Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Microsoft Defies Court Order, Will Not Give Emails To US Government

pupsocket they are just beating up the government (396 comments)

This same line -- shifting the discussion to the long legal process -- was identical in the prelude to savaging Federal Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson and overturning years of defeat in their trial for anticompetitive practices.

Microsoft won't accede to the power of the law. That's all. It has nothing to do with Microsoft's policy toward customers, though they'll say anything.

9 hours ago
top

Murder Suspect Asked Siri Where To Hide a Dead Body

pupsocket Re:Gators (160 comments)

correct spelling: damned Sirial murderers

about three weeks ago
top

Silicon Valley Doesn't Have an Attitude Problem, OK?

pupsocket The Industrial Era disagrees (262 comments)

Henry George looked from a high hill toward the growing San Franscisco in the 1870's and realized that rising land prices were a bug in in the industrial economy. They punished success.

His book sold more copies than any other in the 19th century in the United States: Progress and Poverty.

about three weeks ago
top

Was America's Top Rocketeer a Communist Spy? The FBI Thought So

pupsocket Re:White Werhner von Braun may be many things... (165 comments)

An excellent characterization.

As I understand it, he was arrested for complaining that the war was not going well, which everyone knew but people in high places were forbidden to mention. His problem wasn't that the Nazis were Nazis, but that they were the losing.

As a technocrat under extenuating circumstances, he illustrates the worst moral worthlessness to which a technocrat can fall, and so should not be esteemed. He should never have been celebrated as an American hero.

about a month ago
top

Was America's Top Rocketeer a Communist Spy? The FBI Thought So

pupsocket Re:White Werhner von Braun may be many things... (165 comments)

The kindest thing you can say about him was that he had tunnel vision. He was an ambitious man who did not find murderous slavery to be sufficient reason to just take orders. No one can be forced to lead as uniquely as von Braun or forced to fight so hard for control of a project.

Was his behavior understandable? Yes, if you believe he was blinded by obsession. Was it justified? Not by a moon shot.

about a month ago
top

Was America's Top Rocketeer a Communist Spy? The FBI Thought So

pupsocket Re:White Werhner von Braun may be many things... (165 comments)

From the article:

"The actual manufacturing was done by prisoners from the concentration camp Mittelbau-Dora. As the historian Michael J. Neufeld has documented, von Braun went so far as to handpick detainees with technical qualifications for this work. (The prisoners were worked literally to death. In all, about 12,000 died producing von Braun’s rockets; for comparison, the rockets themselves would kill an estimated 9,000 people, many of them civilians.)"

about 1 month ago
top

The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train

pupsocket Re:Railroads killed by the government... (195 comments)

I'm not against trucks. I just think that trains that can carry 600 people downtown to downtown at 300 kph shouldn't be something citizens of the United States can experience only overseas.

P.S. If I wanted to hide, I'd head to the old farm. It's pretty hard to hide in a subway.

about a month and a half ago
top

The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train

pupsocket Re:Railroads killed by the government... (195 comments)

The Nordic report cited above indicates that deterioration from environmental effects is not significant. Doesn't sound right, but then none of this matches intuition.

Speculation based on cursory reading: Since trucks do their worst where pavement is rough, the freeze-thaw cycle doesn't get a chance to do its worst because the trucks are too quick at expanding fissures and pounding the edges of cracks. Once trucks start tearing up a roadway, the destruction accelerates because tires bang asphalt at all angles and concentrate their load on a smaller area with shuddering stress.

about a month and a half ago
top

FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars

pupsocket Re:The car will need a license. (435 comments)

... the least you could do is wait until someone is confirmed to be doing something 'bad' before you punish them ...

We are sympathetic to your point of view, Citizen, but the approach you advocate would delay the expansion of government control over your life. We trust you are not hostile to the radiant future where cars have more autonomy than you do.

about a month and a half ago
top

The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train

pupsocket Re:Railroads killed by the government... (195 comments)

What you list are economic activities. Those are what humans intend to subsidize. We do not intend to favor specific businesses or to kill off businesses that would otherwise thrive.

The trucking industry operates with large enough organizations to influence policy in its favor. That industry is as large as it is because it has an unfair cost advantage over other modes of transport and because it has successfully hidden its subsidies while ensuring the failure of rail transportation.

Well, that's business. The fundamental corruption is in the legislature.

about a month and a half ago
top

FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars

pupsocket Re:The car will need a license. (435 comments)

True, but not absolute. Giving other people or organizations an unlimited right to endanger me isn't really freedom.

Trucks should have good brakes and restaurants need sanitary kitchens and surgeons need to know what they're doing.

about a month and a half ago
top

Point-of-Sale System Bought On eBay Yields Treasure Trove of Private Data

pupsocket Re:Small business owners (68 comments)

The research was not about the scandal of data left behind. That data proved to be an excellent fossil showing a business running an insecure system without basic protections, failing even to install security updates for seven years.

This, though, only confirms your own account and probably falls well within the known range of shortcomings.

So ...

Doesn't HP, for whom the author of this report works, compete with sellers of point-of-sale systems, which have become default inventory and accounting systems for many small businesses?

After all, this is not a story about how data was actually used in a crime. The article: "Even second-hand POS systems aren't cheap, so it's unlikely that cybercriminals would spend hundreds of dollars on a chance that a few contain personal data." The businesses who use the system are not directly harmed, are probably defunct, and don't have IT expertise in house.

If there were headlines about this method being used or complaints from banks and law enforcement, it would not be necessary to issue this report.

Just a guess, but I'd say that only insurance companies, card clearance companies, and governments have a stake here, and they are the intended audience. They have the clout to ban resales, or at least to erect high barriers to resale involving certified wiping and refurbishment, which would help sales of new systems and create new opportunities for service charges.

about a month and a half ago
top

The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train

pupsocket Re:Railroads killed by the government... (195 comments)

a pretty good case of 'user pays'.

More than 99% of road wear is caused by heavy trucks. Once again, humans subsidize businesses.

about a month and a half ago
top

The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train

pupsocket Re:Railroads killed by the government... (195 comments)

The long-distance railroads in the U.S. were built by giving away land stolen from other peoples. Not just land to build the lines on, but a checkerboard of land for miles on both sides of the track, land that the railroads could sell to recoup their capital.

Many of these railroads were later bought out by John D. Rockefeller so that he could kill his competitors in the oil business by making it unprofitable for anyone else to transport petroleum.

Subsidy and monopoly are the parents of American railroads. Only businesses benefit. Humans can take the highway.

about a month and a half ago
top

FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars

pupsocket The car will need a license. (435 comments)

This is where the FBI is heading: expensive licenses with high compliance requirements, including data-sharing on demand with law enforcement agencies.

The licenses will be feasible for larger organizations with no particular fealty to one individual, unless that individual is the controlling shareholder of a closely held corporation. Individual licenses will be as rare as private jets.

There are sound reasons for this approach, and any suggestions how it can be executed without expanding police power or corporate control over daily life will be eagerly registered.

about a month and a half ago
top

FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars

pupsocket Re:Less. (435 comments)

Ex. we could allow cars to drive themselves on the highway, but require a human to get the car to the highway.

With some exceptions.

Where a city sits at the hub of a suburban train system, parking problems and congestion resurface in the communities closest to the feeder stations. A system of circulating, self-navigating vehicles, shuttling between home and train station, would reduce the monetary and psychic costs of commuting and the land asphalted for train-station parking.

about a month and a half ago
top

FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars

pupsocket Pooled car fleets (435 comments)

Auto-navigating fleets could displace street parking and taxis in dense areas, as membership in a five-thousand vehicle self-driving car pool will be less expensive and more convenient. Valet parking everywhere, with a robotic valet. Lower cost of ownership from better use of capital & negligible parking costs.

about a month and a half ago
top

Are the Glory Days of Analog Engineering Over?

pupsocket Re:The world... (236 comments)

Thank you for sharing your expertise with such clarity.

about 2 months ago
top

Are the Glory Days of Analog Engineering Over?

pupsocket Re:The world... (236 comments)

Analog is the accepted spelling in the computer industry.

Even worse, analogue is a model of the real. The real and continuous world is not an analogue of binary logic. An analogue is a figurative model of the real, something analogous to something else. Among the binary, however, logic is primary and real is analog. So let's preserve the proper spelling for the proper use and cede the streamlined variant to the Forces of Progress.

These travesties may be quite upsetting, but even the word "quite" once meant "hardly at all." It was used facetiously so often that came to mean "very".

about 3 months ago

Submissions

top

NSA Declares War on President

pupsocket pupsocket writes  |  about 10 months ago

pupsocket (2853647) writes "U. S. citizens can stop pretending that their secret agencies exist to provide deniability to the President. Yesterday the German newspaper of record, Frankfurter Allgemeine, reported that the President told German Chancellor Merkel that he would have stopped the tap on her phone had he known about it. Today, another German paper, Bild am Sonntag, quoted U. S. Intelligence sources that the President had been briefed in 2010. This violation of secrecy should end the myth that the White House tells the secret agencies what they can and cannot do. Sounds like blackmail, the endgame."
Link to Original Source
top

House GOP Asks McAfee to Critique HealthCare.Gov -- But Stay Away from Them

pupsocket pupsocket writes  |  about 10 months ago

pupsocket (2853647) writes "The House Energy and Commerce Committee invited John McAfee to guide them in investigating the flaws of the new government online facility for obtaining health insurance, HealthCare.Gov. If they were hoping for a like-minded maniac who left treasure and unsolved murders in the Caribbean to now monopolize the cameras with rants against the hopelessness of ever succeeding with ObamaCare, they must have been disappointed to discover a guy with an eye for the main chance, confident of his ability to recommend a successful rebuild. It turned out they didn't have the funds to let him report in person and therefore he decided they weren't serious and declined."
Link to Original Source

Journals

pupsocket has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>