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The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

rastos1 Re:Have Both (567 comments)

even today fucking NOBODY gets multi-monitor working right. Not nVidia, not AMD, not Microsoft, not Apple, and not Linux.

Can you be a bit more vague, please?

about two weeks ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

rastos1 Re:Of course... (698 comments)

Piano Media does this: https://www.pianomedia.com/pre...

I think that I've watched this developing from the beginning. Some sites implemented it and keep using it. Some implemented it and then gave up. Some took the idea and implemented their own version. Some people just moved elsewhere. Some people keep bitching about it (which may indicate a success). It works better if you have one major media outlet and it locks news about local events in a small country. For anything global there is enough of independent sources.

about two weeks ago
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Do you worry about the singularity?

rastos1 Re:What brought this on? (181 comments)

Should I be somehow worried because f(x)=1/x is not defined for x=0 ??

I guess, I'll leave this to Betteridge's law.

about three weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

rastos1 Re:product differentiation (446 comments)

I thought those will be the ones that will be regulated out of the market.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

rastos1 Re:In Finland (516 comments)

The parent post should not have mentioned earthquake. For earthquake prone zone you want wooden houses because they are more flexible. But I don't often see earthquake reports from US. On the other hand I see tornado reports from US several times a year. The houses are turned into a pile of debris every single time. Also the victims don't usually wander around saying - "Ah, it's cheap to re-build a wooden house". More likely they say "I've lost everything; I can't afford to build a new house". I don't say that a concrete/brick building will not suffer any damage. But surely it will be in better shape compared to a wooden house.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Getting Around Terrible Geolocation?

rastos1 Re:Geolocation needs to die (100 comments)

If the complaint is about the location provided by the browser itself, then: Firefox: about:config - > geo.enabled - user set - boolean - false

Been that way since FF started to support geolocation.

about a month ago
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Suspected Ebola carriers in the U.S. ...

rastos1 Re:How about... (349 comments)

Each Ebola outbreak is a bit different. The current one does not have decades of scientific studies. It can also evolve and mutate in short time.

That said, I don't claim that Ebola is contagious before the symptoms are shown. I'm claiming that a dangerous thing does not stop being dangerous just because it is possible to handle it safely. An infected person may not know whether it has raised body temperature because it was exercising, got a cold, ate something stale or shook hands with someone at the airport. Symptoms are not discrete. Person may just not notice that something is wrong with them or may ascribe that to a different reason ...

about a month and a half ago
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Suspected Ebola carriers in the U.S. ...

rastos1 Re:How about... (349 comments)

If they aren't symptomatic they aren't contagious, period.

And carrying a flask of nitroglycerin with you is perfectly safe providing you handle it carefully. Sure thing.

about 1 month ago
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Boo! The House Majority PAC Is Watching You

rastos1 Re:Here's why (468 comments)

Voters worry about irrelevant issues like

Or the NSA's mass surveillance, the TSA, the Patriot Act, DUI checkpoints, free speech zones, and the countless other things our government does that violates the constitution.

True on slasdhot. Not the case anywhere else as far as I can tell. If I asked 100 in a shopping center whether they are care about having their internet surfing monitored, text messages monitored, phone calls monitored - I would not find one person that cares. Try convincing a BFU to start using encryption in e-mail. Good l luck. All you get is a blank stare (or they report you to authorities). Do you think anybody stops and thinks about containers for bottles at airport security check? Nobody does. Claim "it's for the children" or "it helps to fight terrorism" and you get a free pass with anything. Absolutely anything. Gosh, don't you see that everywhere?

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

rastos1 Re:VERY POSITIVE: Systemd is well-modularized (928 comments)

Systemd is modular: ...

Consisting of multiple binaries/libraries is not sufficient to call it modular. Not in my book anyway. What are the options to replace a specific "module" with a different implementation?

about 2 months ago
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France Investigating Mysterious Drone Activity Over 7 Nuclear Power Plant Sites

rastos1 Re:Unless the plant is surrounded in a glass dome. (128 comments)

Rather then carrying explosives I would expect that the drones perform reconnaissance. They are perfect for that.

about 2 months ago
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Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

rastos1 Re:Are you sure? (863 comments)

To properly quote TFA:

In discussions around the Web in the past few months, I've seen who run Linux on their laptops and maybe a VPS or home server.

- there is a link on words "an overwhelming level of support of systemd from Linux users" - and that prompted me to click on that link (in clear violation of /. codex) because I was hoping to see who are these people that overwhelmingly support systemd? (apart from Lennart himself, that is).

All I got was a blog by Paul Venezia claiming that there is "an overwhelming level of support of systemd from Linux users". The links proving that claim are suspiciously missing. The blog itself seem to be be more on the skeptical side too.

So unless I see an overwhelming level of support of systemd from someone that matters and someone who knows what he talks about, then I'm not inclined to take that statement at face value.

about 2 months ago
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Rite Aid and CVS Block Apple Pay and Google Wallet

rastos1 Re:Good luck with that. (558 comments)

Bottom line, unless you have very poor impulse control, not having a credit card is a poor financial decision.

You are assuming that whole world is equally fucked up. (It is fucked up everywhere, but in different ways).

1)Debit cards don't build credit history. This makes it hard to get a car or house loan at good rates.

The rates here are in all time lows (we talk about 2-3% for a house loan). Even if they are not, the ability to pay debts is evaluated here based on other things - such as "are you employed?", "how high is your income?", "how high are your expenses?", "do you have family?", "do you have a guarantor?", "can you provide any collateral?"

2)Credit cards have 0% interest if you pay at the end of the month every month.

The "if" is what bothers me. The bank basically sits there and waits until you make a mistake or run (even temporarily) into troubles where you can't meet the obligations. Then it makes you pay through the nose.

about 2 months ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re: Some Sense Restored? (522 comments)

What services does your daemon provide?

?? Does it matter? It answers queries received over the network.

Will it rebind to network interfaces if they change?

Hmm. Can you be more specific? I have problem coming up with scenario where replacing of NIC or changing of MAC/IP address could be handled transparently to the clients.

Does it need to write to disk?

Yes.

Does it need syslog to do logging output?

Does it matter? The typical configuration is to use direct logging to file. Without syslog. On Linux syslog may be used to log startup/shutdown of the daemon. Most likely using logger(1). On other platforms some native solution would be used.

If it crashes, should someone be notified? How? When? How often? Who?

If it crashes, people will notice because they don't get a service the daemon is providing. Immediately. They will notify the administrator and require the service to be restored. The administrator will capture the current logs and storage for investigation and restart the service. For HA systems, there will be failover system.

about 2 months ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re:Some Sense Restored? (522 comments)

So as long as I can disable dependency checking, I can avoid systemd altogether?

about 2 months ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re:Some Sense Restored? (522 comments)

You start an executable ... What do I need to do to "support an init system"?

[Guessing] Tell it how to start an executable?

That is a solved problem and does not need a new solution of the size of systemd.

about 2 months ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re:Some Sense Restored? (522 comments)

The problem with supporting multiple init systems is that each package that provides a daemon needs to support all of them.

The idea that "a daemon needs to support an init system" somehow does not make sense to me. But I'm ready to improve myself and learn. So, please, enlighten me:

Let's say I have a daemon that implements a network server. You start an executable, it reads a config file, opens a socket, listens for connections on some TCP port, reads a command from the socket, sends a reply. It can be shut down with a specific command received via socket connection or perhaps by sending a SIGTERM.

What do I need to do to "support an init system"?

about 2 months ago
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Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

rastos1 Re:I installed it (147 comments)

I tried to install that too. And then I tried to install a piece of software that takes over 2GB of disk space when installed. It took at about 11 minutes to install. And then I found out that it takes 7 minutes with Windows defender is turned off.

about 2 months ago
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Windows Flaw Allowed Hackers To Spy On NATO, Ukraine, Others

rastos1 One way street? (97 comments)

... a bug in Microsoft's Windows operating system has allowed hackers located in Russia to spy on computers used by NATO, Ukraine, the European Union, and others

Did the bug somehow prevent NATO, Ukraine, EU and others from spying on Russia?

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Another hint for Kryptos

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 1 month ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Four years ago Jim Sanborn, the sculptor who created the wavy metal pane called Kryptos that sits in front of the CIA in Langley revealed a clue for breaking the last remaining part of the encrypted message on Kryptos. The clue was: BERLIN.

But the puzzle resisted all all decryption efforts and is still unsolved.

To honor the 25th anniversary of the Wall’s demise and the artist’s 69th birthday this year, Sanborn has decided to reveal a new clue to help solve his iconic and enigmatic artwork. It’s only the second hint he’s released since the sculpture was unveiled in 1990 and may finally help unlock the fourth and final section of the encrypted sculpture, which frustrated sleuths have been struggling to crack for more than two decades. The next word in the sequence is: “clock”."
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Intel processors fails at math. Again.

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 2 months ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "In a recent blog, software developer Bruce Dawson pointed out some issues with the way the FSIN instruction is described in the “Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual.”, noting that the result of FSIN can be very inaccurate in some cases, if compared to the exact mathematical value of the sine function.

Bruce Dawson says: I was shocked when I discovered this. Both the fsin instruction and Intel’s documentation are hugely inaccurate, and the inaccurate documentation has led to poor decisions being made. ... Intel has known for years that these instructions are not as accurate as promised. They are now making updates to their documentation. Updating the instruction is not a realistic option.

Intel processors had a problem with math in past"
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UK legalises music, film and e-book back-ups

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 3 months ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "A law has come into effect that permits UK citizens to make copies of CDs, MP3s, DVDs, Blu-rays and e-books. Consumers are allowed to keep the duplicates on local storage or in the cloud.
While it is legal to make back-ups for personal use, it remains an offence to share the data with friends or family. Users are not allowed to make recordings of streamed music or video from Spotify and Netflix, even if they subscribe to the services.
Thirteen years after iTunes launched, it is now legal to use it to rip CDs in the UK."

Link to Original Source
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5 years old bug in Linux kernel fixed

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 7 months ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Ars Technica takes a look at serious bug in the Linux kernel that was introduced in 2009. "The memory-corruption vulnerability, which was introduced in version 2.6.31-rc3, released no later than 2009, allows unprivileged users to crash or execute malicious code on vulnerable systems, according to the notes accompanying proof-of-concept code available here. The flaw resides in the n_tty_write function controlling the Linux pseudo tty device." This flaw has been identified as CVE-2014-0196."
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It's lights out for the National Security Agency

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 10 months ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "State lawmakers in Maryland have filed emergency status legislation that seeks to cut the NSA’s Ft. Meade headquarters off from all material support stemming from the state. House Bill 1074 (HB1074) would ban the NSA facility from all public state utilities, ban the use of NSA collected evidence in court, ban universities from partnering with the NSA and ban all political subdivisions from assisting the NSA from within the state. Any state entity, employee or contractor refusing to comply with the law would be immediately fired and banned from all future contracts within the state."
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Solar eruption to reach Earth within three days

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "The solar eruption, called a coronal mass ejection, occurred yesterday at 1:24 a.m. EDT (0524 GMT) and sent charged particles streaking outward at 380 miles per second. That's just over 1.3 million mph (2.2 million km/h). The solar fallout from the sun storm is expected to reach Earth within the next three days. Interestingly an unnamed icy comet from the outer solar system dove into the sun and disintegrated nearly a the same time."
Link to Original Source
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Don't worry, NSA says—we only "touch" 1.6% of daily global Internet traffi

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "On the same day that President Barack Obama spoke to the press about possible surveillance reforms—and released a related white paper on the subject—the National Security Agency came out with its own rare, publicly-released, seven-page document (PDF): "In its foreign intelligence mission, NSA touches about 1.6% of 1826 PB of information that the Internet carries per day"."
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Bolivia says Morales' plane diverted, apparently over Snowden

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Bolivia president Evo Morales' plane was forced to land in Austria on Tuesday after France and Portugal refused air permits, apparently because they suspected it was carrying Edward Snowden, the former U.S. spy agency contractor wanted by Washington on espionage charges. Bolivian Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca told reporters that Portugal and France had abruptly canceled the air permits, forcing the unscheduled Vienna stopover as Morales was returning on a Bolivian government plane from Russia."
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Egyptian Navy arrests scuba divers trying to cut underwater Internet cable

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Egypt's naval forces captured three scuba divers who were trying to cut an undersea Internet cable in the Mediterranean on Wednesday, a military spokesman said. Telecommunications executives meanwhile blamed a weeklong Internet slowdown on damage caused to another cable by a ship."
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US judge blocks indefinite detention of Americans

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "A US federal judge has temporarily blocked a section of the controversial National Defense Authorization Act that allows for the indefinite military detention of US citizens. In a 68-page ruling, US District Judge Katherine Forrest agreed on Wednesday that the statute failed to “pass constitutional muster” because its language could be interpreted quite broadly and eventually be used to suppress political dissent."
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Firefox devs mull dumping Java to stop BEAST attac

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "In a demonstration last Friday, it took less than two minutes for researchers Thai Duong and Juliano Rizzo to wield the exploit to recover an encrypted authentication cookie used to access a PayPal user account. The researchers settled on a Java applet as their means to bypass SOP, leading Firefox developers to discuss blocking the framework in a future version of the browser.
“I recommend that we blocklist all versions of the Java Plugin,” Firefox developer Brian Smith wrote on Tuesday in a discussion on Mozilla's online bug forum. “My understanding is that Oracle may or may not be aware of the details of the same-origin exploit. As of now, we have no ETA for a fix for the Java plugin.”"

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Going supernova

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "If you're the owner of a decent pair of binoculars train them on the handle of The Plough or Big Dipper a little after twilight tonight. The result of a massive explosion some 21 million light years away in the Pinwheel Galaxy M101, the nearest supernova of its type to be discovered for 40 years should be at its brightest tonight."
Link to Original Source
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Nuclear plant in your backyard?

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Inspired by http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/11/07/31/211251/Volunteer-Towns-Sought-For-Nuclear-Waste
What is the acceptable distance (in miles) of nearest nuclear waste storage site from your house?
0 — it could be in my mom's basement if I wasn't living there
1-20 — I have no problem with nuclear waste
20-100 — just keep it out of sight
101- 1000 didn't you hear this stuff DANGEROUS?"
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How bin Laden emailed without being detected

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Holed up in his walled compound in northeast Pakistan with no phone or Internet capabilities, bin Laden would type a message on his computer without an Internet connection, then save it using a thumb-sized flash drive. He then passed the flash drive to a trusted courier, who would head for a distant Internet cafe.

At that location, the courier would plug the memory drive into a computer, copy bin Laden's message into an email and send it. Reversing the process, the courier would copy any incoming email to the flash drive and return to the compound, where bin Laden would read his messages offline."

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Manning stripped of rights. And clothes.

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "For most of the past eight months, Manning has been required to sleep wearing only boxer shorts, because of his status as a detainee under "prevention of injury watch," said 1st Lt. Brian Villiard, a spokesman for the military detention facility, or "brig," in Quantico. Beginning Wednesday night, the facility commander ordered that Manning turn over his boxers, too."
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Britain has received warrant on Assange

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 4 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "BBC reports that Britain has received a European arrest warrant from Sweden for the Wikileaks' founder Julian Assange. The warrant is being processed by the Serious Organised Crime Agency and will be sent to the Metropolitan Police as he is thought to be in the London area."
Link to Original Source
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Deutche Telecom plans to offer IPv6

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "The Deutsche Telekom will provide dual stack IPv4/IPv6 connectivity for all DSL users (google translation) as of end of 2011. The users will be in addition to their IPv4 address assigned IPv6 /56 prefix. Interesting is that this prefix will be dynamic. For permanently connected users, the prefix will change rarely. Customers that have purchased fixed IPv4 address, will get an offer for stable IPv6 prefix."
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Registration required to get JDK

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "I run today across a forum message mentioning that one needs to register in order to download Java Development Kit. Indeed. Looking at the list of benefits I don't think they apply to me and the requirement makes me compelled to use the "Feedback" for the first time ever. All I ever wanted was the JDK archive and API docs in a zip. Now it looks like I will have to come up with one more fake identity when I will want to update my development environment because I got lost in the forest of privacy policy documents within a few minutes. All I could find is that cookies have expiration time less than a year. What is the slashdot crowd position on this?"
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Catch a plane, or wait for bomb squad?

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Part of Munich airport in southern Germany was shut down for several hours after a traveler's laptop set off an explosives detector. ... Officials had wanted to check the computer again but the man had left. ... A police spokesman quoted by AFP news agency cautioned that the scanner could have been set off by chemicals such as perfumes, and that the man might simply have been in a hurry to catch his plane.

I'm so glad the security of air traffic is taken care of."

Link to Original Source
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SSL renegotiation attack becomes reality

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "A Turkish grad student has devised a serious, real-world attack on Twitter that targeted a recently discovered vulnerability in the SSL protocol. The exploit by Anil Kurmus is significant because it successfully targeted the so-called SSL renegotiation bug to steal Twitter login credentials that passed through encrypted data streams. All in all, a man in the middle is able to steal the credentials of a user authenticating himself through HTTPS to a trusted website.

The attack description is available on securegoose.org"

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