Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

HP's Strange Obsession With WebOS For Printers

pseudonomous Re:Hah. (226 comments)

I would like to disagree with the moderation of your comment, it is *not* funny. It is $&#*ing tragic. There was a problem "every printer needs it's own #!*& driver", there were at least two solutions, postscript and PCL that date back to at least the 1980s. But, unless you've got something fancy enough to be considered a network printer, odds are that "the printer still needs it's own #!*& driver". Postscript printers were not-so-common in the 1980's because it was computationally expensive and microprocessors and RAM were not cheap back in the 1980's, but they *are* cheap now. So, let's recap:

  1. 1) We had a problem
  2. 2) We found a technical solution 30 years ago
  3. 3) We still have the same problem, I have no idea why.

more than 2 years ago
top

Fedora Aims To Simplify Linux Filesystem

pseudonomous Re:So windows is right (803 comments)

Those gconf xml files remind me an awful lot of the windows registry...

more than 2 years ago
top

BT Promises 300Mbps FTTP By 2012

pseudonomous 300 Mpbs FTP (121 comments)

I'd love to be able to transfer files that fast; I can't be the only one who misread the title.

more than 2 years ago
top

Microsoft Killed the Start Menu Because No One Uses It

pseudonomous So .. 89% of users are using the start menu? (862 comments)

So Microsoft claims 11% less users use the start menu in Windows 7 vs. Vista. I'll believe that; I assume everybody using Vista uses the start menu, so they're only deprecating a feature used by 89% of all users.

more than 2 years ago
top

Only Idiots Don't Give Back To Free Software

pseudonomous Re:Contributions don`t have to be tit for tat ... (326 comments)

The problem with, say Ubuntu, packaging a lot of open source software without contributing upstream is that Ubuntu doesn't just package the software unmodified, they make changes to add desired features, fix bugs, and get different pieces of software to integrate better. But, since they don't contribute many of their changes upstream, the upstream developers will change the software without any regard for whether the downstream Ubuntu patches, so if the Ubuntu people want to pull in a new version of the upstream code, they also have to update their patches. As Ubuntu introduces more and more patches, they do more and more work maintaining their local branch of the software, until it gets to the point where they are expending as much effort as if they'd just wrote things themselves. For Ubuntu, this is most pronounced with GNOME, Canonical was not involved enough in GNOME development, so the GNOME guys went off and did their own thing while Canonical developed Unity. Now you have two frontends to GNOME, but the Ubuntu guys can't get certain upstream changes made, because upstream doesn't care about Unity, only GNOME shell, which means more work for Ubuntu developers. It's true that if you don't need to patch anything, then there's really no incentive to contribute, but when you *are* going to make modifications then you're in the situation Zemlin's talking about; it's almost always in your self-interest to get the changes merged in upstream. It's a little bit of extra work in the short-term that saves you effort in the long run.

about 3 years ago
top

Mozilla's Vision of an 'Internet Life' Platform

pseudonomous Re:Fuck sakes.. (105 comments)

13.0.782.107 (Developer Build 0 Linux) doesn't do that, although this is "chromium" not the branded "chrome".

more than 3 years ago
top

Mozilla's Vision of an 'Internet Life' Platform

pseudonomous Re:Fuck sakes... (105 comments)

Despite massive code-churn, chrome's UI has been pretty much static, at least for as long as it's had a Linux port. I think they're on to something. Once people get used to using the browser (or any program, for that matter), they don't want to relearn the interface after every update, they just want the damn thing to work.

more than 3 years ago
top

Is Free Software Ready For E-publishing?

pseudonomous Re:Boycotting? Hardly (221 comments)

That's linked in TFA, so apparently it didn't work in this case.

more than 3 years ago
top

Linus Torvalds Ditches GNOME 3 For Xfce

pseudonomous Re:Change for the sake of change? (835 comments)

I sincerely doubt XFCE will ever get a major UI overhaul like Gnome and KDE periodically do, for one, I don't think they have enough developers that they'd even want to try.

more than 3 years ago
top

Apple Removes MySQL From Lion Server

pseudonomous Re:Buy Apple Server Get Open Source Software (303 comments)

In my experience, that rate of hardware failure on Apple hardware is pretty close to the rate of failure on non-Apple PC hardware.

more than 3 years ago
top

Apple Removes MySQL From Lion Server

pseudonomous Re:Buy Apple Server Get Open Source Software (303 comments)

I imagine you could probably get someone to give you a pentium-based computer for free, and it may indeed perform sufficiently well to accomplish some basic, low-load server type tasks, but I think most people would prefer to put processors that were designed sometime in the last decade in their servers instead. The mac mini is a great little machine, and it's not even over-priced if you *want* something that small, but it's kind of limited in it's I/O capabilities. You can put two hardrives in the latest revision, as long as you're OK with losing the optical drive, and then you can spend the better part of a day trying to take one out and replace it if it fails. I suppose other people may have different opinions, but if I ran a server for my business, I'd want the hardware maintenance to be dead simple. In fact, I'd want hot-swappable drives, so I don't even have to take the machine down to do the drive replacement. And I'd want at least the *option* to install at least 4 sata/esate drives. The "mini-server" runs $999 currently, for that price, I'm sure you could build or buy yourself a much bigger, but also much more convenient to work on tower, with as powerful a processor, and significantly expanded I/O options, which also probably consumes a bit more power as well as performs slightly better. Then install CentOS and you're good to go.

more than 3 years ago
top

Are Bad Economic Times Good for Free Software?

pseudonomous Re:Simple answer ... (357 comments)

(B) is un-true for an OEM license of any operating system AFAIK

more than 3 years ago
top

DIY Dropbox Alternatives

pseudonomous Re:Unison (188 comments)

Indeed, if you choose not to use dropbox, unison is almost certainly the proper choice for the job.

more than 3 years ago
top

Lennart Poettering: BSD Isn't Relevant Anymore

pseudonomous Re:Um... Pardon Me, But... (460 comments)

Aren't both iptables/ipchains Linux only? Doesn't NetBSD use pf like OpenBSD?

more than 3 years ago
top

Next-Gen Low-Latency Open Codec Beats HE-AAC

pseudonomous Re:That's all fine and dandy, but.... (166 comments)

But, to reply more to the parent than to you: it's not like you're just going to be using this over wireless internet; some people actually have DSL or better connections with less then 40ms of latency; at rates like that a codec latency of 4ms is still 20% of the total latency. At that kind of latency 45ms you could play music with someone without driving yourself crazy because you both sound like your lagging behind the beat (you WILL both appear to be lagging to each other, but 45ms is a small enough amount of latency that it won't completely destroy the performance). In fact, even 100ms of total latency is probably survivable in a mid-tempo song (but will be very noticable), anything you can do at the codec level to chop that down improves the experience.

more than 3 years ago
top

Asia Runs Out of IPv4 Addresses

pseudonomous Re:Dual Stacks..... forever... (321 comments)

Wasn't the whole point of IPv6 being essentially independent of IPv4 so that you COULD run dual stacks? Because it would be completely un-reasonable to be able to cut-over from one addressing protocol to another world wide in any reasonable fashion? So ... yes, dual stacks for the next 20 years on main-stream devices, maybe 70-80 years for niche needs sounds reasonable to me.

more than 3 years ago
top

The Case Against GUIs, Revisited

pseudonomous Re:CLI is no longer essential (720 comments)

The thing is you can't necessarily fix a bad gui, unless you're working with something where you have access to the source and can replace the code; with cli, you can alway's script your way around a problem. Your programs doesn't validate input? Write an input validater and pipe it through that. Obviously, cli is great for batch operations and automation, as well. Even if it's a black box, proprietary system. Even if you can change the code, which is easier to do? Spend 15 minutes or less working in your favorite scripting language or source the application source, patch it, re-compile if necessary, test, then apply the operation? (Especially if this is a one-off operation).

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

top

Linux Foundation says it's time to ditch FAT

pseudonomous pseudonomous writes  |  more than 5 years ago

pseudonomous (1389971) writes "In a blog entry today, Jim Zemlin, executive director of the linux foundation discusses the recent settlement between tom tom and microsoft, Zemlin says "Microsoft does not appear to be a leopard capable of changing its spots", in regards to open standards and technology and suggests that developers replace FAT dependant technology with reliance on another system. Which of course, begs the question, "what other file system is possibly going to be as portable as fat32?", and "will it support files larger than 4 GB?"."
Link to Original Source
top

ATI to drop support for r300-r500 card in catalyst

pseudonomous pseudonomous writes  |  more than 5 years ago

pseudonomous (1389971) writes "Michael Larabel of phoronix.com reports the ATI/AMD plans to drop support for graphics cards based on the the r300-r500 chipsets (pre-HD 2xxx series) in the upcoming Catalyst 9.4 release, instead a forked legacy driver will be avialable, unfortunately, there's no garuantee from AMD when or if the legacy driver will support the new Xorg 1.6 release. Indead, as arch linux developers know well, there's no telling when Catalyst will support the new Xserver release on *any* hardware. Luckily, there exist open source ati drivers (the RadeonHD driver does not support any cards of this Vintage, but is an alternative driver for new hardware), which are mostly functional, but unfortunately lack some features like aggressive power management and are affected by a number of bugs which may not be fixed for some time. If you're interested in the story about arch linux pushing off catalyst support to the community, I recommend reading the more balanced forum post by one of the arch developers linked to above (it's the second post), as opposed to the more sensationalistic Phoronix article, I just linked to here."
Link to Original Source

Journals

pseudonomous has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>