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Amazon Taking Down Erotica, Removing From Kindles

psychodelicacy Re:1984 (641 comments)

"Redaction" is taking source material and bringing it together into a particular (usually written) form. It can imply editing or revision of the text for publication, including abridgement. I think this latter meaning is where the confusion arises: redacting a text can mean cutting it down through summary or deletion, but this meaning is secondary to the main idea of making something readable or publishable. Originally, in fact, "redact" didn't apply specifically to texts - one could redact (i.e. combine) cities by bringing them together under a single ruler, or redact (i.e.reduce) a person to poverty.

more than 3 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:lokisday (510 comments)

Did you photoshop that? Please tell me you didn't! That is better than sharks with lasers.

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

Jewish sabbath is not dissimilar, except of course the ban on electricity. So no TV. If you're a big reader like me, though, it's a phenomenally excellent day - no-one can bug you with phonecalls or email. You're forced not to "just catch up on that thing from work" (which turns into an extra seven-hour workday) or "just go to the store for a few things" (which turns into carrying sixty bags of heavy stuff back home). It's like you're given the gift of shutting off and chilling out for a day. It's not for everyone, but I think even if I gave up God I might well keep hold of the Sabbath.

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

But... I set Firefox to block cookies. :( Can I still get a hug, pwease?

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

January is the coldest month in Bethlehem, with temperatures reaching between 33 and 55 F. So December, if that's when the liddle guy really was born, probably wasn't too bad if you wrapped up warm. (Source.)

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

Hey, Christian - how's about showing some of those Christian virtues and stop trying to trick people with your sig., huh? ;)

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

Really? How about ritual sacrifice? Or legal execution? Or war? Revenge killings were pretty normal in early Germanic cultures, including England.

Or if you want to think about stealing, how about eminent domain? The appropriation of Jewish property by the Nazis? The confiscation of treasure trove by the British crown?

Lying: meet the legal profession.

There are many things we think are not okay which are, in fact, endorsed by our societies - at least, as long as it's the wealthy and powerful doing them.

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

I think he means "adopted from Old Norse back when the Germanic tribes pwned you" - but his version is kinda snappier.

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

Oh, I see, yet another example of women being excluded, huh?

about 4 years ago
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The best day of the week, generally:

psychodelicacy Re:Sunday, of course (510 comments)

When did you last hear of this happening? Of a Jew or a Christian killing his child because "God commanded it"? I'm sure it happens, infinitesimally rarely, but anyone who did that would be locked up. You don't like the idea that people with faith may consider their duty to their deity as more important than their duty to the (human) laws of the land, but such people have managed to stand up against horrendous regimes and unjust laws. You don't like the idea that duty to God might outweigh basic humanity - but the religious have no monopoly on a lack of humanity, any more than they have a monopoly on being nice. People are people, and a Christian murderer would probably also be a murderer if he were an atheist, just as a lovely atheist would probably still be lovely if he were Jewish. Religion is a way for people to express what is already there, in my experience; it doesn't override innate character, merely reflects it.

about 4 years ago
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As smart-phones go, my phone is ...

psychodelicacy Re:Tips... (519 comments)

Read Barbara Ehrenreich's "Nickel and Dimed" to get some idea of why the remedies you helpfully suggest are impractical and unrealistic. The position of workers in the food industry stinks, and their chances of negotiating decent conditions range from zero to bupkiss as things are.

about 4 years ago
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Stanford's Authoritative Alternative To Wikipedia

psychodelicacy Re:tags are correct (355 comments)

Translation: "I don't understand a lot of what these people say, but I am reluctant to believe that there could be anything missing in my own education or intelligence, therefore I will ridicule the authors instead."

about 4 years ago
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RIAA President Says Copyright Law "Isn't Working"

psychodelicacy Re:What a coincidence (473 comments)

Many of the works we consider "great", and part of our cultural heritage, were produced before copyright, and many were also produced without the prospect of payment in the artist's lifetime. Even those who made a living through their work generally earned no more than a modest salary. The "impoverished artist" is a cliche, but it was the norm for a very long time. And yet, these painters, authors, and musicians produced their work because they had talent and drive, and a love of their chosen medium. Now, if you can't be bothered to write a novel because you won't get megabucks for it, then clearly you neither love writing, nor do you feel any particular drive to do it. So why should I care if you never write your novel?

And, by the way, books were being pirated centuries ago - and probably before that, too. Dublin was a big centre of pirated books in the eighteenth century, for example - and yet somehow the book industry has survived that, as well as the Xerox machine, the scanner, the library, and the good old "here, I've finished this - you have it". This is not a new "problem" - whereas the culture of making obscene incomes from little or no real work is becoming the defining problem of the modern world.

about 4 years ago
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AU Gov't Still Wants ISPs To Solve Illegal Downloads

psychodelicacy Re:And I hereby request (218 comments)

No, the ISPs are the people who build and maintain the roads on which murderers travel to their victims' houses. Or maybe they're the people who sell cooking knives. Or maybe they're the people who provide alcohol to unstable people who then get mad and murder someone.

Equally, you could say that the ISPs are like the owners of Xerox machines, which allow people to make unauthorised copies of copyrighted materials. Or maybe they're like libraries, which allow people to read copyrighted material for free.

The point, I think, is that there is no good analogy for the roles of the parties in this kind of "crime" because it's the result of a pretty much unprecedented set of circumstances related to advances in technology.

more than 4 years ago
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Amazon Surrenders To Macmillan On eBook Pricing

psychodelicacy Re:Monopoly? (437 comments)

I'm not necessarily talking about the sciences. I'm an academic in the humanities, and it's an accepted fact that some publishers have better editing and proofreading than others, some are better at procuring good-quality research than others, and some just turn out any old crap in order to meet some kind of quota. So I definitely take the publisher into account when deciding whether or not to spend a hundred dollars or more on a book for work. When it comes to books for leisure, I would tend to avoid self-published works unless they look wildly interesting or I have a recommendation from someone I trust. This doesn't apply to anything published on the internet, of course - if I'm not paying for it, I don't really mind if it turns out to be rubbish!

more than 4 years ago
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Amazon Surrenders To Macmillan On eBook Pricing

psychodelicacy Re:Monopoly? (437 comments)

Agreed - and it's the same in publishing.

The question of reputation is central in academic publishing. The same book will be at an advantage if it is published by Macmillan rather than brought out by an unknown press, or published online. The large and respected presses carry an automatic sense that their books are likely to be well-written and worth reading. Once an author has a good reputation, maybe they can start publishing under Creative Commons licences or the like. Lawrence Lessig and Jonathan Zittrain have both done this - but only after spending a long time building up their reputations and writing a lot of other books under - presumably - the usual contracts. And their books come out with "big-name" publishers like Penguin and Yale alongside being freely available to download.

You just can't ignore the cachet of the publisher when it comes to books. It's one of the factors that academics use to evaluate whether a new book is worth their time or not, and that in itself often reflects the fact that the good publishers provide invaluable services in reviewing and editing.

I'm not defending Macmillan's move, btw - just pointing out that it's not quite as easy as it might seem to write the publishers out of the process.

more than 4 years ago
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Vulgar Comment On Newspaper Site Costs Man His Job

psychodelicacy Re:Kurt Greenbaum, you are stupid, puritanical scu (643 comments)

Because students don't have rights to anonymity or free speech?

Come on - the privacy policy of the site states that personal information won't be shared with third parties. That applies whether the site user is a child or an adult, unless there's some good legal reason. A teenager posting the word "pussy" is not, as far as I'm aware, a crime in the US, so why on earth would it be okay to report them to their school if they did that?

more than 4 years ago
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MIT Project "Gaydar" Shakes Privacy Assumpitons

psychodelicacy Re:MIT Gaydar should be Facebook app (508 comments)

You're not entirely right there, you know. Bisexual people often have the added stigma of being hated by gay people who assume that they're either too scared to come out properly, or just having a laugh. I've had this discussion with a group of friends, and a surprising number of them (otherwise completely tolerant, liberal people) said they'd feel uncomfortable dating a bisexual person, simply because they're bisexual. So often the people who hate or avoid or dislike you for being bisexual wouldn't feel the same about you if you were gay.

about 5 years ago

Submissions

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Amazon UK deleting unfavourable Spore reviews

psychodelicacy psychodelicacy writes  |  about 6 years ago

psychodelicacy writes "There's a storm brewing on the amazon.co.uk comments pages for EA's new game Spore. Slashdot already reported that the Amazon US site had been inundated with unfavourable reviews because of the game's restrictive DRM, but it seems that Amazon UK are not being as liberal in allowing their customers the right to speak. I'm one of many who have apparently had reviews complaining about the DRM deleted."
Link to Original Source
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BBC makes Dr. Who fan take down knitting patterns

psychodelicacy psychodelicacy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

psychodelicacy writes "The Open Rights Group has taken up the case of a Dr. Who fan who has had to remove her knitting patterns for Dr. Who monsters from her website after the BBC claimed she was infringing its copyright. The claim in its cease-and-desist email is that the knitter is "supplying DR WHO items", which seems tenuous at best, since all that was available on the site were patterns, provided under a Creative Commons licence. The BBC claims that, although the patterns were provided non-commercially, they were being made up and the products subsequently sold on eBay. Although the BBC admits that it doesn't "have any plans to offer any knitted toys", clearly it still doesn't want anyone else making any profit from such a product."
Link to Original Source
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UK Blogger fined for "threatening" policem

psychodelicacy psychodelicacy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

psychodelicacy writes "The BBC reports that a blogger from Wales, Gavin Brent, has been arrested and fined after complaining on his blog about his treatment by a police officer. One of his comments was taken as a threat against the officer's family. Brent denies that was his intention, claiming that he was simply "letting off steam". The blog entry in question has now been removed, so it's not possible to evaluate the prosecuting magistrates' claim that the comment was clearly menacing in the context of the blog."
Link to Original Source
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The future of the internet

psychodelicacy psychodelicacy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

psychodelicacy (1170611) writes "The BBC reports on a new book by cyberlaw scholar Jonathan Zittrain: "The Future of the Internet: and How to Stop It". The article focusses on Zittrain's distinction between the "sterile" and the "generative" — the former including technology which is easily controlled by the manufacturer or by outside agencies (such as car technology which can be turned into a bug at the command of the FBI), and the latter including the PC, a programmable machine whose workings are controllable by the user. The generative net is under threat, the article suggests, at least partly from "malign exploitation" which leads to tighter controls and, potentially, a user-led adoption of closed systems."
Link to Original Source
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Online Free Expression Day

psychodelicacy psychodelicacy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

psychodelicacy (1170611) writes "Media watchdog Reporters Without Borders has launched the first "Online Free Expression Day". In a cyber-demonstration designed by Saatchi and Saatchi, internet users can create an avatar and join protests in online versions of places where protest is normally restricted — Tiananmen Square in Beijing and Cuba's Revolution Square being two of the choices. The organisation has also updated its list of "Internet Enemies" to include Zimbabwe and Ethiopia."
Link to Original Source
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21st Century Sins

psychodelicacy psychodelicacy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

psychodelicacy writes "The Vatican has suggested seven "modern mortal sins" to augment the traditional deadly sins. Included in the list of things that could send you straight to hell are environmental pollution, "morally debatable experiments", and genetic manipulation. The article isn't clear on whether this is an official doctrinal pronouncement by the Church, but the story presumably has ramifications for the involvement of Catholics in scientific research as well as their involvement with large corporations (causing poverty and accumulating excessive wealth are also in the list)."
Link to Original Source
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Jonathan Zittrain as interview guest

psychodelicacy psychodelicacy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

psychodelicacy (1170611) writes "Hi, /. Considering the recent furore on /. over what Jonathan Zittrain may or may not have said about the future of the internet, I really think you should have him as an interview guest. Having heard him talk and read his stuff, I think you'd find him very good value as a guest. His email is zittrain@law.harvard.edu. If you want a "personal introduction", you can tell him that Beth Tovey recommended him to you. Cheers, psychodelicacy"

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