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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

putaro Re:I'm confused... (390 comments)

"That is correct, but you should be able to see that this is an unsustainable model. Let's say Netflix continues growing by leaps and bounds and absolutely dominates as the source of traffic on the Internet, even more so than it already does. L3 gets paid more and more by Netflix for their access bandwidth while Verizon gets absolutely nothing extra but is required to carry more and more load from L3."

The only reason that L3 would get paid more would be because Netflix was fully using their connection and getting their money's worth and needed to purchase additional bandwidth. Verizon would get paid more if either the number of customers increased OR their customers maxed out their bandwidth and needed faster connections. The reason Verizon would not get paid more is because Verizon is selling an oversubscribed service but likes to pretend that they are not.

So, what's really happening here is a mismatch between business models. When you buy a "business grade" Internet connection you pay more with the assumption that you are going to pump as much data down it 7x24 as you possibly can. You get what you contracted for.

When you purchase home internet connectivity, your price/bit/sec is considerably lower because it's on an oversubscribed network. However, the carrier will never say that, merely that your bandwidth isn't guaranteed. If you do try to use it 7x24 they'll try to find some way to wriggle out of the contract they made. And that's exactly what Verizon is doing here, by throttling the bandwidth from Netflix. Suppose all the traffic wasn't coming from Netflix. Would it make any difference? Not really, because as the L3 guy pointed out, the cost of the networknetwork hop is miniscule. Where it does cost is in the haul from the peering point to the house. So anything that increases the amount of traffic from the peering point to the house will cost Verizon money.

If someone were to come up with a peer-to-peer movie streaming service that ran entirely within Verizon's network but only on home connections they'd have a cow as well. What they really want is to be paid on a per-bit basis but that's not palatable in the consumer marketplace.

about two weeks ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

putaro Re:Help me understand (390 comments)

And when you order a product from Amazon and they pay FedEx to deliver it, FedEx doesn't give you another bill when they show up at your doorstep.

There are different payment models. Home Internet access has been sold for a long time as "x bits/sec" use as much or as little as you like. Internet traffic was traditionally bursty, without long sustained transmissions so ISPs got into the habit of oversubscribing their networks and holding onto as much of the money as they can.

Netflix pays their ISP (Level 3) quite a bit a of money to provide network access. And Verizon's customers (collectively) pay Verizon quite a bit of money to provide network access. The problem is that the way Internet access is priced it's in the ISP's best interest to discourage you from using the network while promising you more and charging you more.

Per packet pricing, charged to someone, would be one solution to this problem but it's not very popular with people who have gotten used to "all you can eat". I'd certainly hate having my Internet bills jump up and down on a monthly basis.

about two weeks ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

putaro Re:I'm confused... (390 comments)

How is traffic ever going to be balanced between a last mile provider like Verizon and a backbone provider?

Historically, if my memory serves, ISPs paid backbones for access to the Internet, not the other way around. The cash flowed from ISPs to backbones because ISP customers paid for Internet access and then the ISP paid their upstream provider. Backbones didn't pay each other and set up peering arrangements because they realized it was pretty much a wash.

The way I see it, Verizon is trying to double dip. Their customers have paid them for bandwidth and a connection to other networks. Netflix has paid L3 for their internet connectivity and L3 has delivered up to the Verizon network. Verizon chooses to not provide adequate access even though their customers are the ones pulling the data from Netflix.

about two weeks ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

putaro Re:I disagree (390 comments)

Level 3 doesn't pay Comcast for bandwidth. Why should they? Comcast customers have already paid Comcast for the links to their house and they're the ones pulling data from Level 3. Level 3's customers pay Level 3 to deliver to the edge of their network. As the Level 3 post points out, the cost for Verizon to add more bandwidth between the Level 3 network and the Verizon network is minimal.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Choosing a Web Language That's Long-Lived, and Not Too Buzzy?

putaro Re:Perl (536 comments)

You know, you can write hard to read code in C as well but most C doesn't turn as hard to read as most Perl.

Unreadable code is unmaintainable code. It may not be buggy but how do you know?

about a month ago
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Massachusetts SWAT Teams Claim They're Private Corporations, Immune To Oversight

putaro Re:They shouldn't have immunity then (534 comments)

Police officers, however, cannot usually be personally sued for their actions while on the job.

about 1 month ago
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Massachusetts SWAT Teams Claim They're Private Corporations, Immune To Oversight

putaro Re:They shouldn't have immunity then (534 comments)

Right versus left is not always the spectrum to be looking at. There are people on both sides of the left/right spectrum that are for more government control and for less government control.

See the Pournelle Chart for a 2D analysis of political thought.

about a month ago
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Massachusetts SWAT Teams Claim They're Private Corporations, Immune To Oversight

putaro They shouldn't have immunity then (534 comments)

Government officials and organizations have immunity from lawsuits for the most part, however private corporations are not. I'm sure there are any number of potential lawsuits that could be brought against them. I'd say it would be fun to watch them try to dance around the subject but it's not, really. It's sickening.

about a month ago
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Amazon's Android Appstore Coming To BlackBerry

putaro The question is can they make enough money? (76 comments)

It seems like anybody can make an Android compatible phone these days so I'll assume that Blackberry has the ability to do that. Now, will they be able to sell their hardware? They have a well-established channel. However, the Android phone market is pretty competitive so the question is will they be able to sell enough and make enough profit to sustain themselves as the large company they've become?

about a month ago
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Google Engineer: We Need More Web Programming Languages

putaro Re:Desktop-Spoiled Users (Re:Why?) (309 comments)

Spoiled? You mean they've seen non-sucky applications. That's not spoiled, that's being a discerning user.

Applets and Flash both suffer from the problem of continually downloading code over the Internet, slow startup times, and then all the handicaps of running inside a browser window and running inside a sandbox.

Browsers still suck for running applications. If the browser crashes it takes all your windows with it. The "Back" button is usually there and gives inconsistent results.

Browsers suck for running applications because they're for displaying web pages, not for running interactive UI's.

about a month and a half ago
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Google Engineer: We Need More Web Programming Languages

putaro Re:Why? (309 comments)

Don't fuckin hog my cpu and demand I run a supercomputer too as an end user.

Amen! I am sick and tired of people trying to write "applications" instead of just serving up a web page that you can read.

Some sites have started going to this system where they load portions of the article as you scroll through it. Is there a benefit to me? Not that I can see. The only reason I can think of why they do it is to track what you're reading.

about a month and a half ago
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Google Engineer: We Need More Web Programming Languages

putaro Re:Why? (309 comments)

Well, you get to program in a paradigm that regular GUI programmers understand, that is an event loop type environment. You also get to program everything in ONE language (that isn't Javascript) and you don't need to manage the client/server communications.

Google uses it for some of their stuff and it works reasonably well. I wouldn't use it for implementing, say, a word processor in a browser, but for things like interactive forms it's quite reasonable.

about a month and a half ago
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Google Engineer: We Need More Web Programming Languages

putaro Re:Why? (309 comments)

Those do exist, for example Google Web Toolkit (GWT) which spits out Javascript and HTML from Java code that you write and manages the communications between the Javascript in the web page and the Java code running on the server. There are difficulties, though, because Javascript and HTML are really kind of sucky for running GUIs and it takes tweaking to get everything looking good in every browser.

Personally, I think that running complex applications inside the browser is just plain stupid but it keeps on getting pushed at us.

about a month and a half ago
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Become a Linux Kernel Hacker and Write Your Own Module

putaro Re:Umm (143 comments)

In my experience the concurrency will get you but it's also the lack of memory protection that will drive you nuts. The Linux kernel has everything running in the same address space so a bug in some dippy USB driver can crash the whole system. And that is why you shouldn't let n00bs write kernel code.

about 2 months ago
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Become a Linux Kernel Hacker and Write Your Own Module

putaro Re:Umm (143 comments)

But not every driver gets included into the kernel. I wanted to use an open source ISDN driver and it was broken because some yahoo had decided that the kernel logging macros all needed to be renamed.

I did kernel development back before Linus even started on Linux and I avoid Linux internals like the plague because they're in a constant state of flux.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Tech Customers Forced Into Supporting Each Other?

putaro Re:To be fair... (253 comments)

Two out of three of those things are not benefits for the customers.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Tech Customers Forced Into Supporting Each Other?

putaro Re:To be fair... (253 comments)

How about a publicly accessible forum where the SUPPORT STAFF answer questions?

What's wrong with peer-to-peer support? Basically the company is free-riding on the backs of its users.

about 2 months ago
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Declining LG's New Ad-friendly Privacy Policy Removes Features From Smart TVs

putaro Re:It's not a privacy policy (221 comments)

Maybe it's time for "corporate jail" - the company's operations get suspended for the time it's in "jail" but it's required to continue paying employees. That might finally start getting their attention.

about 2 months ago
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What qualifications should the 'driver' of a fully autonomous car need?

putaro Re:They need to learn to let it go (301 comments)

Automatic cars for a taxi service wouldn't have user accessible controls - unless they're a JohnnyCab!

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Journals

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"not even worth mentioning"

putaro putaro writes  |  about 11 years ago

Bastards. Idiots with spreadsheets pretending to be engineers. Who would need a repair kit for a shuttle? No, that foam strike is no problem at all. Nosiree. Trust me

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putaro putaro writes  |  about 11 years ago

OK, who was the retard who decided to map entire PARTITIONS into memory and that therefore PARTITIONS (not files, file systems!) could only be a max of 2GB under HURD? Oy vey. Yah, you betcha GNU's not Unix. Maybe some SCO code would help.

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putaro putaro writes  |  about 11 years ago

So I thought I'd try installing GNU Hurd and messing with it. "Try the Debian CD image" beckons the GNU Hurd page. My, that's nice I thought. Who needs to read the instructions page - that's what the installer is for, right? Why bother making an installer if it's not going to at least install the boot loader? And then I'm supposed to type this at the GRUB prompt:

grub> module (hd0,0)/hurd/ext2fs.static \ --multiboot-command-line=${kernel-command-line} \ --host-priv-port=${host-port} \ --device-master-port=${device-port} \ --exec-server-task=${exec-task} -T typed ${root} \ $(task-create) $(task-resume)

Ya know, I don't mind doing the extra work since it's a development system - but why go to the effort of making a CD image and an installer and not do the last two fricking steps? A kernel comment comes to mind: This was hard to write, it should be hard to understand.

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