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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re: Some Sense Restored? (517 comments)

What services does your daemon provide?

?? Does it matter? It answers queries received over the network.

Will it rebind to network interfaces if they change?

Hmm. Can you be more specific? I have problem coming up with scenario where replacing of NIC or changing of MAC/IP address could be handled transparently to the clients.

Does it need to write to disk?

Yes.

Does it need syslog to do logging output?

Does it matter? The typical configuration is to use direct logging to file. Without syslog. On Linux syslog may be used to log startup/shutdown of the daemon. Most likely using logger(1). On other platforms some native solution would be used.

If it crashes, should someone be notified? How? When? How often? Who?

If it crashes, people will notice because they don't get a service the daemon is providing. Immediately. They will notify the administrator and require the service to be restored. The administrator will capture the current logs and storage for investigation and restart the service. For HA systems, there will be failover system.

2 days ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re:Some Sense Restored? (517 comments)

So as long as I can disable dependency checking, I can avoid systemd altogether?

2 days ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re:Some Sense Restored? (517 comments)

You start an executable ... What do I need to do to "support an init system"?

[Guessing] Tell it how to start an executable?

That is a solved problem and does not need a new solution of the size of systemd.

2 days ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

rastos1 Re:Some Sense Restored? (517 comments)

The problem with supporting multiple init systems is that each package that provides a daemon needs to support all of them.

The idea that "a daemon needs to support an init system" somehow does not make sense to me. But I'm ready to improve myself and learn. So, please, enlighten me:

Let's say I have a daemon that implements a network server. You start an executable, it reads a config file, opens a socket, listens for connections on some TCP port, reads a command from the socket, sends a reply. It can be shut down with a specific command received via socket connection or perhaps by sending a SIGTERM.

What do I need to do to "support an init system"?

3 days ago
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Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

rastos1 Re:I installed it (138 comments)

I tried to install that too. And then I tried to install a piece of software that takes over 2GB of disk space when installed. It took at about 11 minutes to install. And then I found out that it takes 7 minutes with Windows defender is turned off.

5 days ago
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Windows Flaw Allowed Hackers To Spy On NATO, Ukraine, Others

rastos1 One way street? (97 comments)

... a bug in Microsoft's Windows operating system has allowed hackers located in Russia to spy on computers used by NATO, Ukraine, the European Union, and others

Did the bug somehow prevent NATO, Ukraine, EU and others from spying on Russia?

about a week ago
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Marriott Fined $600,000 For Jamming Guest Hotspots

rastos1 Re:Inverse Wi-fi law (278 comments)

Yet it's the expensive name-brand boutique hotels that always charge for wi-fi.

Duh. They did not become name-brand by giving things away (such as cheap rooms or free wi-fi).

about two weeks ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

rastos1 Re:I've never understood this... (981 comments)

Is their religion on such shaky grounds that it can't stand up to some critical thinking?

I live in Europe. In country that bans some forms of hate speech and stuff like denial or minimization of genocides ... I sometimes pose a similar question: is our society on such shaky grounds that we have to be afraid of these forms of speech and ban it by law? Will critical thinking not prevails? As the time passes, I'm more and more leaning to "yes, we are indeed so stupid". It's sad.

about a month ago
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I think next winter will be:

rastos1 Re:Severe (148 comments)

Be careful what you wish for. We, in more central Europe, had a very mild winter too. But if there is so much snow as there is rainfall during last 3 month (there were no 4 consecutive days without rain), then we will be buried in snow up to 2nd floor.

about a month ago
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Apple Outrages Users By Automatically Installing U2's Album On Their Devices

rastos1 Re:Whiners (610 comments)

Stop yer damn whining and delete the FREE ALBUM.

Also uninstall AdBlock and disable your spam filter, you whiner! And be happy to receive the free offers for buying V1AGRA and C1ALI5 with huge discount. If you don't like the e-mails and the pop-ups, it takes much less than 5 seconds to delete the unwanted e-mail or close the browser pop-up.

Btw, what do you suggest to do if your music collection you've built over last 15 years happens to expand ten-fold with "FREE ALBUMS" every night?

about a month ago
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Ontario Government Wants To Regulate the Internet

rastos1 Re:Government doesn't get it. (184 comments)

The US has "allies" and several levels of enemies.

Nope. They don't have allies. But they have several levels of not-enemy-at-the-moment. Also the status can change very quickly.

about a month and a half ago
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Is It Time To Split Linux Distros In Two?

rastos1 Re:Nonsense (282 comments)

You can fix and modify and init script. 99.99% of users cannot.

Of course they can. It's a matter of opening a text editor and copy-pasting some text. On the other hand as soon as the init system is taken over by systemd ...

about a month and a half ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

rastos1 Re:We really need (533 comments)

Not it isn't. There are indeed companies that used to offer 100/1 on FTTH to people that don't know any better. Of course, in the ads only the download speed is ever mentioned.

about a month and a half ago
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Two Explorers Descend Into An Active Volcano, and Live to Tell About It

rastos1 Re:They descended (66 comments)

1:38 and possibly 2:00. On the other hand 2:20 was obviously "improved" in computer for "better artistic value" or something.

about a month and a half ago
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Two Explorers Descend Into An Active Volcano, and Live to Tell About It

rastos1 Re:Grandparents... (66 comments)

bunch of things you could also have done with a drone

Yeah. And clicking on Street View or Wikipedia is sooo much better then visiting Louvre, Egyptian pyramids or Kennedy Space Center in person ... And you don't even have to leave your mom's basement.

about a month and a half ago
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Privacy Vulnerabilities In Coursera, Including Exposed Student Email Addresses

rastos1 Re:Can they gain access to my courses? (31 comments)

Actually I would like to go back to some courses offered by Robert Sedgewick, Princeton. Those are the only courses that got closed after end-date.

about a month and a half ago
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Tox, a Skype Replacement Built On 'Privacy First'

rastos1 Re:Privacy Last (174 comments)

Where did you get the idea that USENET or IRC is supposed to facilitate one-to-one communication?

about a month and a half ago
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WikiLeaks' Assange Hopes To Exit London Embassy "Soon"

rastos1 Re:Diplomatic pouch? (299 comments)

That's like saying the police can't search you without a warrant, because it's a fourth amendment violation.

All that is needed to beat fourth amendment is "probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation".

about 2 months ago
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WikiLeaks' Assange Hopes To Exit London Embassy "Soon"

rastos1 Re:Diplomatic pouch? (299 comments)

While searching the aircraft they discover a big, remarkably car-shaped container that is legally an Ecuadorean soil. What next?

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Intel processors fails at math. Again.

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about two weeks ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "In a recent blog, software developer Bruce Dawson pointed out some issues with the way the FSIN instruction is described in the “Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual.”, noting that the result of FSIN can be very inaccurate in some cases, if compared to the exact mathematical value of the sine function.

Bruce Dawson says: I was shocked when I discovered this. Both the fsin instruction and Intel’s documentation are hugely inaccurate, and the inaccurate documentation has led to poor decisions being made. ... Intel has known for years that these instructions are not as accurate as promised. They are now making updates to their documentation. Updating the instruction is not a realistic option.

Intel processors had a problem with math in past"
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UK legalises music, film and e-book back-ups

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "A law has come into effect that permits UK citizens to make copies of CDs, MP3s, DVDs, Blu-rays and e-books. Consumers are allowed to keep the duplicates on local storage or in the cloud.
While it is legal to make back-ups for personal use, it remains an offence to share the data with friends or family. Users are not allowed to make recordings of streamed music or video from Spotify and Netflix, even if they subscribe to the services.
Thirteen years after iTunes launched, it is now legal to use it to rip CDs in the UK."

Link to Original Source
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5 years old bug in Linux kernel fixed

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 5 months ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Ars Technica takes a look at serious bug in the Linux kernel that was introduced in 2009. "The memory-corruption vulnerability, which was introduced in version 2.6.31-rc3, released no later than 2009, allows unprivileged users to crash or execute malicious code on vulnerable systems, according to the notes accompanying proof-of-concept code available here. The flaw resides in the n_tty_write function controlling the Linux pseudo tty device." This flaw has been identified as CVE-2014-0196."
Link to Original Source
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It's lights out for the National Security Agency

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 8 months ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "State lawmakers in Maryland have filed emergency status legislation that seeks to cut the NSA’s Ft. Meade headquarters off from all material support stemming from the state. House Bill 1074 (HB1074) would ban the NSA facility from all public state utilities, ban the use of NSA collected evidence in court, ban universities from partnering with the NSA and ban all political subdivisions from assisting the NSA from within the state. Any state entity, employee or contractor refusing to comply with the law would be immediately fired and banned from all future contracts within the state."
Link to Original Source
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Solar eruption to reach Earth within three days

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "The solar eruption, called a coronal mass ejection, occurred yesterday at 1:24 a.m. EDT (0524 GMT) and sent charged particles streaking outward at 380 miles per second. That's just over 1.3 million mph (2.2 million km/h). The solar fallout from the sun storm is expected to reach Earth within the next three days. Interestingly an unnamed icy comet from the outer solar system dove into the sun and disintegrated nearly a the same time."
Link to Original Source
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Don't worry, NSA says—we only "touch" 1.6% of daily global Internet traffi

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "On the same day that President Barack Obama spoke to the press about possible surveillance reforms—and released a related white paper on the subject—the National Security Agency came out with its own rare, publicly-released, seven-page document (PDF): "In its foreign intelligence mission, NSA touches about 1.6% of 1826 PB of information that the Internet carries per day"."
Link to Original Source
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Bolivia says Morales' plane diverted, apparently over Snowden

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Bolivia president Evo Morales' plane was forced to land in Austria on Tuesday after France and Portugal refused air permits, apparently because they suspected it was carrying Edward Snowden, the former U.S. spy agency contractor wanted by Washington on espionage charges. Bolivian Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca told reporters that Portugal and France had abruptly canceled the air permits, forcing the unscheduled Vienna stopover as Morales was returning on a Bolivian government plane from Russia."
Link to Original Source
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Egyptian Navy arrests scuba divers trying to cut underwater Internet cable

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Egypt's naval forces captured three scuba divers who were trying to cut an undersea Internet cable in the Mediterranean on Wednesday, a military spokesman said. Telecommunications executives meanwhile blamed a weeklong Internet slowdown on damage caused to another cable by a ship."
Link to Original Source
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US judge blocks indefinite detention of Americans

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "A US federal judge has temporarily blocked a section of the controversial National Defense Authorization Act that allows for the indefinite military detention of US citizens. In a 68-page ruling, US District Judge Katherine Forrest agreed on Wednesday that the statute failed to “pass constitutional muster” because its language could be interpreted quite broadly and eventually be used to suppress political dissent."
Link to Original Source
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Firefox devs mull dumping Java to stop BEAST attac

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "In a demonstration last Friday, it took less than two minutes for researchers Thai Duong and Juliano Rizzo to wield the exploit to recover an encrypted authentication cookie used to access a PayPal user account. The researchers settled on a Java applet as their means to bypass SOP, leading Firefox developers to discuss blocking the framework in a future version of the browser.
“I recommend that we blocklist all versions of the Java Plugin,” Firefox developer Brian Smith wrote on Tuesday in a discussion on Mozilla's online bug forum. “My understanding is that Oracle may or may not be aware of the details of the same-origin exploit. As of now, we have no ETA for a fix for the Java plugin.”"

Link to Original Source
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Going supernova

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "If you're the owner of a decent pair of binoculars train them on the handle of The Plough or Big Dipper a little after twilight tonight. The result of a massive explosion some 21 million light years away in the Pinwheel Galaxy M101, the nearest supernova of its type to be discovered for 40 years should be at its brightest tonight."
Link to Original Source
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Nuclear plant in your backyard?

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Inspired by http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/11/07/31/211251/Volunteer-Towns-Sought-For-Nuclear-Waste
What is the acceptable distance (in miles) of nearest nuclear waste storage site from your house?
0 — it could be in my mom's basement if I wasn't living there
1-20 — I have no problem with nuclear waste
20-100 — just keep it out of sight
101- 1000 didn't you hear this stuff DANGEROUS?"
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How bin Laden emailed without being detected

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Holed up in his walled compound in northeast Pakistan with no phone or Internet capabilities, bin Laden would type a message on his computer without an Internet connection, then save it using a thumb-sized flash drive. He then passed the flash drive to a trusted courier, who would head for a distant Internet cafe.

At that location, the courier would plug the memory drive into a computer, copy bin Laden's message into an email and send it. Reversing the process, the courier would copy any incoming email to the flash drive and return to the compound, where bin Laden would read his messages offline."

Link to Original Source
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Manning stripped of rights. And clothes.

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "For most of the past eight months, Manning has been required to sleep wearing only boxer shorts, because of his status as a detainee under "prevention of injury watch," said 1st Lt. Brian Villiard, a spokesman for the military detention facility, or "brig," in Quantico. Beginning Wednesday night, the facility commander ordered that Manning turn over his boxers, too."
Link to Original Source
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Britain has received warrant on Assange

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "BBC reports that Britain has received a European arrest warrant from Sweden for the Wikileaks' founder Julian Assange. The warrant is being processed by the Serious Organised Crime Agency and will be sent to the Metropolitan Police as he is thought to be in the London area."
Link to Original Source
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Deutche Telecom plans to offer IPv6

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  about 4 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "The Deutsche Telekom will provide dual stack IPv4/IPv6 connectivity for all DSL users (google translation) as of end of 2011. The users will be in addition to their IPv4 address assigned IPv6 /56 prefix. Interesting is that this prefix will be dynamic. For permanently connected users, the prefix will change rarely. Customers that have purchased fixed IPv4 address, will get an offer for stable IPv6 prefix."
Link to Original Source
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Registration required to get JDK

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "I run today across a forum message mentioning that one needs to register in order to download Java Development Kit. Indeed. Looking at the list of benefits I don't think they apply to me and the requirement makes me compelled to use the "Feedback" for the first time ever. All I ever wanted was the JDK archive and API docs in a zip. Now it looks like I will have to come up with one more fake identity when I will want to update my development environment because I got lost in the forest of privacy policy documents within a few minutes. All I could find is that cookies have expiration time less than a year. What is the slashdot crowd position on this?"
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Catch a plane, or wait for bomb squad?

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "Part of Munich airport in southern Germany was shut down for several hours after a traveler's laptop set off an explosives detector. ... Officials had wanted to check the computer again but the man had left. ... A police spokesman quoted by AFP news agency cautioned that the scanner could have been set off by chemicals such as perfumes, and that the man might simply have been in a hurry to catch his plane.

I'm so glad the security of air traffic is taken care of."

Link to Original Source
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SSL renegotiation attack becomes reality

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "A Turkish grad student has devised a serious, real-world attack on Twitter that targeted a recently discovered vulnerability in the SSL protocol. The exploit by Anil Kurmus is significant because it successfully targeted the so-called SSL renegotiation bug to steal Twitter login credentials that passed through encrypted data streams. All in all, a man in the middle is able to steal the credentials of a user authenticating himself through HTTPS to a trusted website.

The attack description is available on securegoose.org"

Link to Original Source
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Airline passenger bill of rights

rastos1 rastos1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rastos1 (601318) writes "If the airlines really want talk Congress out of passing a passenger bill of rights, they're not doing themselves any favors. The latest air-travel horror story comes to us from Minnesota, where 47 passengers on a Continental Airlines regional flight spent nearly 14 hours in transit and were trapped in six-hour ground delay on a 50-seat regional jet ... the airline wouldn't let passengers off the plane because TSA screeners had gone home and passengers legally couldn't get back on the plane."

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