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Study: Light-Emitting Screens Before Bedtime Disrupt Sleep

rdnetto Re:I had this problem, then I got f.lux. (171 comments)

On Unix, sadly, only Adobe Flash player detects color corrections and plays your video in proper color. Neither Google nor Mozilla have figured this out for flash video, either.

Strictly speaking, wouldn't you want the video to be in the adjusted colour? Most of my late night PC usage is watching video, and I don't even notice the change anymore. (It helps that Redshift gradually changes the colour temp.) That said, I found it made a huge difference to my sleeping patterns.

2 days ago
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Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

rdnetto Re:a progressive new group (323 comments)

your reference to male suicide rates means you're a "men's rights" nut too, so you're not only for conservatism, you're also robustly against anything that isn't conservatism.

I'm not a men's right activist / masculinist (I prefer egalitarianism), but a lot of the gender based inequities come down to the imposition of traditional values / stereotypes. In that sense, I think that such lines of thought are more probably more progressive than conservative, especially since things like allowing and accepting men to demonstrate feminine qualities are pretty much non-existent among conservatives.

Also, is it such a bad thing if a demographic has above average suicide rates and we want to fix that?

P.S. the parent post read like a troll, I just wanted to rebut that assocation

2 days ago
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Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

rdnetto Re:I don't even... (323 comments)

I'm thinking homework that is numerical or multiple choice

And that's your mistake. As I understand it, the point of homework (in addition to reinforcing what was taught), is to identify what the students did wrong and help them to understand the mistake. A simple correct/incorrect answer doesn't do that.

2 days ago
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Texas Instruments Builds New Energy Technology For the Internet of Things

rdnetto Re:Your power level! (54 comments)

But the reality is that current requirements vary. A car battery is rated for ~300 A at 12 V. A laptop power supply might be rated for ~2 A at 12 V. An LED consumes about 10 mA at ~3V. A microcontroller can run off microAmps at 5 V.

All those voltages are within the same order of magnitude, but the currents span 8 orders of magnitude, and in practice you wouldn't even change the PCB design or wiring for anything 0.1 A.

2 days ago
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Texas Instruments Builds New Energy Technology For the Internet of Things

rdnetto Re:Your power level! (54 comments)

If I'm reading the packaging info right, the pitch spacing is 0.50 mm. For context, that's about the width of a 0603 resistor (0.8 mm). So, if you have a very steady hand and a microscope, it should be doable.
Also, I suspect if there's enough interest someone like Sparkfun will start selling these on breakout boards...

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source .NET Up To the Job?

rdnetto Re:Why bother? (417 comments)

why is Apache still spawning processes for every request that comes in... don't they realize the overhead of that?

My guess is they're UNIX devs - under Linux (and probably some other Unices), forking is ridiculously cheap. In fact (IIRC), spawning a thread has more overhead than forking, since Linux threads are just processes which share resources.

I'm not sure how many people are using Apache under Windows, but I wouldn't be surprised if they were a minority.

3 days ago
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RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

rdnetto Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (110 comments)

Ah, I think you misunderstood me. When I said that it uses challenge-response, I was referring to the cryptographic challenge-response (e.g. the card receives a message, signs it with a private key, then transmits the signature), in contrast to magstripe, where data is simply read from the stripe.

about a week ago
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Grinch Vulnerability Could Put a Hole In Your Linux Stocking

rdnetto Re:Grinch is not a flaw - has no CVE!!! (118 comments)

Do you need root to add yourself to the 'wheel' group?

Yes.
Hint: on Debian-based distros, wheel is better known as sudoers.

about a week ago
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Cause and Effect: How a Revolutionary New Statistical Test Can Tease Them Apart

rdnetto Re:No problem. (137 comments)

I suspect the test could be generalized to work for N variables, since the noise should increase as we move along a causal chain. The only issue is the exponential drop-off in confidence. If the accuracy could be improved, it could be quite useful for deriving or verifying Bayesian networks.

about a week ago
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Hackers Compromise ICANN, Access Zone File Data System

rdnetto Re:Some people better be out of a job... (110 comments)

And replace it with what, exactly?

Seriously, how do you intend to manage all of the addressing, both the IP level and the human-readable level, without some form of central authority?

I've been playing around with some ideas lately on how to implement a decentralised DNS, and what it basically comes down to is how you resolve conflicts. e.g. Microsoft reserves www.microsoft.com, then I try to do so. Ideally, the order shouldn't affect the final result, because a first-come-first-server system encourages squatting. Crypto-based systems also have to consider if the domain name can be reacquired if the private key is lost/stolen.
Here's a quick summary of the different approaches:

Traditional DNS: uses first-come-first-serve (FCFS) and conflicts are resolved through legal means (trademark law). Conflicts are resolved by the registrar - the second application is denied because the name is already in use. Centralized.

mDNS: uses multicast, impractical for global usage. No conflict resolution. This is the only decentralized approach that doesn't involve a DHT.

Microsoft PNRP: requires registrars which sign names to handle conflict resolution. (The unsecured variant has no conflict resolution.) Also requires IPv6, which is currently impractical.

Namecoin (decentralized with FCFS): Conflict resolution is implemented algorithmically. There is a small (1 cent) cost associated with updates.

Decentralized with voting: whichever resolvent the majority decide is official gets the domain name. Impractical, due to ease with which fake votes could be created. (Can be mitigated by making voting expensive - the bitcoin approach.)

Decentralized with trust-on-first-use (TOFU): conflict resolution is implemented by the resolver. Where there is a unique resolvent, it is used and added to a list of trusted resolvents. Where there are multiple resolvents, and the name has not been resolved by the user previously, the client may check white/blacklists published by other clients whom they have previously marked as trusted. If unique resolution is still not possible, manual intervention is required.

Currently I'm leaning towards the TOFU approach, since it's an extension of what's currently used for SSH clients. The only issue is that allowing multiple clients to resolve the same name differently borders on breaking the internet (see RFC 2826). However, it does have the nice property that it's the only decentralized system where a name-holder have their private key seized by an attacker, and still recover the domain name (by creating new keys and having people blacklist the old domain name in favour of them).

If anyone has some ideas/suggestions on this, I'd love to hear them.

about a week ago
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RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

rdnetto Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (110 comments)

The VISA Pay Wave doesn't have user challenge/response, it's simply a wireless magstripe.

Do you have a citation for that? It seems odd to me that they would use such a weak mechanism, when the existing chip already uses challenge/response.
The standard used is ISO/IEC 14443, which enables half-duplex communications, suggesting that challenge/response is at least plausible.

Additionally, in my country (Australia), I found that when they introduced PIN-less transactions for contact less cards below a certain threshold ($100), PINs were no longer required when the chip was inserted, which is consistent with my belief that the RFID mechanism is just another means of connecting to the chip.

about a week ago
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RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

rdnetto Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (110 comments)

Got my passport in 2006, don't think it has RFID. My VISA card does - or did until I centered a hole punch over the chip and whacked it with a hammer. That was strangely satisfying :-)

I really don't understand this logic. Yes, wireless connections to the card are a risk (and I say that as someone who took measures to shield my wallet), but that risk is minuscule in comparison to the risks associated with using the magstripe (vulnerable to skimming) instead of the chip (uses challenge and response).
These days, if someone requires me to use magstripe, I look at the terminal extremely carefully before swiping.

about a week ago
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Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

rdnetto Re:huh what? (388 comments)

The practical effect is the same - the user is denied access to the site via an attack on the name resolution protocol. If the registrar is subpoenaed, it doesn't matter if they set the domain to resolve to a takedown notice or a NXDOMAIN result - the practical result is that anyone who doesn't have the site's IP address written down will be unable to access it.

Both hosting and registering the domain outside of the US will provide some resilience if you are doing something they don't like, though they can still block resolution for everyone who isn't using DNSSEC.

about a week ago
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Economists Say Newest AI Technology Destroys More Jobs Than It Creates

rdnetto Re:Public road is not for joy riding... (677 comments)

There's a level in risk in life that most people are willing to accept in order to live life the way they want. Just because some people are happy wrapped up on cotton wool and kept away from any possible harm doesn't mean that sort of life should be inflicted on the entire population.

Society as a whole is what decides where on the freedom-safety spectrum it lies. Given that we already have speed limits, it's not unlikely that limits on manual driving may be put in place eventually.

about a week ago
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Apparent Islamic Terrorism Strikes Sydney

rdnetto Re:It's time to act! (879 comments)

This is Australia. We don't have constitutional rights - our constitution merely codifies the relationship between the states, territories, federal government and the commonwealth.

about two weeks ago
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OpenMotics Offers Open Source (and Open Hardware) Home Automation

rdnetto Re:Piss poor open source (36 comments)

For an executable work, complete source code means all the source code for all modules it contains, plus any associated interface definition files, plus the scripts used to control compilation and installation of the executable.

The wording of the GPL is quite clear - it only requires the Makefiles to be included, and even adds an exception for the compiler when included with the OS as a runtime dependency. It doesn't say anything about the requirement to include the compiler.

Keep in mind that when the GPL was first written, GCC was only 2 years old, and proprietary compilers were unavoidable in many areas. Even today, proprietary compilers are still unavoidable for certain applications. e.g. FPGAs. To require the publishers of open source programs to cover the cost of licensing the compiler for all their users would have been insane, and significantly limited the spread of open source software.

The obvious intent of the GPL is for you to get a code in a way that allows you to work with it and get results.

The intention of the GPLv2, to paraphrase Linus Torvalds, is that in exchange for the ability to modify the software to suit yourself, the changes you make can be merged back into the upstream. The GPLv3 places a greater focus on the ability of the user to generate a useful executable, but the v2 was chosen (possibly intentionally) for this instead. Whatever your opinion on v3, their choice of v2 speaks for itself.

about two weeks ago
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Keurig 2.0 Genuine K-Cup Spoofing Vulnerability

rdnetto Re:Keurig's only reason is profit. (270 comments)

The solution is the same as for the razor blade model - stick with products which accept generic consumables. e.g. coffee grinders that take beans, or double edged razors (all the blades have the same shape and are intercompatible). The difference in cost is usually about an order of magnitude. e.g. DE razor blades are ~30c each.

about two weeks ago
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The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

rdnetto Re:Help! (567 comments)

Like this

about two weeks ago
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The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

rdnetto Re:Have Both (567 comments)

I've rotated my screen 360 degrees :-)

Does it improve the picture now that you have twisted cables?

Make sure you rotate by -360 degress in the Southern Hemisphere or the electrons will get tangled.

Do that and they'll disappear into a singularity (mathematical, not physical). What you really need is to use quaternions, like -ijk.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Debian to Adopt New Init System

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  about a year ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "Debian developers have been in a very polarized discussion recently about replacing their default SysVinit system with a more modern init system; namely, Debian developers are evaluating whether to use systemd or Upstart.

Debian wants to switch a modern event-based init system that is more robust and provides more features, provides stable support for advanced environments (e.g. SAN), being more similar to the likes of Ubuntu and RHEL, and modern open-source packages like GNOME 3.x are easier to package. Among other reasons, Debian hasn't been quick to switch init systems over lots of work needing to be accomplished.

In one of the latest init system discussions, it was stated "since the init system strongly shapes many other packages, there has to be only one and no other supported options.""

Link to Original Source
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Australian Govt re-kindles office file format war Australian Govt re-kindles of

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "The Australian Government’s peak IT strategy group has issued a cautious updated appraisal of currently available office productivity suite file formats, in what appears to be an attempt to more fully explain its thinking about the merits of open standards such as OpenDocument versus more proprietary file formats promulgated by vendors like Microsoft.
Though a move away from a clear pro-Microsoft stance, a clear bias towards them remains present."

Link to Original Source
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AI Releases Linux-based Hybrid Netboot/Tablet/MID

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "After 6 months of delays, AlwaysInnovating has released their newest device, a netbook with a touchscreen and detachable wireless keyboard. The screen also houses a secondary screen that can be removed and used as a mobile internet device. The device uses the TI Cortex A8, has 768 MB of RAM, and 19.5 Ah of batteries."
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Software is Licensed, Not Sold

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "In a major blow to user rights, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has issued a decision that will go a long way toward ensuring that software buyers will rarely be software owners.
In a triumph of legal formalism over reality, the Court held that the copyright’s first sale doctrine – the law that allows you to resell books and that protects libraries and archives from claims of copyright infringement – doesn’t apply to software (and possibly DVDs, CDs and other “licensed” content) as long as the vendor saddles the transfer with enough restrictions to transform what the buyer may think is sale into a mere license."

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EFF Wins New DMCA Exceptions

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) won three critical exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) anticircumvention provisions today, carving out new legal protections for consumers who modify their cell phones and artists who remix videos — people who, until now, could have been sued for their non-infringing or fair use activities."
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Pirate Party to Run Pirate Bay from Parliament

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "After their former hosting provider received an injunction telling it to stop providing bandwidth to The Pirate Bay, the worlds most resilient BitTorrent site switched to a new ISP. That host, the Swedish Pirate Party, made a stand on principle. Now they aim to take things further by running the site from inside the Swedish Parliament.

The party has announced today that they intend to use part of the Swedish Constitution to further these goals, specifically Parliamentary Immunity from prosecution or lawsuit for things done as part of their political mandate. They intend to push the non-commercial sharing part of their manifesto, by running The Pirate Bay from ‘inside’ the Parliament, by Members of Parliament."

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POLL: Which continent do you live in?

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "POLL: Which continent do you live in?
        North America
        South America
        Antarctica
        Africa
        Europe
        Asia
        Australia
        I don't live on Earth, you insensitive clod!"
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Pirate Bay Judge Accused of Bias

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "One of the biggest cases in file-sharing history ended last week with The Pirate Bay Four sentenced to huge fines and jail time. Today it is revealed that far from being impartial, the judge in the case is a member of pro-copyright lobby groups — along with Henrik Pontén, Monique Wadsted and Peter Danowsky. There are loud calls for a retrial.
http://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-lawyer-is-biased-calls-for-a-retrial-090423/"
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Part of Copyright Act Ruled Unconstitutional

rdnetto rdnetto writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rdnetto (955205) writes "From http://techdirt.com/articles/20090403/1619494384.shtml:
A year and a half ago, we were quite surprised when the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals actually sided with Larry Lessig, concerning how a part of copyright law that pulled foreign works out of the public domain was potentially unconstitutional. This was in the "Golan case," the third of three big copyright cases Lessig had championed. The appeals court had sent the case back to the lower court, and that lower court has now decided that, indeed, a trade agreement (URAA) that pulled foreign content out of the public domain is unconstitutional as it violates the First Amendment. While it may seem narrowly focused, this is the first case that has successfully challenged a part of copyright law as being unconstitutional. The ruling will almost certainly be appealed, so it's not over yet — but it's still a rare and important win for those who are fighting to keep copyright law from destroying the public domain."

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