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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

You admit, ipso facto, Google knows, and the advertiser knows. That they don't serve it on a silver platter is just a detail.

Don't give your permission, how? Decide what conglomeration has access and which doesn't? Geemenie, we can't get people to stop using 123456 as a freaking password. These devices, IMHO, are predatory! Yeah, we'll disable them.

Then the voice recognition and auto-recognition software in the AV system in the living room party will rat out all of the participants. We have to change this opt-out mentality, as if everyone has tacit permission to begin with. Who, when, ever does anyone ever get anything like "serious consequences for failing to comply with such requests" when law enforcement barely knows their shoes from shinola? It's grab first, and don't audit later.

You trust these people, and they are stealing you blind, and will continue to do so until it becomes very difficult for them to continue. Google didn't get rich by hiding people's data. Didn't happen that way. If you work for them, you're part of the problem, IMHO.

Yeah, tie things up in the legislature. How many other blocks do you wanna throw up before it becomes a moral issue for you?

4 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

postbigbang Re:The "what?!" is reaction time (304 comments)

Insurance companies, nationwide. In terms of accident-free miles, only truck drivers are better.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

postbigbang Re:The "what?!" is reaction time (304 comments)

Statistically, cops have far fewer accidents that they caused. Should they be cited? Sure. Will they? Never, as the fraternity of enforcers exempts themselves, and given human behavior, you're not going to easily change that, even with cop-cams. I understand your fears, I doubt that you'll be able to change the behavior of public safety officers. Good luck.

5 days ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

It's disingenuous to assert that Google doesn't know about the data that is collects, sells it (the http_referrer coin collection), and that the advertiser whose link you clicked doesn't know you, perhaps by name (referring to the fact that the IPv4 address space has largely known destinations to the street address and user-characteristics).

Upsetting is that claims of unidentifiable use are in fact, one of the most hilarious lies in computing, as all of this information in a click-thru is so handily re-assembled. There is no privacy here, in the very tiniest. Google's business model is to know--==> you. They don't have this right.

Slashdot knows who I am. My IP is known. They can be linked. One can become somewhat anonymous on the Internet, but only by trying really, really hard to accomplish this, and it's transient at best-- as accumulated information becomes your dossier.

The implications of dossiers are for a different forum, but in this circumstance, this thread, this post, it's my criticism of the pretension within the post, viz: "And with your permission and all of that, you are interacting with the things going on in the room" means that your devices will be forced to respond to its ambient environment, and what you do, even say, maybe your sexual responses, all of these will become exposed, modesty and your intentions to hide these things, vanquished by environmental probes.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

postbigbang Re:The "what?!" is reaction time (304 comments)

Erratic isn't a useful measure. Voluntarily removing your focus from driving, e.g. taking a call, removing your eyes from the road for more than a second every 20sec, there'll be something that could be a viable measure that puts people's eyes back on the road, and not the latest tweet or instagram pic.

5 days ago
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At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

postbigbang Re:Bullshit (211 comments)

I can stop your heart with 2microvolts if it's attached to a 9mm slug.

To keep the oscillator going, a nanoamp is one measure, but voltage pushes that current through the coil to make it move. Voltage, difference in potential, is unlikely to come from ambient sources, so the there's still a little bit of a kick left in the battery, not the surrounding area.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

postbigbang Re:The "what?!" is reaction time (304 comments)

I drive about 150mi per week on highways, not freeways, and watch as dozens and dozens of people text. They're easy to spot.

Were we to apply the emphasis towards keeping your eyes on the road, rather than improving brakes-- which were probably ok as they DON'T DO FORENSICS on such accidents, better money would be spent.

How do you get people to stop fooling with their devices? Enable motion detection, which keeps the cam on in the phone. Might not work for many, but I'd like to see texting and driving fined in the same way as DUIs. Same problem: irresponsibility.

5 days ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

Which exonerates Google..... no.

Google of course, has NO idea that you clicked. Nope, never, nada. /sarcasm.

5 days ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

Google sells the ad.

You click the ad.

Google gets the click, and gets paid.

Advertiser gets the http_referrer, but in doing so, also gets the user IP address. Every IP address in IPv4 space is a known destination.

What was your question, again?

5 days ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

And each click gets them an IP address, and a history and an object. Who do you think you're kidding? Click-thrus are insanely read by each of the advertisers, and in turn, as no agreement exists at this phase, does WHAT THEY WANT with the data.

Advertisers see 100% of the clicks. 100%. Not nothing, 100%. Why? C'mon. You think we're stupid??

about a week ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

There are well-known methods of avoiding browser fingerprinting, and supercookies are easily eliminated.

Hints: use multiple browsers; rename innocuous cookies to the filename of well-known supercookies, then use whatever is appropriate for your operating system to make the cookie R/O. Some of us don't use gmail (or google) at all, and many more use a separate browser for social media, sometimes several of them. It's also fun to go to the library and copy salient cookie files from their browsers (easily done) and then copy them into your favorite browser's storage to salt things up. YMMV.

about a week ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

Which is why it's a great idea to kill your cookies frequently. A few years from now, I'll find a thrift store with wearables, don some random ones, and freakout some database analysts.

Wow-- Ernie-- look at this! J Lo, Rod Canion, and Merle Haggard Jr are passing thru this train station! Look!

about a week ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

I vaguely remember that during the nomination of Judge Bork to the SCOTUS, his video rental habits revelation spawned a law that forbids such things, but the details are eluding me.

But that's the US, and not the rest of the world, and is likely to be done eventually. The data is voluminous, the motives evil.

about a week ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

postbigbang Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

Happens right now. Google gets your permission to vacuum the contents of Gmail, liberate data from your Android phone, and then somehow, removing "personal identifiable information", liberates this data and sells it to others, who reassemble the information.

Permission, I believe within this context, is another of Schmidt's reality distortions. The Internet of Crap will indeed require interactions, and they'll be two states for you to interact: by the facade of your permission, and by devices querying your to obtain metadata to interact with you and then send the results to some hadoop cluster in SeaLandia for, um, additional processing.

about a week ago
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Google Pondering $1 Billion Investment In SpaceX's Satellite Internet

postbigbang Re:Business model? (104 comments)

When you look at atmospheric maps, the amount of space debris is truly horrendous. No space garbagemen are going up there, tidying things up, then coming back to earth with a load of space trash-- unless we have details the military aren't confessing to.

If you're trying to put satellites into LEOs, you must also contend with all of the other junk already there, most working but some not. Yes, they decay. Could take weeks, could take centuries. I say: pay the freaking money and just wire fibre, multimode, pay the damn bill, and get over it. Fiber done well has the ability to go far beyond gigabit to the bedroom. Use low power/low radius tranceivers, like we do with cellular and WiFi technologies (among others) to give that all important Facebook search at the beach.

about two weeks ago
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Google Pondering $1 Billion Investment In SpaceX's Satellite Internet

postbigbang Re:Business model? (104 comments)

I'm not worried so much about ulterior motives. I'm worried about all that space junk when the upgrade.

Hello tech support? Can you, um, upgrade our 2400 satellites to gigabit, please? Sure, I'll hold.

about two weeks ago
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Google Search Will Be Your Next Brain

postbigbang Re:What do you mean? (45 comments)

Nice work, but serious hubris and marketing going on here. Google can't seem to find a product these days, and this is just another attempt to get in on the non-robotic servant market. I wish they'd read the scifi books inspiring their products to the freaking end of the book.

about two weeks ago
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IEEE: New H-1B Bill Will "Help Destroy" US Tech Workforce

postbigbang Re:ah so both parties f-d us (484 comments)

Indentured servants, just like those within the nooses of student loans.

about two weeks ago
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United and Orbitz Sue 22-Year-Old Programmer For Compiling Public Info

postbigbang Re:Cheaper (349 comments)

As an industry, a gaggle of monopolies, and true, oligopoly. Said differently: a couple of them have at least the facade of trying to be reasonable, and while admittedly planes stay in the air and land safely these days, that should have been a pre-requisite.

More than two million flight miles later, I won't fly on half the carriers in the USA, and British Airways is added to the list for multiple sins of mismanagement.

about a month ago

Submissions

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Does anyone make an photo de-duplicator for Linux? Something that reads EXIF?

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  1 year,6 days

postbigbang (761081) writes "Imagine having thousands of images on disparate machines. many are dupes, even among the disparate machines. It's impossible to delete all the dupes manually and create a singular, accurate photo image base? Is there an app out there that can scan a file system, perhaps a target sub-folder system, and suck in the images-- WITHOUT creating duplicates? Perhaps by reading EXIF info or hashes? I have eleven file systems saved, and the task of eliminating dupes seems impossible."
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WSJ rumors that VMware will buy Novell

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 4 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Steven J Vaughn-Nichols speculates on the WSJ piece that speculates VMware may be buying Novell's Linux assets (along with other core Novell assets). Will Big Red be Big Dead? Will SUSE be used as a fighting tool against Windows platforms? Will ex-Microsoft throne pretender Paul Maritz use Novell's Directory Services to sling against Microsoft? Discuss."
Link to Original Source
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Acer Founder: Apple's iPad and iPhone are Viruses

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 4 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Stan Shih, founder of Acer, is apparently unhappy with Apple's iPad and iPhone success, and calls these products a virus. Acer, it should be noted, is the #2 maker of PCs in the world. Stan believes that Apple can be "isolated" so that companies will become "immune". Is this the ultimate sour grapes?"
Link to Original Source
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Jury finds Novell owns Unix Copyrights; SCO Loses!

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 3 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Novell won its jury decision as defendant in the SCO Slander of Title charge against its ownership of Unix copyrights, and ostensibly, intellectual property. It was a fairly short trial, and it leaves SCO nearing Chapter 7 despite an influx of funds. They have few assets, and if they appeal, it'll be against the results of a laborious discovery process, severe rulings by the trial judge largely against Novell, and will cost them still another fortune they don't have. Cheers and champagne corks for FOSS and especially Linux users-- and the famous and tenacious Pamela Jones, who documented it all."
Link to Original Source
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US House Bill prohibits government file sharing

postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 5 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "HR4098 attempts to prohibit file sharing software on government and contractor computers or 'telework' home computers used by these employees. Another RIAA/MPAA muscle play on government machines? Is the HR afraid of illegally shared copies of Celine Dion MP3s on government systems?"
Link to Original Source
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postbigbang postbigbang writes  |  more than 8 years ago

postbigbang (761081) writes "Ray Noorda, controversial head of numerous investments in the computer industry died at age 82, according to http://www.sltrib.com/ci_4465776 .
Noorda once pressured National Semiconductor to lower the price of Ethernet cards, then took on Bill Gates, buying the keys to Unix and then giving them away, then many software packages to fight Microsoft's Word and Office with WordPerfect, Quattro Pro, and others. When the world went to the IP protocols, Novell's IPX protocol set was arguably more prevalent than IP at the time. And then the Internet train departed, and Novell's strategies weren't ready — and Gates had (if now viewed frighteningly) a plan.

Noorda's investments in many companies, and his training academy for future execs in IT, also showed the supportive Mormon side of Noorda and the companies he spawned. Arguably, he's the father of the LAN more than any other business exec in the industry today. Many captains of industry, including Google's Eric Schmidt, owes their boot camp to Noorda."

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