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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

rabun_bike Sounds like Sun's Java Ring all over again... (228 comments)

This is an article from 1998. Scott McNealy liked to show off his Java ring at that time and talk about how it would be used to allow someone to walk into a hotel room and have sensors detect the person and their wishes such as music and mood lighting and it would also store your crypto keys on it. It will be interesting to see if people are read to wear tech as new devices enter the market.

http://www.javaworld.com/artic...

picture
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wi...

5 days ago
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Justified: Visual Basic Over Python For an Intro To Programming

rabun_bike Past VB and VB.NET programmer (646 comments)

I hate to admit I spent many years programming in VB and VB.NET. The first language I ever learned was BASIC (80's) and then Turbo Pascal followed by C and then C++. Later on I moved to VB.NET (I still hate C/C++ development on Windows unless using some cross platform tool), Javascript, Java, C#, and back to C/C++ and lately Python. What I have found really nice about Python as a beginner language for CS is how closely Python maps to set theory, how well it is supported across platforms, and that the syntax is precisely closer to C which is a benefit and not a detriment. I personally think Python is a great choice for intro to CS with my only issues being that Python is mostly used as a scripting language and many of the concepts of compiled languages also are important to learn and know. As for Intro to IT or just "generally intro to programming" maybe it isn't the best language. I am not certain but I still think it is far better than the quirky syntax of VB and VB.NET.

about a week ago
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Montana Lawmakers Propose 85 Mph Speed Limit On Interstates

rabun_bike Re:Montana used to have no speed limit at all... (525 comments)

After the states were able to set highway speeds Montana abolished their upper speed limit for a short time. Interestingly people started coming to Montana only to drive at extremely high rates of speed including some Germans who were test driving high performance vehicles. That caused some issues that caught Montana off guard. Later the Montana Supreme Court struck down the vague "reasonable and prudent" language when some guy from Montana protested 3 tickets he got under that law and a new speed limit was re-imposed.

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/12... https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

about 2 months ago
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The One App You Need On Your Resume If You Want a Job At Google

rabun_bike Re: matlab is not new (205 comments)

Whoops. Self correction. The developers of Wolfram Alpha developed Mathematica and not MATLAB. That's what I get for relying on my aging memory.

about 3 months ago
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The One App You Need On Your Resume If You Want a Job At Google

rabun_bike matlab is not new (205 comments)

I used Matlab extensively in upper level mathematics courses as an undergrad from 1993 to 1995. I was surprised people don't know much about it or that Wolfram Alpha comes from the same company and even accepts Matlab syntax.

about 3 months ago
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Study: Male Facial Development Evolved To Take Punches

rabun_bike Re:Sexual selection by the opposite sex. (190 comments)

As someone who has enjoyed lifting, running, cycling, and swimming their entire adult life I can saw I personally enjoy all of it because of the way it makes me feel. And each one is very different. I think those that don't get to experience that feeling are kind of missing out really.

about 8 months ago
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Study: Male Facial Development Evolved To Take Punches

rabun_bike Re:Sexual selection by the opposite sex. (190 comments)

I agree. I think that is a very complex thing to determine and put one explanation on it. Without building a good animal model, all we really can do is observe and hypothesize. We can observe things like humans have enormous (off the charts) genitalia compared with other known primates. Why we have them? That's the fun of science to ponder those questions in my opinion.
http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/12/average_penis_size_human_penises_are_huge_compared_to_other_primates.html

Just take head shape as another example. There are so many variations in sizes and shapes it is pretty astounding and they are changing all the time.
http://www.livinganthropologic...

I don't think one thing can even come close to explaining these features which was really the who purpose of my original post. The reality is most likely "all of the above."

about 8 months ago
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Study: Male Facial Development Evolved To Take Punches

rabun_bike Sexual selection by the opposite sex. (190 comments)

Sexual selection is most likely an additional element in the facial features as it has been theorized to be one of the primary driving features of some of the physical statue difference between males and females of many different species. Hence Darwin's explanation of the ornate peacock.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S...

about 8 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Fastest, Cheapest Path To a Bachelor's Degree?

rabun_bike Re:Hi... (370 comments)

Very good to hear different sides of a similar story. I think it is just such a personal experience and journey that people can complete to in many different ways.

about 10 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Fastest, Cheapest Path To a Bachelor's Degree?

rabun_bike Re:Hi... (370 comments)

Very true but you can still teach an old dog new tricks. I went back to school for the third time to get my under graduate coursework in CS out of the way so I can apply to a MS program when my youngest starts 1st grade (in about three years). I started taking CS classes in my late 30's and have 2 more courses to go and I am now in my 40's with 2 kids. What I found is that even though I have a minor in Mathematics it provided me almost no help in Discrete Math. Honestly Discrete Math taken at a large engineering university was an eye opening experience for me. The only thing that helped me was Linear Algebra and some graph theory I already knew. And it really made me angry that the US education system had shorted me so severely on what I would call classic mathematics. To catch up I put in many, many hours to do well in that class. And I did OK with with a B+. Going back to doing proofs after 20 years was a a challenge but it was not impossible. I already have a MS in Computer Information Systems but my heart is in Computer Science and so is the type of work that I do. You can take challenging courses later in life and I think it can be very rewarding. In my Data Structures class the final project was an impossible task for undergraduates. I spent hours working on the project which combined graph theory, and many different data structures and related concepts into a large final class project. I put the effort in and got a 100 on the assignment along with a single fellow classmate also in his 30's taking coursework for another masters program. We both got A+ grades in that class. The class average for that assignment was a 45 which included our two perfect scores. I then went on to take Computer Architecture and Assembler programming and had a similar experience. The undergraduate kids did pretty well on the tests and it was difficult to beat them but when it came to the projects the older students like myself could beat them hands down. We simply have many more years of experience in building things that work as well as tenacity in completing the projects to our best ability. It takes a lot of work to go back to school and complete challenging coursework but I personally have found it very rewarding.

about 10 months ago
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Paris Bans Half of All Cars On the Road

rabun_bike Florance Italy Been Doing this Since mid 90's (405 comments)

This isn't anything new except they now have to do it Paris. Florence (Firenze) Italy was doing this when I was there in 1997. It was pretty interesting because they even had high smog alerts (No Traffic Zones) that required people with certain license plates to actually pull off the road during high alerts on Sundays. This apparently has been expanded to other days of the week. Italy also banned many vehicles from inside the Florence. At the city gate you had to have a special sticker to get in with a car or moped. It was very difficult and expensive to get a sticker for a car.

http://www.expatsinitaly.com/n...

about 10 months ago
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How Do You Backup 20TB of Data?

rabun_bike Tape (983 comments)

Tape backups are the cheapest way to go as far as media and surprisingly is making a comeback due to high storage requirements. It can be expensive as far as hardware and software depending on what you buy. We backup about the same amount of data in our production environment for offsite storage. Latest tapes can hold 4 TB per tape.

about a year ago
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Satoshi Nakamoto Found? Not So Fast

rabun_bike Re:Ding dong! (182 comments)

Not the only typo in my post but thanks. I should have also said "objectively" and not "subjectively" as well as some other grammatical errors. Just the nature of unedited posts. I would love to have an editor follow me around though. That would be awesome.

about a year ago
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Satoshi Nakamoto Found? Not So Fast

rabun_bike Two Months? (182 comments)

Once people inside the publication or organization get wrapped up in these stories they can no longer think subjectively. They convince themselves they have it right and sometimes they don't but it is hard to convince yourself otherwise.

Two months is not a huge amount of time to do research for a story that no one else has come close to cracking. Just because the guy's bio sounds plausible doesn't make it so. Heck a few years ago a lawyer in the US was a partial thumbprint match on a bomb that exploded in Madrid. In the end his fingerprint matched the bomb maker's partial print and the FBI had to apologize but not before they put him through the ringer. Everyone was convinced he was the guy. They just couldn't see past the finger print match.
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5053...

Another example is Dan Rather's early career retirement due to back research on then president Bush military service. Dan just couldn't let it go and it ended his career.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_W._Bush_military_service_controversy

Another FBI example was the Atlanta Olympic bomber suspect Ricard Jewel. FBI got that one wrong as well but plowed ahead anyway.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Jewell

There are many more of these example.

about a year ago
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Comcast Turning Chicago Homes Into Xfinity Hotspots

rabun_bike Re:So what happens (253 comments)

There is only one terminating DOCSIS gateway which most likely will only support the assignment of a single IP address. So although the internal switchable network will be on a VLAN or something similar, most likely all the data traffic will traverse across the single DOCSIS gateway and hence be indistinguishable on the Internet from your own network traffic.

about a year ago
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Microsoft Rumored To Integrate Android Apps

rabun_bike Re:It worked well for OS/2 (189 comments)

It is interesting you bring up OS/2 since it was originally a joint development effort between IBM and Microsoft. It was taking a long time to get the product out of the door and Microsoft did a fast release of a less than stable version of Windows on DOS before IBM. Microsoft later released Windows NT. What first eroded OS/2 was the price tag which was about 4 times that of Windows and Microsoft OEM licensing. In reality OS/2 had some features that were far better than Windows (non NT) at the time (like flat memory, execution in protected mode, multiple DOS execution in OS/2 2.0, and high stability) but IBM being IBM couldn't put the product together into something that made economic sense. And then the developers targeted the larger install base (Windows 16 bit) and that was that. Microsoft figured out how to bundle Windows with new PCs and that was the golden ticket for them. Both OS/2 and Windows ran on PC hardware. Interestingly OS/2 was used in many important infrastructure systems like bank ATMs and train ticketing systems up until relatively recently.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O...

about a year ago
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Fracking Is Draining Water From Areas In US Suffering Major Shortages

rabun_bike Re:Context people (268 comments)

Now you are comparing fresh water and salt water in an attempt to save your argument. Unfortunate for humans on planet earth we require fresh water to live. Salt water makes up 97.5% of all water on the planet. That leaves humans and other animals only 2.5% to live on including agricultural and industrial usages.

http://www.grida.no/graphicsli...

about a year ago
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Fracking Is Draining Water From Areas In US Suffering Major Shortages

rabun_bike Re:Context people (268 comments)

For obvious reasons. They didn't want to reveal the carcinogens they are using in fracking fluid which includes a long list of zene named chemicals such as Benzene, Ethylbenzene, Toluene, Xylene, Naphthalene, as well as Formaldehyde, Methanol, Ethylene glycol, Glycol ethers, Hydrochloric acid, diesel fuel, and Sodium hydroxide. These discharges would most likely never be allowed if the clear water act could be used to sue the government to compel compliance of the gas industry. Since they are exempt they don't have to comply and can classify the composition of fracking fluid ingredients as "trade secrets."

about a year ago
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Fracking Is Draining Water From Areas In US Suffering Major Shortages

rabun_bike Re:Propaganda bullshit (268 comments)

That is true. Hydraulic fracking has been in use for many years. The main difference here is the magnitude and scale of frack drilling in the past 10 years. And as most people on slashdot know, not everything scales without consequences.

about a year ago

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