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Interview: Ask Limor Fried About Open-Source Hardware and Adafruit

ptorrone Re:Are you backing away from Open Source HW? (139 comments)

hi there, i'm one of the folks who work with limor at adafruit and i'm familiar with this product. this is one of the few products that we had to sign many NDA's in order to develop, so we are not able to open source it as per the agreement(s). for that reason we do not put the OSHW logo on it. we will be doing more with BTLE and for those we will have fully open source designs.

about 8 months ago
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Adafruit To Teach Electronics Through Puppets In New Kids Show

ptorrone Re:Hans the 555 Timer Chip??? (68 comments)

it is possible to even make a sponge (bob) exciting and fun for kids :)

about a year and a half ago
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Open-Source Hardware Hacker Ladyada Awarded Entrepreneur of the Year

ptorrone Re:Company, good, as a person, I'm not sure (56 comments)

i do not believe this person claiming to work with limor has, could you provide any evidence at all?

about a year and a half ago
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Open-Source Hardware Hacker Ladyada Awarded Entrepreneur of the Year

ptorrone Re:Company, good, as a person, I'm not sure (56 comments)

hi "anonymous" - there isn't anyone that's worked with us at adafruit and limor that hasn't continued to work with us in some way that i am aware of. i've been part of just about every meeting or interaction on any of our products and limor has never said anything about "money" ever. if you've actually worked with her (or us) you'd know how bizarre your comment is. anyone is welcome to contact mitch altman, or jay silver or anyone we work with (we're very proud of all the makers we work with) - everyone at adafruit loves working here, it's a real family and you're free to contact any of us and me directly and i'll gladly have you chat with anyone here if you're actually someone we've worked with. no full time employee has left the company and we've never fired anyone :)

about a year and a half ago
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2012 EFF Pioneer Award Winners Revealed

ptorrone Congrats Bunnie! (19 comments)

Bunnie is a hero to hardware hackers, this is great!

about 2 years ago
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The Unspoken Rules of Open Source Hardware

ptorrone Re:"No clones?" (64 comments)

ghostworks, you're right! open source software actually has stronger protection mechanism under copyright. copyright does not apply to electronic / physical designs.

tv-b-gone (the name) is trademarked. so while someone could make a direct clone, if they were selling it using the name there is some protection against that. that's really all we have in hardware. our trademarks and our copyrights for things like our code, documentation, etc.

all hardware has weak protection, as in pretty much none. maybe a patent in some cases of course. there isn't a license that will protect you if you want to release your hardware as "open source" or keep it closed - so we need to come up with other things if we want to share our hardware.

so far the social norms have worked out, we're not trying to clone each other out of business because we see the value in some of these unspoken rules. maybe it's going to end soon, we'll see - i wanted to write about what's going on now.

more than 2 years ago
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The Unspoken Rules of Open Source Hardware

ptorrone Re:It doesn't seem very open sourcey to me... (64 comments)

paying royalties isn't required. what's happen (hence the name, unspoken rules) is that large companies - sparkfun for example will offer a kit designer a royalty if they, sparkfun, are going to manufacture the design. do they need to do this? no, of course not. but that's what's going on. i believe because of this the oshw movement has grown fast, solid and more kit makers are sharing their hardware.

for the hobbyist and maker out there making a clone or something else that doesn't really apply. to be clear, you will not get "in trouble" for anything. hardware isn't generally protectable any way, so we have some social norms that have happened. will it work out? who knows - my article outlined what's happening.

more than 2 years ago
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The Unspoken Rules of Open Source Hardware

ptorrone Re:Christ, do they form a drum circle too? (64 comments)

hi not-really-anonymous :)

*i'm not going to run an oshw foundation, ever. i said that in the article and on the mailing list(s) we're both on. i'm not the best person for that at all.
*bruce perens self-nominated himself for his legal effort thing, i suggested he nominate someone besides himself.
*with makerbot and shapeways i think new york might just be a 3d printing center, we'll see!
*i'm glad you value our prices.
*it's interesting to hear your perception of sparkfun is that they mark up things 6x.

see you around!

more than 2 years ago
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The Unspoken Rules of Open Source Hardware

ptorrone Re:Don't be a jerk (64 comments)

vlm - that's a pretty good summary :) my article detailed what most of the oshw makers tend to do. as more folks join in, it will probably change. with physical hardware there is a social element that you get that's different than publishing code and emailing on mailing lists. when you make and share hardware you get a chance to meet the designer and/or the users of your hardware.

re: ham radio article, you're exactly right. you'd think there would be a ton of overlap, but it's very very small. there are lots of reasons for this i think and the communities are starting to interact more, but a lot of people are surprised. if you want to write that article drop me a line.

more than 2 years ago
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The Unspoken Rules of Open Source Hardware

ptorrone Re:Christ, do they form a drum circle too? (64 comments)

hiya - you can check out the dozens of other articles, talks and overviews for what you're looking for - just google around or you can also email me and i can point you to a few. this article was specifically about the rules we all seem to follow, not "how open source hardware filters down to users". if you're interested in a specific one about that, here's one i wrote about someone who took a design we worked on and funded a kickstarter, by doing open source we enabled people to build better, and innovate quicker:

Open Source Hardware is Kick-Starting Kickstarter!
http://blog.makezine.com/2011/10/20/how-open-source-hardware-is-kick-starting-kickstarter/

more than 2 years ago
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Autodesk + Instructables: For Makers?

ptorrone Re:What Autodesk is up to (77 comments)

wow, this is the best comment i've seen on /. in forever.

more than 2 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

>>No, you're smart, about some things, I think. You seem to know your way around electronics, for example. You're terribly dumb about argument and logic, though. This is a common problem for technical people: they think because they are smart at some things, that this intelligence carries over. It doesn't.

take it back!

>>You still think you have a point, for example, even though it's clear you do not. But at least you wised up and stopped trying to talk about what I've published.

i'm going to keep pulling this string. say "ALL" again :)

about 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

>>I've repeatedly pointed out the fact that you claimed ALL makers SHOULD learn Chinese, and you've refused to retract that claim, and you've repeatedly and directly argued in support of that claim. To shrug it off as just a headline is dishonest. Either directly retract the claim, or it stands. That's how it works.

did you read past the headline? did you read the article? ...**yes, I think a lot of us are going to find speaking, reading, and writing the language of the soon-to-be biggest economy in the world and, who makes almost everything, is a good idea. It’s something to consider learning, starting now, particularly for makers, especially the ones who run maker businesses.**

"good idea, something to consider" - see those words. you need to read past a headline on slashdot to get to them. now that it's settled.

based on your name calling, i hearby ask you to retract your statement! you said "I mean honestly ... this guy is smart, and he says it's going to take him more than two years of ALL his free time, and a total of about 5 years, to become fluent."

obviously you do not agree with yourself, retract it!

>>It's amazing that you don't realize that everything you're attacking me for in this regard, necessarily also applies to you. It's not like you're not writing as much as I am, and throwing around at least as many insults; worse, for you, I'm the one trying to focus on the actual argument, and you're the one continually engaging in ad hominem by trying to compare whom I know, what I've written, etc.

i think this is a blast, you're completely bonkers. this is like a fun toy that never runs out of batteries. i pull the string and you keep saying "ALL". i pull the string now.

about 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

>>Look, I know you're very slow-witted, but I already explained this. Try to keep up. I'll say it again: it is logically irrelevant. I won't mention them because it literally doesn't matter to the argument, and it debases it. Whom I know doesn't matter, and what I've done doesn't matter, to my case, which is built on fundamental logical principles, as outlined in my example with the sets. If you could explain to me how any of those things could matter to my case, I would gladly provide a list. But I don't think you'll be able to do it.

you can't list anything because they only exist in your head, just list *any* of them already :)

>>Honestly, in truth, I cannot remember them all. There's been many, and it's been a long time. In addition to the two books I've co-authored, there's been maybe several newspapers and tech magazines ... and that's not even including the online publications, like Slashdot and oreilly.com. And I've turned down at least twice as many as I've written for, including an offer to write a book for O'Reilly, many moons ago.

ok, again - be specific - post a link to the books you've co-authored! ISBNS please!

>>I have won several awards for writing and news, including an award -- sponsored by O'Reilly, with a cash prize, no less -- for a news web site I ran. I don't see how awards mean anything at all, though. It just means one or more people at one time thought they should recognize you for something. That's pretty boring to me, and if I had a Pulitzer it would not make any difference to me.

which award, when, post a link :)

>>You apparently do not realize that the only evidence that I "love to argue on Slashdot" also directly implies that YOU love to argue on Slashdot.

this is like a studying some goo one finds in a swamp. stay still and answer the questions already or no sugar for you my fine specimen! :)

>>It's funny that you think you're a big deal, and that you think you've won a single argument here.

>>Yes, specifics that could not possibly help or hurt your case that all makers SHOULD learn Chinese, nor my case that this is an asinine claim for you to make.

again, read the article. it's about makers who run maker businesses that work with companies in china, i even list out ones that do this now and how they're either learning mandarin or visiting frequently. look, i know it's hard to read past headlines. maybe you don't leave slashdot that often, but try it out sometime! if you read the comments no one is debating about "should" or the title or the title of the article because it's clearly explained in the first paragraph. the MAKE reader are extremely smart and can hold many ideas and thoughts together. slashdot trollers are not know for that ability as seen here :)

>>Perhaps, perhaps not. But I am unburdened by caring what most people think of me. It's a gift. I am not upset, in fact. I do have a problem: a nearly, but not quite, pathological need to point out the logical fallacies of people who are being douchebags, whether anyone's watching or not.

that's called trollin' trolly dude, and you're in the right place. you're completely bonkers and it's awesome to watch :)

please tell me more!

about 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

in 2011 it's awesome to watch a meltdown like this, throwing tantrums, resorting to calling people "douchebags" when they ask you to back up anything you're saying with specifics and just instead freaking out in the slashdot comments that no one reads - keep the dream alive man, this is your life :)

>>Sigh. No. Do your own homework, if you care.

just list'em out, what's the big deal? really, you why can't you name all the publications you've written for? is the list too long for the meager form here? :)

>>Correct. And? [slashdot.org]

Logitech Buys Slim Devices
On October 18th, 2006 with 80 comments

haha! that's what you're considering "articles"? it's a news item with 3 sentences from almost *5 years ago*. where do you store all the pulitzers!?

make way everyone, william blake coming through here!

>>However, I do take your response as confirmation that you really do find worth and value in relative comparison of publication credits. And I find that to be extremely sad and pathetic.

i'm still bummed you won't consider me for your future publication that you may start. maybe we can work something out where i intern or something!

look dude, just face it - you love to argue on slashdot, that's your hobby. mine is making open source hardware and now learning mandarin. think of the hours you're spending talking to me about *my article* and walking around all pissed after getting smacked down here. you thought this would be the usual trolling, but i asked you for specifics you can't provide and you look, foolish. not to anyone here, no one reads this, just yourself and that's why you're so upset :)

about 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

>>You're a damned liar.
>>You're a damned liar.
>>You're a damned liar.
>>You're a damned liar.
.

this is *awesome* i imagine a big ole' man-child meltdown, complete with jumping up and down screaming the same thing over and over.

>>I'd go over my significant list of publication credits, but I'll just note that I've writen articles and contributed to books -- as a writer, and tech editor -- at O'Reilly, just to make you feel more foolish, and leave it at that.

great, name a few. i'm morbidly curious about you vast library of accomplishments at o'reilly! you also spelled "written wrong", it's not "writen". but you knew that, perhaps this is some type of grammar test! perhaps now i can get that gig at troll-weekly you dangled.

>>... and? Are you trying to imply something? I can't see what. I've written hundreds of articles on Slashdot ... so? It seems like you are trying to make yourself seem superior to me just because you've written things, and you (ignorantly) assume I have not. Even if I didn't have a ton of publication credits, that would STILL be stupid.

trolly comments on slashdot calling people "douchebags" is not an "article" :) but hey, it's what defines who you are, live it, love it - way to set the world on fire, you are living the dream :)

about 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

>>I refused to do so, because it's fallacious. If I provide a list, you won't be convinced by anything, nor should you: my argument is not based on what I know, but the fact that you didn't make your case. Further, I didn't ask their permission to mention them to some douchebag on Slashdot, even if I wanted to.

you don't know anyone at MAKE, or anyone who actually makes things as business and works with china on a regular basis, you're ashamed of your trolly comments here that know one reads, that's why you can't stand behind them with any real facts, names or anything remotely resembling a coherent sentence :) you're claiming to know maker owned businesses but cannot provide any examples at all.

>>If you don't believe all makers "should" learn Chinese, then if you had half a damned brain you would have said from the outset, "I don't believe all makers 'should' learn Chinese, I just think it's a good idea to consider." That would have solved the problem. By not correcting your error, and allowing it to persist, you've necessarily implied that you continue to agree with it.

if you read the article you'll see where where i specifically say it's something good to consider. you should read past the headline on slashdot, read the full article and then comment (on MAKE) about improvements to it.

>>Remind me to never hire you if I start a periodical of my own.

drat, my hopes and dreams of being an editor at you new publication "troll-weekly" are now over. c'mon, dude - we both know you'll never actually create something besides commenting here, this is what you "make" , this is all you have - this defines you. you know you're never going to start a magazine or have people read *articles* you write, at your best you'll see how many times you call people "douchebags" on slashdot, when they point out you're wrong. dude - slashdot, you're on slashdot commenting about my article :)

about 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

pudge, you're claiming to know people at MAKE, but it's pretty clear you don't. you're claiming to know maker owned businesses but cannot provide any examples at all. my article outlines what's going on with actual makers, people i know - i've listed them out and talked to all of them. can you do the same? if you're still confused by the article, here is the first section, if you've read the article, not just a headline on slashdot you could have avoid this meltdown and name calling.

"In this week’s article I’ll talk about why I think it’s a good idea for any maker to consider picking up some new language skills and specifically what I’m doing. A lot of my articles tend to be about the future (I can’t wait to look back on these 5 years from now). So, yes, I think a lot of us are going to find speaking, reading, and writing the language of the soon-to-be biggest economy in the world and, who makes almost everything, is a good idea. It’s something to consider learning, starting now, particularly for makers, especially the ones who run maker businesses."

a good idea for "any" maker to consider :)

about 3 years ago
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Why People Who Make Things Should Learn Chinese

ptorrone Re:Amen (588 comments)

>>For THOSE SPECIFIC COMPANIES, fine. But what's that got to do with all the other maker-owned companies? You DID NOT make the case that this necessarily applies to ALL such companies. You merely hoped that by pointing out that it works for some companies, and YOU like it, therefore everyone else SHOULD do it. That's extremely poor reasoning.

again, read the article - it's for "makers" maybe that's not for you- read the comments *there* and review the long list of makers who are visiting china each year - this has already happened and will continue to happen. two founders of 2 of the top maker companies moved to asia already. if you read the make site you will see my follow ups with specific examples, past/present/and future.

>>I actually know a lot of people involved in it. I've been following it since O'Reilly put out the first MAKE (I still have a copy of it around here somewhere). I've done some of my own projects, and have many friends who do a lot more than I do (some of whom run their own maker businesses). And I know, very well, how diverse the people involved in it are. You apparently do not. You are closed-minded and think everyone should act as you would act, instead of trying different things and being themselves.

really? i've been there from the start, can you be specific who you "know" ? can you list maker owned companies of people you actually know, what they do and if they get goods from china? have you talked to them about this?

saying someone is "close-minded" by proposing makers consider learning chinese is, well, laughable - keep trollin' !

about 3 years ago

Submissions

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Hardware is now open (sourced) for business

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  about 9 months ago

ptorrone (638660) writes "CNBC has an interesting article about the growing trend of hardware companies going open-source "The open-source hardware movement is migrating from the garage to the marketplace. Companies that follow an open-source philosophy make their physical designs and software code available to the public. By doing so, these companies engage a wave of makers, hobbyists and designers who don't just want to buy products, but have a hand in developing them". Also in the article, New York City based, open-source hardware company, Adafruit, hit $20 million in revenue this year, tripling year over year."
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Hardware Hacker Ladyada Proposes Patent and Education Reform to President of USA

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  about a year and a half ago

ptorrone writes "In a welcome turn of events, President Barack Obama spoke directly to the patent troll problem and the need for more comprehensive patent reform yesterday in a "Fireside Hangout" — a live question and answer session hosted in a Google+ hangout. The President was responding to a question by the prominent electrical engineer and entrepreneur Limor "Ladyada" Fried of Adafruit Industries, who in 2009 won an EFF Pioneer Award for her work with free software and open-source hardware."
Link to Original Source
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Open-source hardware hacker Ladyada awarded Entrepreneur of the Year

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  about a year and a half ago

ptorrone writes "Limor "Ladyada" Fried of open-source hardware company Adafruit Industries was awarded Entrepreneur of the Year by Entrepreneur Magazine. From the article — "Recognizable by her signature vivid-pink locks, Fried (or Ladyada, as she is known on the internet) is one of the dominant forces behind the maker movement--a legion of do-it-yourself-minded folks who create cool things by tweaking everyday technology. Last year New York City-based Adafruit did a booming $10 million trade in sales of DIY open-source electronic hardware kits"."
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Open-source Raspberry Pi WebIDE alpha released

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  about 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "Adafruit, the NYC based open-source hardware company led by Ladyada released their Open-source Raspberry Pi WebIDE alpha today. It's goal is to be "The easiest way to develop code on your Raspberry Pi". To get up and running head on over to learn.adafruit.com/webideand follow the installation and setup instructions. It uses Bitbucket, and any code changes you make will be synced to your Bitbucket account. Adafruit chose Bitbucket over Github because they offer free secure accounts, which is very important for a Web-based IDE."
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Updated Educational Linux Distribution for Raspberry Pi

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  about 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "Open-source hardware company, Adafruit, released an update to its educational Linux Distribution for Raspberry Pi. This is Adafruit's second distro, Occidentalis v0.2. Rubus occidentalis (The black raspberry). It is derived from Raspbian Wheezy August 16. Adafruit has made a few key changes to make it more hardware-hacker friendly! Truncated image — only 2.6G now to fit on any 4G card, raspi-config notice retained on boot, removed persistent wlan0 entry, password-change reminder on login, added RTC and lm-sensors kernel module, includes kernel modules for: DS1307, AD626 I2C digipots, HMC6352, BMP085, ADS1015 & PWM/Servo kernel module for easy PWM/Servo control on GPIO#18. The distro still includes: Updated Hexxeh firmware, I2C and hardware SPI support, I2C/SPI modules initialized on boot, sshd on boot, ssh keygen on first boot, runs avahi daemon (Bonjour client) and is called raspberrypi.local, Realtek RTL8188CUS wifi support and one wire support on GPIO #4 when loaded!"
Link to Original Source
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Adafruit Raspberry Pi Educational Linux Distro

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  about 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "Open-source hardware company Adafruit released a Linux Raspberry Pi distro for hardware hackers and teaching electronics. This distro comes with SPI, I2C, & OneWire WiFi. It also has some things to make overall hacking easier such sshd on startup (with key generation on first boot) andBonjour (so you can simply ssh raspberrypi.local from any computer on the local network. It's called Occidentalis v0.1. Rubus occidentalis(the black raspberry) derived fromRaspbian Wheezy and available for download here."
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Counterfeit Open Source Hardware — Knockoffs 101

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "“Clone” in many of the the hardware circles I’m usually in means a knockoff, including the logo, etc. It’s made to fool people; however I think I will say “counterfeit” in addition to clone since there were a couple people on Slashdot that were confused about clone versus counterfeit. This might make it easier to explain exactly what I’m talking about. So this week I’m going to outline some counterfeits to look out for when you’re looking for a deal on an Arduino or any other types of open source hardware."
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Is it time for Hacker Scouts?

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine asks is it "Time For Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts2.0?" What might the future of education might be like if it were based on online & earned skill badges, and what could the future of traditional organizations for kids, like the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, be like in a very modern, tech-savy world. Social networks and the maker movement are the perfect intersection of where the kids of today are, but we don’t see “leaderboards” for skills yet, we only see them for video games. Is it time for Hacker Scouts?"
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The {Unspoken} Rules of Open Source Hardware

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine's latest article talks about some of the {unspoken} rules most/all the open-source hardware community seems to follow. Why? Because the core group of people who’ve been doing what is collectively called “open source hardware” know each other — they're friends, they overlap and compete in some ways, but they all work towards a common goal: sharing their works to make the world a better place and to stand on each others shoulders and not each others toes : ) There will be some folks who agree strongly with what they've outlined as “unspoken rules,” others, will completely disagree with many points too. That’s great, it’s time we start this conversation!"
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Open-source wearable platform - The FLORA

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "Limor "Ladyada" Fried's NYC based Open-source electronic's studio, Adafruit, today announced their new open wearable platform called the FLORA (blog post & video). The FLORA is Arduino compatible as well as supporting a variety of sensors and add-on devices including: Bluetooth, GPS, 3-axis accelerometer, compass module, flex sensor, piezo, IR LED, push button, embroidered + capacitive keypad, OLED and more. The first round of hardware is in the hands of testers to create wearable projects."
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The Ultimate Kit Guide from MAKE

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE's "Ultimate Guide to Kits" is out and it's one of the best things they have ever created for tinkerers, makers and hackers. To promote it and their new Kit Reviews site, they're running a "Kit-A-Day" giveaway that includes thousands of dollars in Maker Shed merchandise between now (last Friday, actually) and Xmas. Included are 5 Makerbots-- 1 was already given away, but 4 are left. The guides the biggest selection of open-source hardware in one place!"
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Is running an open-source hardware in NYC a good i

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE takes a look at the benefits of running an open-source hardware company (or any company) in New York City. It's expensive, there are a lot of constraints but the author believes it's one of the best places in the world to run a business. Check out the Manufacturing 2.0 map (PDF). They also mention the open-source 3D printer company MakerBot is NYC based and just received $10m in funding."
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How Open Source Hardware is Kick-Starting Kickstar

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "Imagine waking up and seeing your design for a circuit being used in a product by someone who never contacted you to ask if it was okay. You will not get any payment for their usage of your design, they’ve raised over $31,000 dollars, and they’re selling something you worked really hard on. You have no control over what someone does with something you made. Is this a nightmare? Perhaps for some, but this is actually a dream come true for others who do open-source hardware. MAKE magazine profiles a maker using open-source hardware for his now-funded project and how many are using open hardware for their works."
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A 3D Life - MakerBot gets $10 million in funding (

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine sat down with Bre Pettis, founder of the open-source 3D printer, the MakerBot and asked about their recent round of $10 million in funding. What does it mean to have venture capital behind an open source product, what is the future of 3D printing and how many MakerBots are there "in the wild" — all these questions answered and more!
 "

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Autodesk + Instructables.. For Makers?

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE magazine has published an in-depth look at what the recent acquisition of Instructables by Autodesk means for makers and the DIY movement. MAKE suggests it wasn't about getting the millions of members or projects at Instructables or unselling Autodesk tools. Instead, the acquisition was more about creating many Instructable-like communities around Autodesk's new free and trial tools including their 3D printing site and service Autodesk123D."
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_Are Google+ Hangouts the Next Hackerspaces?

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  about 3 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine is reporting on the current trends of makers and hackers adopting google+ faster than Facebook. MAKE goes on to show how hackerspaces and individual makers are using google+ hangout video, with up to 10 participants, to show and share their projects. The article also brings up features needed for the google+ hangout tool as well as how to stream the video sessions to services like Ustream so an audience can watch the hackerspace "show-and-tells" without hitting the 10 person limit."
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Is the Rise of Wearable Electronics Finally Here?

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 3 years ago

ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine takes a look at the last ten years or so of "wearable electronics". From wireless watches to LCD goggles, MAKE predicts we are collectively entering a new era of wearables. As the price for enabling components drops, always-on connectivity in our pockets and purses increases, and access to low-costmanufacturing resources and know-howrises we’ll see innovation continue to push into these most personal forms of computing."
Link to Original Source
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Open source LED cufflinks - pulsate like a Mac

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 3 years ago

" rel="nofollow">ptorrone writes "Open source hardware maker Adafruit has released the first "open source LED cufflinks" called iCufflinks which pulse like an Apple Mac's "breathing" LED (video). The team at Adafruit reversed engineered the glow and has published the source code, CAD files and schematics on GitHub — perhaps the geekiest Father's Day gift of all time."
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Why Google Choosing Arduino Matters

ptorrone ptorrone writes  |  more than 3 years ago

ptorrone writes "Earlier this week at Google I/O, Google announced the Android Open Accessory kit which uses the open source hardware platform, Arduino. MAKE magazine has an in-depth article about why Google choosing the Arduino matters, why Google picked Arduino and some predictions about what's next for Apple's "Made for iPod" as well and what Microsoft/Nokia/Skype should do to keep up."
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