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Economists Say Newest AI Technology Destroys More Jobs Than It Creates

rasmusbr Re:AI + organisations will be the real problem (646 comments)

If you're worried about what'll happen to driving, look at what happened to horseback riding and sailing.

If self-driving cars become a reality, car driving enthusiasts will probably settle down in an area where there is at least one good racetrack that they can frequent and racetracks will probably have garage spaces for rent, much like marinas have dock spaces for rent. So you won't have to drive your race car to your regular race track.

Many towns will have a historic car day, say on a Saturday, when certain streets will be open to traffic with manually driven cars, with curious onlookers lining the streets to get a glimpse of the old machines.

2 days ago
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Economists Say Newest AI Technology Destroys More Jobs Than It Creates

rasmusbr Re:Does the job still get done? (646 comments)

But humans have a long history of having to work in order to get food, clothes, shelter and other essentials. We have at least a cultural instinct, possibly a genetic instinct, to think that people who work a lot deserve to have a lot of possessions and status, while people who work a little or don't work at all deserve nothing. It's not going to be easy to relearn that instinct.

Of course, there are already large swaths of people who do little to no useful work and have high social status...

Maybe the short-term solution to the problem is for more people to become politicians and lawyers, the former creating jobs for the latter by imposing more and more laws.

2 days ago
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Google Suggests Separating Students With 'Some CS Knowledge' From Novices

rasmusbr Yeah, let's lower the standards (307 comments)

I had some programming background when I took CS101. I found that being good at writing spaghetti code (or even simple OO code) that works is not something that puts you ahead of other students in a computer science course, and that you actually have to learn the course material in order to pass. Who would have guessed!

If people like me don't have to take CS101 then we're slowly but surely going to end up with a community of programmers/engineers who don't have a firm enough grasp of basic concepts in computer science, and they'll be worse at their jobs for it.

A better solution is to have after-school workshops for high school kids where they can prepare for a degree in CS. They way it ought to work is that math teachers in poor neighborhoods should keep and eye out for kids who are talented at math and recommend them for the CS workshops.

Now, I imagine this sort of discrete sorting of students will probably get you sued in the US, but it would work in most other countries.

5 days ago
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Airbus Attacked By French Lawmaker For Talking To SpaceX

rasmusbr Re:This is not news (166 comments)

The Ariane 6 sounds like it would entail a lot of pointless duplication of work that SpaceX has already done. Skylon should be funded, but there is no guarantee that it'll work.

I think the best way to get the European space launch industry back on track might be to take a hint from how the Chinese go about things and buy something like 100 Falcon 9 launches at above the normal going rate, with a special requirement that the rockets must be built in Europe.

Then SpaceX could either turn down this giant deal that would give them financial security for years, or they could accept it and build a factory somewhere in Europe, which would then cause knowledge and technology to seep out into the European space industry.

5 days ago
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Peru Indignant After Greenpeace Damages Ancient Nazca Site

rasmusbr Re:What the hell is wrong with Millennials?! (465 comments)

What the hell is wrong with Millennials?!

Same goddamned thing that's "wrong" with every other generation ever. Greed, selfishness, etc. The difference in outcomes stems from things like cheap air travel, which makes it possible for local idiots to literally go global. I bet these Greenpeace activist could have never afforded to fly to Peru in say 1964.

Of course, the boomers and their Soviet counterparts came pretty close to inadvertently wiping out civilization during Able Archer, which no other generation has managed to repeat since then.

about a week ago
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Swedish Police Raid the Pirate Bay Again

rasmusbr Re:Free Enterprise (184 comments)

Yeah...

First they came for TPB, but you didn't say anything because you weren't running a piracy torrent tracker, then they came for, uh, TPB again. And yeah, next they'll probably raid Spotify.

about two weeks ago
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Samsung SSD 850 EVO 32-Layer 3D V-NAND-Based SSD Tested

rasmusbr Re:.50 WHAT? (127 comments)

Yeah, I got a similar price on a 256GB drive back in June/July.

about two weeks ago
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Samsung SSD 850 EVO 32-Layer 3D V-NAND-Based SSD Tested

rasmusbr Re:.50 WHAT? (127 comments)

I'm more irritated by the bringing price down-part of that sentence. SSD:s are already about $0.55 per GiB and have been at that price point for several months.

I hope the $0.55 price will turn out to be more like $.40 once production is in full swing.

about two weeks ago
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In North Korea, Hackers Are a Handpicked, Pampered Elite

rasmusbr Re:Mostly done. Mostly. (102 comments)

Nah. It's in your interest to stay as much off the radar of the Dear Leader and his buddies radar as possible. The second one of them perceives you as a threat you and your family is up for disappearance.

They will go to great lengths to treat famous people well, because you can't disappear those discretely. Random nerds, not so much. One of these elite hackers will be killed the second the leaders perceive that person as a threat.

about two weeks ago
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Google Confirms That It's Designing Kid-Friendly Versions of Its Services

rasmusbr Re:Probably SJW infested (52 comments)

Maybe there'll be a conservative version too...

Google Search: gay marriage
Did you mean "may marriage"?

Google Search: abortion
Did you mean "adoption"?

Google Search: the big bang
Showing results for "Genesis 1":

about two weeks ago
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Which Programming Language Pays the Best? Probably Python

rasmusbr Re:Should I learn Imperial or Metric for max $$$? (277 comments)

I hear that most fields use metric, but some really high-paying ones like petroleum engineering use imperial units. Should I focus my studies on imperial units if I want to make more money?

Whether you use metric or Imperial measurements is really a minor side issue.

The important thing is that you use a good steel ruler and compasses. None of that plastic crap.

about two weeks ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

rasmusbr Re:Really? (196 comments)

Actually, what I think have the "suits" excited is the ability to things like identify what's in your refrigerator at any given time so they can send targeted ads to your (tracked) mobile device to buy crap you don't want while you're buying stuff you need. And to monitor your video/audio consumption habits for similar reasons (seamless ad insertion, product placements, etc., etc.).

When anything and everything can send data to the Internet, who do you think will be receiving such data?

That is mainly a problem if you sign up to get something for free. I don't expect that a company that makes 50 bucks net profit off of a fridge is going to risk their reputation in order to make a tiny bit more money by selling my data.

I'm more worried that the NSA would hack into an accelerometer intended to detect vibrations of the compressor and use it as a microphone to spy on my kitchen.

about two weeks ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

rasmusbr Re:Really? (196 comments)

When I hear "Internet of Things", I think, "Twitter Enabled Refrigerator"

It's that too, but that's not what the (more serious) suits are excited about. The suits are typically excited about increasing profits for stuff that already exists, or about new business to business inventions.

Imagine for instance connecting everything in a factory in such a way that you can sit at a screen in a control room and detect or predict problems ahead of time. You could also have a risk function that quantifies risk. Sensors might for instance detect weak but unusual vibrations in a machine. Other sensors might detect that you only have spares in stock for one repair of that machine. The risk function has a model of how the factory works and the model shows that the machine is vital and that production will be significantly reduced if it breaks down, which means that you're looking at a fairly high economic risk. The system could then suggest potential fixes, like stocking up on more spares, or running the machine more slowly until the next scheduled maintenance.

I think this sort of setup is already in place in many factories, but it will get more common and more advanced in the future.

about two weeks ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

rasmusbr Re:Really? (196 comments)

Yeah and there were virtual machines talking to other virtual machines and abstracting away resources long before anyone thought of the word "cloud".

Simple shorthands like "cloud" or "internet of things" are needed because the suit-wearing people who decide where money gets allocated often prefer fuzzy thinking.

about two weeks ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

rasmusbr Re:Really? (196 comments)

You don't get it. IoT is a shorthand for the idea of having lots of networked sensors and actuators. In layman's terms: setups such as self-driving cars that warn each other about road hazards.

If this is the shape of things to come then there will obviously will be plenty of work for security experts.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: IT Career Path After 35?

rasmusbr Re:I think you missed the point ... (376 comments)

We have to distinguish between the onset of mental illness and the prevalence. The onset is often between age 0-35. Look here for stats on schizophrenia http://bjp.rcpsych.org/content/202/s54/s5.full Also note the comments about depression and anxiety. If you haven't had these before age 35 you're not likely to get them before retirement age.

I'm surprised to see the suicide figures, that the onset is basically constant with age. I guess I've been getting information about the <i>relative</i> risk compared to other causes of death.

The average age of onset of alcohol dependence is 22.5 http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jul2007/niaaa-02.htm Look at page 11 of this paper for age of first use for "other drugs" (as in not alcohol, cannabis) http://www.qucosa.de/fileadmin/data/qucosa/documents/11009/646_PP.pdf There does look to be a small peak in the 45+ bracket too. Medicine / opiate abuse, I'm guessing.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: IT Career Path After 35?

rasmusbr Re:I think you missed the point ... (376 comments)

On the other hand, younger people are more likely to have a baby, develop a debilitating mental illness, develop a debilitating substance addiction, commit suicide, or die in a violent accident. All of which will drastically impact their ability to contribute professionally.

Employers take that into account too.

about three weeks ago
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The Driverless Future: Buses, Not Taxis

rasmusbr Re:Eliminating the bus driver is Pareto-stupid (257 comments)

Perhaps if the bus driver makes minimum wage. But then, would you want to be driven by someone who makes minimum wage?

Subways are easy to automate, it's been done in countless cities, but there you have an average of 100-200 passengers per driver which really does make it pretty pointless to eliminate the driver.

about three weeks ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

rasmusbr Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (215 comments)

Most of Joe Six Pack's data is going straight to his various cloud accounts, which he expects to be cheap (if not free). This means that Google and Amazon need the price per unit of storage to go down, if they want to keep their customers.

The limiting latency here is the > 50 ms latency to the servers and the limiting transfer speed is the 100 Mb/s or so offered by the ISP that Joe uses. Regular old HDD:s will do fine for the storage in that situation. The database that catalogs Joe's collection of "home movies" will probably be stored in RAM most of the time, but SSD:s do have their place here as well, of course.

This is not exactly a niche case btw.

about three weeks ago
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Is Ruby On Rails Losing Steam?

rasmusbr Re:Python (291 comments)

Nah, real programmers just wire analog components together until they get the behavior that they need.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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SpaceX Posts Damaged Video Of Falcon 9 First Stage Splashdown

rasmusbr rasmusbr writes  |  about 8 months ago

rasmusbr (2186518) writes "SpaceX has posted video from a camera mounted on the Falcon 9 rocket's first stage as the rocket stage attempted a soft splashdown on the ocean surface on April 18, after launching a resupply mission to the International Space Station. The powered splashdown was a test of the Falcon 9 first stage's ability to decelerate and land after launch, a crucial step toward a reusable first stage.

The video bitstream is damaged and SpaceX has spent a week trying to repair it. They now turn to the public for help."

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