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Fermilab Begins Testing Holographic Universe Theory

rasmusbr Re:Flip the switch (233 comments)

Based on what we know about simulators, they are inherently slower and smaller in scope than the system they run on. You're never going to have a virtual machine that is more powerful than the metal that it runs on. Similarly, you're probably not going to have a simulated universe be more powerful than the universe that is hosting the simulated universe.

I don't think that is necessarily true. You just can't simulate something more powerful in real time. Maybe the simulation takes an day in the simulator's universe to "render" one second in our universe (or any other ratio, it's just an example). To the people in the simulation, everything seems "real-time" from their point of view. We have no way to know how long the hardware in the "real" universe takes to run our simulation.

I'm sure new CPU designs that are more powerful can still be simulated on older CPU designs. Again, the simulation may run a lot slower.

Yes, that would probably be the case, but the host universe would still be greater than the guest universe in some sense. The host universe would, over time, have a greater number of interactions between things than the simulation would have.

yesterday
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Fermilab Begins Testing Holographic Universe Theory

rasmusbr Re:Flip the switch (233 comments)

Well, these sort of arguments depends on the assumption that we exist as so-called observer-moments and that your current experience is a randomly selected observer-moment out of all the observer-moments in all of time and space in all of the universes in the cosmos. This may be total BS, but several real philosophers seem to take it seriously.

yesterday
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Fermilab Begins Testing Holographic Universe Theory

rasmusbr Re:Flip the switch (233 comments)

When people say "maybe we're living in a simulation" they mean a simulation created by sentient beings. If we live in a simulation then the host universe has sentient beings in it by definition. So that's a given.

yesterday
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Fermilab Begins Testing Holographic Universe Theory

rasmusbr Re:Flip the switch (233 comments)

If it is a simulation you could argue that it is almost certainly optimized for sentient beings.

Based on what we know about simulators, they are inherently slower and smaller in scope than the system they run on. You're never going to have a virtual machine that is more powerful than the metal that it runs on. Similarly, you're probably not going to have a simulated universe be more powerful than the universe that is hosting the simulated universe.

Think about it this way: if you're going to build models of 2x4 Lego bricks using 2x4 Lego bricks, the models will be much fewer in number than the actual Lego bricks. If you find yourself being a Lego brick, odds are you are an actual Lego brick and not a model Lego brick.

Also, tightly packed systems where the components of the systems are small and close to one another in space are faster than systems where the components are large and far from one another in space, because communication happens at the speed of light, which is constant (as far as we know).

On the other hand, if we build a model that focuses on modelling one particular thing and neglects a bunch of other stuff then the probabilities change. Perhaps we live in a simulator hosted by a much larger universe where there is virtually no life except for the being that built the simulator, whereas our simulation is optimized to be relatively packed with life.

yesterday
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$75K Prosthetic Arm Is Bricked When Paired iPod Is Stolen

rasmusbr Re:If true, it is no longer the case with new devi (192 comments)

Apple removed the ability for iOS apps to read the iPhone's / iPad's / iPod's device id with iOS 7, which means any software that relied on that would no longer work.

2 days ago
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Is Dong Nguyen Trolling Gamers With "Swing Copters"?

rasmusbr Re:This doesn't compute...or does it (112 comments)

The only real counter to something like that is to create a game that's complicated enough that reproducing the game mechanics that make it popular takes long enough that the clones don't come out in time to bite into the profit during the critical first week/month.

Or in other words: make a product with actual lasting value. Oh, the horror!

2 days ago
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Mangalyaan Gets Ready To Enter Mars Orbit

rasmusbr Re:It's only ahead of Siding Spring by a month (66 comments)

Another way to look at it is that the close encounter between a comet and Mars is perhaps a once in a century opportunity to learn about how material from the comet interacts with Mars and its atmosphere, so the satellites in orbit around Mars should mainly be looking down at the effects on Mars.

Spacecraft-comet encounters can be had a lot more frequently than spacecraft-planet-comet encounters.

3 days ago
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Anomaly Triggers Self-Destruct For SpaceX Falcon 9 Test Flight

rasmusbr Re:Exactly! (113 comments)

This really moves SpaceX up in my estimation as well. Until now, I pictured private space flight as focusing only on making profits, not sacrificing dollars in order to protect people around them. Maybe the privatization of space flight has a future after all!

Uhhh, yeah, let me know how well the PR monkey handles explaining to the general public that your loved ones aboard their dream vacation to space were blown up on purpose as a safety measure.

Good luck with that shit.

Manned capsules must have an emergency escape system.

Basically what would happen is explosive bolts would detach the capsule from the rocket and the capsule would fly away under its own power until it's far enough away from the rocket. Then the rocket would self destruct and the capsule would come down to a safe-ish landing either under parachutes or under its own power.

This is nothing new, NASA had this in the 1960's, the Russians evidently had it in the 1980's. Also the Kerbals, apparently.

4 days ago
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Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

rasmusbr Re:kernel does crash on desktop (723 comments)

Swap is not optional if you're going to use leaky software (like for instance browse the web) on a linux machine for long periods of time without rebooting. Firefox or Chrome can easily grow to 4 or 8 gigs over time if you don't have a swap partition. If you have 16+ gigs of RAM on your machine you might not need swap at this time, but as web sites become ever more bloated you will need to upgrade to more RAM or get a swap partition or swap file.

about a week ago
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Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

rasmusbr Re:kernel does crash on desktop (723 comments)

That should read smaller than 2GB. 4 gigs is usually a good size.

about a week ago
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Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

rasmusbr Re:kernel does crash on desktop (723 comments)

While Linux kernel is solid on servers for whatever reason on desktop it always was crashing and/or required occasional reboots. Flashdisks plugging/unplugging creates allocated un-unmountable devices. Desktop machines just randomly reboot. Screen occasionally goes black or garbage forever (it may be X bug). Keyboard becomes unresponsible. OOM problems where the system locks up or some fundamental process gets killed. etc.

Do you have a swap partition and is it reasonably large? A lot of strange stuff can happen if you decide you don't need a swap partition (think again), or if you use a really small swap partition, i.e. 2GB.

about a week ago
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Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

rasmusbr Re:Linux could own the desktop... (723 comments)

If that's the case, then why is it that every single time I find out about some interesting software I have to jump through all sorts of hoops to get a reasonably up to date version of that software?

This is on the latest version of Ubuntu.

about a week ago
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Your Phone Can Be Snooped On Using Its Gyroscope

rasmusbr Re:So? (96 comments)

Permissions on Android are a bit more rudimentary, so it would be simple to make a background process that just sits and quietly listens to the gyro. You would need to ask for the permission to keep the device awake in order to keep the CPU and sensor chip alive and (in order for it to be practical) the permission to start on boot.

about a week ago
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Your Phone Can Be Snooped On Using Its Gyroscope

rasmusbr Re:So? (96 comments)

Basically an app can ask for permissions for the gyro only (if it even needs to) and be recording conversation.

Yeah, that's the thing. You don't need permissions for the gyro on Android and iOS, so any and all of the apps that you have on your phone or tablet could be using the gyro and you wouldn't know, except for an anomalous battery drain.

about a week ago
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Wheel Damage Adding Up Quickly For Mars Rover Curiosity

rasmusbr Re:Someone with no brain is running NASA (162 comments)

TFA says adding 1 mm of aluminium to the wheels would have added too much weight to the wheels. Silicon rubber is about half as dense as aluminium, so a couple of millimeters of that would also have been too heavy.

There are probably lots of other ways to improve durability, like for instance by making the chevrons on the wheels slightly less pointy.

about a week ago
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Scientists Find Traces of Sea Plankton On ISS Surface

rasmusbr Re:This actually makes perfect sense. (117 comments)

I would expect it's more likely that it picked the stuff up during launch. Water vapor in the air at low altitudes?

Yeah, or perhaps more likely: water droplets carried by the wind inside the bay where they loaded the space station module into the shuttle.

about a week ago
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Apple's App Store Needs a Radical Revamp; How Would You Go About It?

rasmusbr Re:How to fix ALL the app stores... (249 comments)

1. That seems overly drastic. The flashlight apps are useful and kids love those silly apps. The solution might be to add more categories and force apps into the correct category.
2. What? No, that would be horrible. The definition of a smartphone used to be a phone that lets you replace some of its stock apps with custom apps.
3. That is actually a great idea.
4. That would kill something like 95% of the serious app businesses.
5. Yes, again that is a good idea.
6. This might be necessary in order to comply with regulation in many countries, but it would not be very useful in practice in most cases. It would lead to things like...

if timeSinceInstall > 30 min :
disable niceMode
enable normalMode
start asking for more money
end if

about two weeks ago
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Berlin Bans Car Service Uber

rasmusbr Very well, then (341 comments)

It says in their Berlin page, under fine print: "Uber is not a transportation provider." https://www.uber.com/cities/be...

If they're not a transportation provider then I don't see why banning them from providing transport would be a problem, since that's supposedly not what they're doing.

about two weeks ago
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Solid State Drives Break the 50 Cents Per GiB Barrier, OCZ ARC 100 Launched

rasmusbr Re:Cheaper drives (183 comments)

I got a 256GB MX100. I haven't done any testing, but the day to day experience is that it's good enough for everyday use. Small apps take about a second to launch and become responsive.

about two weeks ago
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Idiot Leaves Driver's Seat In Self-Driving Infiniti, On the Highway

rasmusbr Re:Huh? (406 comments)

You'd think these cars would have a sensor in the seat to detect if there's a driver or not.
I mean, newish cars already have them in the passenger seat to enable/disable the passenger side air bags.

They would need something better than that, like a camera that monitors the eyes of the driver and correlates the eye movements with the road and the traffic to determine if the driver is actively aware of the situation.

One solution might be to have cars that are always in one of two modes:

Mode 1: Fully autonomous.
Mode 2: Fully manual. A warning signal will sound if the driver does something that the computer wouldn't do, or fails to do something that the computer would do. The computer may decide to switch to mode 1 if it determines that the driver is asleep or drunk.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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SpaceX Posts Damaged Video Of Falcon 9 First Stage Splashdown

rasmusbr rasmusbr writes  |  about 4 months ago

rasmusbr (2186518) writes "SpaceX has posted video from a camera mounted on the Falcon 9 rocket's first stage as the rocket stage attempted a soft splashdown on the ocean surface on April 18, after launching a resupply mission to the International Space Station. The powered splashdown was a test of the Falcon 9 first stage's ability to decelerate and land after launch, a crucial step toward a reusable first stage.

The video bitstream is damaged and SpaceX has spent a week trying to repair it. They now turn to the public for help."

Link to Original Source

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