet (or the 220v/ 50-60hz int'l equiv). This at least lifts all boats.

about three weeks ago
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Tim Cook: "I'm Proud To Be Gay"

postbigbang Re:Gay? (764 comments)

Anyone can give consent; responsibility says that you make an uncivil posit by asking animals/children to consent to have sex with you. Bigotry? Ask a professional.

about a month ago
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Tim Cook: "I'm Proud To Be Gay"

postbigbang Re:Gay? (764 comments)

None of these are arbitrary. Anyone can be seduced. As a higher species, we bear civil responsibility. Screwing animals isn't responsible.

Screwing children is the same answer. They have insufficient nexus and context to say "yes". They're children.

Consent isn't legal fiction, it's civility. All else is rape.

about a month ago
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Tim Cook: "I'm Proud To Be Gay"

postbigbang Re:Gay? (764 comments)

You're conflating pre-disposed behavior with an action, and you forgot: consent. Animals can't give consent. Children can't give consent (and shouldn't need to be asked). Siblings are usually underage during incestuous phases and they can't give consent because they're children.

Being attracted (or not) to any gender can work, but the Judeo/Christian/Islamic ways (subject to some notable exception) argues against non-heterosexual relationships, except asexuality-- which oddly is lauded. Homosexuality doesn't produce offsprings, except in rare cases not worth mentioning (not talking about bisexuality).

Consensual sex is key. We go successfully from "consensual".

about a month ago
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Labor Department To Destroy H-1B Records

postbigbang Re:H1B applicants are people too (190 comments)

Redacting sounds good on the surface, but piecing the info back together again is somewhat trivial. Sharpies don't do a great job when you can blow something up to ridiculous multiples, then use pattern recognition to infer the data hidden behind the redaction.

It's better to have Norton AV recognize this as a virus. That'll get rid of it. Yeah. Or give it to an IRS exec in the form of an email.....

about a month ago
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Steve Ballmer Gets Billion-Dollar Tax Write-Off For Being Basketball Baron

postbigbang Re:So the taxpayer pays for overage, got it (255 comments)

There is something negative in exchange for the average tax payer, called: we prop up the difference because the bills still need to get paid. Teachers, public safety, roads, etc etc.

This is yet another example of how that thick, bought-and-paid-for tax code benefits those who bought and paid for it. That means most of us that thought that government fairness wasn't an oxymoron get another kick in the slats.

Remember to vote. And if in Chicagoland, often and frequently.

about 1 month ago
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

postbigbang Re:Not sure about this one (168 comments)

Think about it. They already know who you are unless you anonymously purchased a "drop" phone. With either GPS or LBS, they know where the phone's been. It was with you, likely. You fell asleep where you live, so that's your address, resolved to about 1m most places. There's a MAC address on the phone, very difficult to spoof. There are two more IDs on the phone, one as your EIMI or equiv, and other that's buried in a firmware-reachable mem location.

You drove by the sniffing cell towers on your way into the airport. If WiFi was on, it sniffed that, too. Up against a database linking users to cell, another easily done link says: whoa there, Chuck, you're on the no-way-Jose list. We're going to ask you to step into our office after we get the nekkid picture of you.

Yeah, I'm giving them too much credit, partly in humor. Such a scenario isn't outside of the realm of real possibility. Why use so much technology when you can mark ropes? Next they'll be weighing passengers with rugs made out of load cells so they can balance plane weights before you ever get to the bankrupt pizza maker on the next concourse.

about a month ago
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

postbigbang Re:Not sure about this one (168 comments)

Um, the line goes to here, so about X. If the line goes to there, ummm, y.

They just wanna check your MAC address to ensure you're not on the NoFly list so that they can handle your incarceration discretely.

about a month ago

Submissions

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Does anyone make an photo de-duplicator for Linux? Something that reads EXIF?

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  about 10 months ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Imagine having thousands of images on disparate machines. many are dupes, even among the disparate machines. It's impossible to delete all the dupes manually and create a singular, accurate photo image base? Is there an app out there that can scan a file system, perhaps a target sub-folder system, and suck in the images-- WITHOUT creating duplicates? Perhaps by reading EXIF info or hashes? I have eleven file systems saved, and the task of eliminating dupes seems impossible."
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WSJ rumors that VMware will buy Novell

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 4 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Steven J Vaughn-Nichols speculates on the WSJ piece that speculates VMware may be buying Novell's Linux assets (along with other core Novell assets). Will Big Red be Big Dead? Will SUSE be used as a fighting tool against Windows platforms? Will ex-Microsoft throne pretender Paul Maritz use Novell's Directory Services to sling against Microsoft? Discuss."
Link to Original Source
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Acer Founder: Apple's iPad and iPhone are Viruses

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 4 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Stan Shih, founder of Acer, is apparently unhappy with Apple's iPad and iPhone success, and calls these products a virus. Acer, it should be noted, is the #2 maker of PCs in the world. Stan believes that Apple can be "isolated" so that companies will become "immune". Is this the ultimate sour grapes?"
Link to Original Source
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Jury finds Novell owns Unix Copyrights; SCO Loses!

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 4 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Novell won its jury decision as defendant in the SCO Slander of Title charge against its ownership of Unix copyrights, and ostensibly, intellectual property. It was a fairly short trial, and it leaves SCO nearing Chapter 7 despite an influx of funds. They have few assets, and if they appeal, it'll be against the results of a laborious discovery process, severe rulings by the trial judge largely against Novell, and will cost them still another fortune they don't have. Cheers and champagne corks for FOSS and especially Linux users-- and the famous and tenacious Pamela Jones, who documented it all."
Link to Original Source
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US House Bill prohibits government file sharing

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  about 5 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "HR4098 attempts to prohibit file sharing software on government and contractor computers or 'telework' home computers used by these employees. Another RIAA/MPAA muscle play on government machines? Is the HR afraid of illegally shared copies of Celine Dion MP3s on government systems?"
Link to Original Source
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postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 8 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Ray Noorda, controversial head of numerous investments in the computer industry died at age 82, according to http://www.sltrib.com/ci_4465776 .
Noorda once pressured National Semiconductor to lower the price of Ethernet cards, then took on Bill Gates, buying the keys to Unix and then giving them away, then many software packages to fight Microsoft's Word and Office with WordPerfect, Quattro Pro, and others. When the world went to the IP protocols, Novell's IPX protocol set was arguably more prevalent than IP at the time. And then the Internet train departed, and Novell's strategies weren't ready — and Gates had (if now viewed frighteningly) a plan.

Noorda's investments in many companies, and his training academy for future execs in IT, also showed the supportive Mormon side of Noorda and the companies he spawned. Arguably, he's the father of the LAN more than any other business exec in the industry today. Many captains of industry, including Google's Eric Schmidt, owes their boot camp to Noorda."

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