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Comments

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Ask Slashdot: Convincing My Company To Stop Using Passwords?

rhsanborn Re:Every 30 days. (247 comments)

I stand corrected. Thank you.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Convincing My Company To Stop Using Passwords?

rhsanborn Re:Every 30 days. (247 comments)

That is one of the xkcd comics that really bugs me. Yes, if you treat every character as an independent element and try to calculate it's complexity, those passwords look really complex. Unfortunately, most password crackers aren't brute force crackers that try every character combination. They try combinations of well known words, phrases, and number/symbol combinations. So, you're mathematically complex password is exactly what crackers are looking for.

To be fair, as long as you're the only one in your company doing it, it's reasonably secure, as soon as it becomes company policy, all your passwords fall within regular cracking procedures, and are likely easier to crack.

about two weeks ago
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Starbucks Testing Mobile Order and Pay In Portland On iOS

rhsanborn Opening sentence doesn't help... (40 comments)

For those who just can't help writing condescending opening lines... Isn't technology supposed to make our lives easier? This sounds darned convenient. I suspect location services are to ensure you're within range.

about two weeks ago
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The Cost of the "S" In HTTPS

rhsanborn Re:Sounds good to me (238 comments)

The single biggest risk for data loss, and the single best vector for hacking a network is employees either nefarious or technically un-inclined. There's a good reason management wants exposure to traffic, it's to ensure that sensitive data isn't leaving.

about two weeks ago
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Sony To Take On Netflix With Playstation Vue

rhsanborn Re:Stupid (130 comments)

That's because they need to stop trying to make a Netflix clone and do something new. Apple pay isn't better or all that different from Google's NFC pay, the difference is that they've done the legwork to build a network of vendors. Similarly, whoever can build a model where their service has live streams of TV shows and channels that people want, or something similar, will be fantastically successful. It's not clear, but this may very well do that.

about a month ago
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Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don't Think They're Smart

rhsanborn Re:This. (273 comments)

No, it's about encouraging the correct behaviors, not the correct results. Most people fail several times while studying/practicing STEM subjects (or most subjects worth studying, for that matter). If we insist on telling little Johnny how gosh darned smart he is all the time, he may not be any good at handling that failure. Or he may assume that "he isn't a math person" because he's always been told how smart he is, and he just isn't getting it. Instead, we ought to be encouraging him to try harder, fail better, and reward him for persistence, and good study habits.

Society rewards results. Definitely. So getting excellent results is important. But, parents and teachers aren't necessarily there to evaluate results. They're there to teach Johnny how to get them. Rewarding hard work, and continued effort is one important way to get those results, and it hasn't been focused on. Instead, we tell him that it's alright that he didn't get the right answer, and he should stop trying so hard and come have a cookie so he doesn't lower his self-esteem. This has the opposite effect, he doesn't get the results, and he fails to learn about work ethic.

about a month and a half ago
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Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment

rhsanborn Re:Boys are naturally curious... (608 comments)

Ah, the classic, "I don't like the peers, so now we get to fall back to no data whatsoever and argue from gut feelings" gambit. Good one gweihir, good one. Fortunately, that's not how science works, or we'd all be screwed. "Your peer group way over-represents geologists, and is therefore skewed toward round-earthism, therefore we can now discuss my ideas of flat-earthism as equal and valid."

about 2 months ago
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Obama Administration Argues For Backdoors In Personal Electronics

rhsanborn Re:Update to Godwin's law? (575 comments)

It won't ever hit the news, because it will be ordered by a FISA court and it will have a clause stating Apple can't disclose that this was a government mandated opening.

about 3 months ago
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CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

rhsanborn Re:Simple solution (462 comments)

Or you forced departments to pay back double or triple plus court costs for improper seizures.They'd suddenly be much more careful.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

rhsanborn Re:Sport. Black. (471 comments)

It doesn't cost more than the phone. It's perceived to cost more than the phone because they've hidden the cost of the phone from you. The base model iPhone 6 (16GB) costs $650.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

rhsanborn Re:I have Pebble Steel (471 comments)

My kicker with the Pebble is that it can only do one thing at a time. I want a time watch-face up, and I want a fitness tracker in the background, for example.

about 3 months ago
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Apple Announces Smartwatch, Bigger iPhones, Mobile Payments

rhsanborn Re:Any removable storage yet? (730 comments)

It's no more clunky than carrying a bag full of spare batteries to swap out.

about 3 months ago
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Net Neutrality Is 'Marxist,' According To a Koch-Backed Astroturf Group

rhsanborn Re:What's so American (531 comments)

They can bask in their pure capitalist sunshine as soon as they buy right of way access for every mile of line they use, instead of leveraging the government sponsored right of way access they've been given. They can also pay a requisite sum for the monopoly access they were granted. Then they can setup any internet they want. Until then, they need to deal with regulations.

about 4 months ago
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Sony Tosses the Sony Reader On the Scrap Heap

rhsanborn Re:They still do a reader for the professional mar (172 comments)

The device was great, but no one really buys a Kindle for the device. They buy it for convenience and content. The Sony ebook store had a terrible selection. Worse, you had to buy it on the computer and transfer it to your device. Nirvana is achieved when you can pick up your ereader, decide you want a book, and can complete the selection and sale immediately. That's why Amazon was willing to eat the cost of the cell subscriptions, because it meant people could complete a purchase when they wanted, not when it was logistically feasible. That's become easier now with more ubiquitous wifi, but Amazon won on content and ease of availability.

I still own a PRS-505 and it's a wonderful device, especially paired with Calibre, but it's used almost exclusively to lend to people while I used my Kindle Paperwhite.

about 4 months ago
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FDA: We Can't Scale To Regulate Mobile Health Apps

rhsanborn Re:Not medical grade instruments ... (123 comments)

Unfortunately, companies like Apple are developing services to aggregate health data from things like wifi BP cuffs, scales, activity trackers, pulse oximeters, etc. And, physicians and regulators are already looking at ways to integrate that information into a broader plan of care. So, regardless of it's novelty, it's going to be used for very real medical decisions. At the very least, there needs to be better education about the lack of oversight and the potential for wildly inaccurate data, and I don't get the feeling that's happening.

about 5 months ago
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The Computer Security Threat From Ultrasonic Networks

rhsanborn Re:A (hidden) communication channel is not an atta (121 comments)

This is a good way to hide your snooping in sensitive environments that are running adaptive intrusion detection systems. It's also a way to get secure computers that aren't connected to the network, to talk to less secure computers that are. Think military. Jim falls prey to a USB based piece of malware and puts it on a DoD machine that is on their internal, secure network. It talks to an Internet-connected computer to move data from one to the other. The USB vector is exactly how the US/Israel got malware onto Iranian centrifuge controller systems, so it's a valid concern.

about 6 months ago
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This 360-Degree, 4K Video Camera isn't Getting Kickstarted (Video)

rhsanborn Sad? (61 comments)

Why is it sad that people didn't donate money to a for profit company?

about 7 months ago
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The Light Might Make You Heavy

rhsanborn Re:Poverty and city living. (138 comments)

Note also that healthy food from scratch takes more time to prepare, which is also a luxury that isn't available to the single mom taking the bus to 2 and 3 jobs.

about 7 months ago
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Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Buys the LA Clippers For $2 Billion

rhsanborn Re:Wow that much money? (270 comments)

We just need a political angle and maybe we can get Glenn Beck to "ask some questions"...

about 7 months ago

Submissions

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Obama and Romney Respond to ScienceDebate.org Questionnaire

rhsanborn rhsanborn writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rhsanborn (773855) writes "President Barack Obama and Republican Presidential Nominee Mitt Romney have both responded to a questionnaire on the "most important science policy questions facing the United States". The questionnaire was created by ScienceDebate.org, a group consisting of many influential organizations in science and engineering. Questions are on many topics including research, internet regulation, and climate change."
Link to Original Source
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Federal Appeals Court Orders TSA to Explain Delay in Body Scan Public Hearing

rhsanborn rhsanborn writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rhsanborn (773855) writes "One year ago the District of Columbia Court of Appeals ordered the TSA to hold public comment on the use body scanners in EPIC vs. DHS. The order has been ignored prompting a WhiteHouse.gov petition asking for the Obama Administration's response. One year later, Wired reports, the court has ordered the TSA to explain why it hasn't responded to it's original order. The TSA has until August 30th to respond."
Link to Original Source

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