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Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

rickb928 Re: The US Internet Shutdown Switch (349 comments)

Really. You could have proposed Britain and Iceland. Lack of true free speech rights combined with an alarming lack of respect for the 1% = balance.

Russia could overfly Vanuatu once, problem solved.
At least you didn't defend the UN...

yesterday
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Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

rickb928 Re:DNS was always optional (349 comments)

It's inevitable that the copyright holders will expect IP addresses or ranges to be blocked or simply deleted from routing tables.

And then innocent bystanders will become caught up in this.

That's how this escalates. And how it is dangerous to let them do even the little thing.

yesterday
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Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

rickb928 What remedies at law exist? (349 comments)

For other types of distribution, what remedies at law exist?

For instance, if I start mailing pirated Blu-Ray disc all over the world, do they instruct the various shipping agents, postal agencies, and so forth to refuse to accept anything from me, and also to refuse to deliver to me? Can they do this without informing me? Do I have recourse if this also denies me lawful services?

If I merely pack and ship these discs for someone else, is there a fix in law to also deny me access to shipping methods?

Do they put me/us in jail? Do they have the right to go wherever I am in the world, arrest me, and imprison me for this? Would I be denied even the mail from the court informing me of this?

This seems to be another example of technology being used to accomplish what could not be otherwise done. Removing a domain from DNS sure does eliminate their ability to distribute illegally-derived content, but doing so surreptitiously seems to be nasty business.

Is this an expansion of enforcement actions that may not itself be legal?

yesterday
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Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

rickb928 Re:The US Internet Shutdown Switch (349 comments)

I don't prefer to ignore this. I instead am thankful.

You don't want the UN involved. And you'll have to recommend a better nation or group of nations to oversee DNS. Or another corporation.

This arrangement has worked very well for a long time. There is nothing to fix, and everything to defend.

yesterday
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Want To Influence the World? Map Reveals the Best Languages To Speak

rickb928 Re: Mandarin vs. Spanish (142 comments)

I suspect it was dialog, not food, that was the object.

2 days ago
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Want To Influence the World? Map Reveals the Best Languages To Speak

rickb928 Re: Let me be the first to say... (142 comments)

Of the bilinguals I deal with, Francophones will speak English with minimal reluctance. Asians will readily. Spanish-speakers much less so. But my sample size is in the dozens.

2 days ago
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Small Bank In Kansas Creates the Bank Account of the Future

rickb928 Re: Unless it has support for Bitcoin... (152 comments)

It's bad where you are, you just don't see it. Unless you live where banks aren't a big deal

2 days ago
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Small Bank In Kansas Creates the Bank Account of the Future

rickb928 Re:Congratulations you've invented the credit card (152 comments)

It's called Overdraft Protection by my bank. Bank-style interest today is what, 1.35%? Nope, more like 0.45%. CDs are going for 1%APY.

There is a scheme here.

2 days ago
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Small Bank In Kansas Creates the Bank Account of the Future

rickb928 Re:Unless it has support for Bitcoin... (152 comments)

No, you had it right.

I'm having a tiff with my tap-to-pay, prepaid card, and credit union all unable to offer me the services they each still advertise.

My tap-to-pay app is linked to a prepaid card. This can be loaded by ACH, debit card, credit card, or cash. All of which worked until this fall.

I noticed my automatic debit loads were failing, and asked my credit union. It took some time, and they initially pointed me to the prepaid card provider. Who claimed it was being declined, despite funds available. I checked, and eventually found that my debit card, from Visa, no longer permitted this 'merchant' to use a transaction code that is described as a 'Visa Money transaction'. The credit union says their hands are tied.

The prepaid provider claims they were forced to recode these transactions as 'Visa Money', by, yes, Visa. Why? No answer but I have a theory:

- Visa Money transactions earn discount and interchange fees like any debit transaction.
- But debiting my account this way does earn the prepaid provider a discount fee when I withdraw the funds from there. (No interchange, so you know who this is)
- However, if I were to load my prepaid card with a credit card, this becomes a cash advance. Which earns a higher interest rate in most cases. and is paid LAST by most banks if I pay off my balance. Actually, since I may never pay off the balance, these cash advances will forever be charging interest at that higher rate. Forever. Unless I do pay the balance to zero. I have to pay off the lower interest rate transactions FIRST before I can pay off the higher rate ones. Sharp practice.
- So I cannot any more load from my debit card. Visa rejects the 'Visa Money' transaction for my debit card.

Well, my prepaid provider is unwilling to change anything of this, my credit union is unwilling, possibly unable to, and I'm stubborn enough to cling to the prepaid despite the inconvenience of cash loads.

ACH, you say?

ACH takes 5 days to clear. It just does. This is mostly my prepaid provider's fault, I know, from research. No apologies. It just does. They use the float.

Now, how does all this actually work out good for me?

- I get promotional rebates for using tap-to-pay, which will expire. Then I will reassess the situation.
- I also get promotional rebates from the prepaid card, those also will expire.
- I get fees waived on the prepaid card, which I do not expect to expire any time soon. Free so far.
- And cash loads are fee-free for now also.

But the fees make the systems work. So fees it is. All the way down.

Those of you who pay attention to the payments industry know the names of all the entities I;'d rather not expose explicitly. There are similar problems for every other, EVERY OTHER, institution. Fees drive the industry, and revenue is necessary to keep the servers on to do all this. I get it.

But it's cheap to advertise you can, and then you won't. And to hide behind disclaimers and contractual language that clearly serves you, not your customers. that is the game, and I know it.

2 days ago
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Small Bank In Kansas Creates the Bank Account of the Future

rickb928 Re:Unless it has support for Bitcoin... (152 comments)

Wow. You don't understand what a payday loan is.

The 'Payday' in payday loans describes both the method and timing of payments. Most people taking out payday loans do so intending to make payments when they get their money, which is usually payday. These are generally secured loans, title loans secured by the borrower's car most common, though some are not. The loan company regularly imposes limited payment options, for instance requiring payment in cash, in person, at the specified office. If your car breaks down, the traffic goes really bad for the first time in 2 years, or you get sick, you risk default. these companies are happy you default, as mostly these defaults occur well into the term of the loan, the usurious interest rates assure the principal has been paid, and the collateral is just more profit. It's a nasty business.

For those who are essentially unbanked, this is one of few options for solving cash flow problems such as car repairs or a lost paycheck due to layoffs or any number of circumstances beyond their control.

This short video further explores the problems of the unbanked.

2 days ago
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Forbes Blasts Latests Windows 7 Patch as Malware

rickb928 Re: Short sighted (228 comments)

If I encounter a hibernation data issue, I reboot. In fact, my Windows alerts me and offers to clear and reboot, try again, or sometimes go to safe mode.

Reinstalling? Nope.

2 days ago
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Vinyl Record Pressing Plants Struggle To Keep Up With Demand

rickb928 Re: Not really missing vinyl (431 comments)

FM pilot is 19kHz. Good quality FM is possible. What's not appreciated is the quality you can get out of AM broadcast.

2 days ago
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Forbes Blasts Latests Windows 7 Patch as Malware

rickb928 Re: Short sighted (228 comments)

My Windows 7 laptop doesn't fragment due to hibernation. My Windows 8.1 laptop ditto.

But I'm not the one trying to use AMD drivers.

2 days ago
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Forbes Blasts Latests Windows 7 Patch as Malware

rickb928 Re: Short sighted (228 comments)

You're doing it wrong.

Hibernate.

3 days ago
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Vinyl Record Pressing Plants Struggle To Keep Up With Demand

rickb928 Re: Not really missing vinyl (431 comments)

And what speakers output as sound isn't very accurate, compared to the input electrical signal.

What that last conversion does is ugly.

3 days ago
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Vinyl Record Pressing Plants Struggle To Keep Up With Demand

rickb928 Re: Not really missing vinyl (431 comments)

My right ear easily discerns 15,734Hz (really annoying back in day of analog TV) and reasonably good discernment to about 18.7KHz (tested by a doctor). My left ear is virtually useless beyond about 8KHz, which makes for a hard time reply listening to music - I extrapolate a LOT my head. My hobby in recording and sound reinforcement was always a challenge.

Try to convince people that you can in fact hear their TV flyback transformer whine and you get blank stares. I've proven it to tech by picking the noisy flyback blindfolded ( and not forgiving the 'touch this' trick at 25KV), and fortunately that's a thing of the past.

But I've met people who could hear much better, most of whom made their living on that. Very instructive. I loathe MP3s at anything less than 320k, but lots of radio uses much less rate. I'm not disappointed it the difference between vinyl and CD, though with a good noise gate you can make vinyl sound a lot like CD. I'm always resampling my CDs in my online libraries such seem to revert to lower rates for some odd reason. Hmmm...

3 days ago
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Blade Runner 2 Script Done, Harrison Ford Says "the Best Ever"

rickb928 Lots of possibilities (294 comments)

There is the problem of just how replicants 'escape', conspiracies abounding.

Deckard may be recreated every 4 years or so, with his last memories intact, an interesting way to use replicants.

Time for two or more Deckards? On than one planet?

Time for more Rachels? Or just the same one over and over?

Who's running Tyrell?

If the recycled Deckard gets older, that satisfies his own self-doubt about his nature. Cover for his replicantism. And he can always be left dead if he gets too close to the truth.

And he could be a minor character in the continuing story...

4 days ago
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Is Enterprise IT More Difficult To Manage Now Than Ever?

rickb928 Re:There are many more good questions now (238 comments)

Our worksite bandwidth isn't constrained by the circuit, it's the firewalling. We are one of the top ten targets in the universe. Given that, I'm not slowed down by external access, but by internal firewalls. We have to protect against internal threats also.

A production server requires three instances - production, test, and development. Days to implement, weeks to approve. We have to actually know what it will be expected to do before we can request it.

I'm currently using around 120GB of storage, of which 40GB is purely redundant. I'm limited only by the shared volumes, and I see about 16TB available. Our tech now knows that this storage is cheap.

Our website managers, however, believe we need a world-class presence, so we are now engaged in rapid releases, monthly. This is a reporting site our customers use to get statements, details, and resolve complaints. I'm not sure we need to team the site so often, but I'll let our customers make that point.

Not all corporate IT is lost and dysfunctional.

5 days ago

Submissions

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Cox Coaster, life in the frustrating lane

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So, I've become a participant in the Cox Coaster trial here in the Phoenix area, and I'm wondering if any of you have had a shot at this elsewhere, or if you have some questions about it.

Coaster is Cox's IPTV offering, still being built and tested apparently. As part of the deal, I got a new Cisco router/firewall/wifi hub, the Coaster PC, HDMI cable, and TWO remotes.

And so far, it is an unrewarding experience, but I'm not done trying it out. Verdict pending.

Questions?"

Link to Original Source
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We're the governent, and we're here to secure you

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So the Pentagon, with their shiny new CyberCom commander and all that, are trying to convince corporate CEOs and "companies that operate critical infrastructures" to let them install monitoring systems on their networks or, quote, "stay in the wild wild west of the unprotected internet".

From the article:

"Defense Deputy Secretary William Lynn III, speaking at the Strategic Command Cyber Symposium in Nebraska, said we need to think imaginatively about how to use the National Security Agencyââs Einstein monitoring systems on critical private-sector networks ââ such as those in the financial, utility and communication industries ââ in order to protect us."

Sure sounds good to me. Let the Pentagon keep an eye on your critical network, and they will not only alert you to something going wrong, but they'll even respond to the threat. And if you operate 'critical infrastructure'. you owe it to our nation to opt-in, right? I mean. What could go wrong? It's the Pentagon, surely they know what they're doing, right?"

Link to Original Source
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Hidden web ads inflate revenues, don't annoy us

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "Well, sort of...

The Wall Street Journal publishes here (Same story, who stole what???) and here:

'Kraft Foods, Greyhound Lines and Capital One Financial have bought some strange ads on the Internet lately. What's so strange about them is that they're invisible.

The companies might not have known about their invisible display ads — the kind that are supposed to appear alongside content on Web pages — if not for Ben Edelman, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School who studies Internet advertising.

Mr. Edelman says his research shows that all three marketers, and many others, have fallen victim to Web sites that use such ads as a way to sell more ad space than they have.

The Web sites can get away with it, he says, because online advertisers don't always audit their campaigns for proof their ads are appearing. It isn't clear how common these ads are or how much they cost marketers.

Mr. Edelman and other Internet-security experts say the ads are created with the use of computer code that makes it look to marketers as though their ads are showing up on legitimate Web sites. But consumers who visit those sites can't see the ads because they have been placed on invisible Web pages.

In one example, visitors to a site called MyToursInfo.com saw an ordinary-looking Web page with one ad for Verizon Communications and another for a weight-loss product. But, Mr. Edelman, who studied the site in January, said software code running behind the scenes opened more than 40 Web pages, each including three ads from marketers such as Domino's Pizza and Capital One, which were invisible to visitors.

Mr. Edelman's analysis of the code was confirmed by computer-security experts at Symantec and McAfee as well as online-ad advisory firms DoubleVerify and Anchor Intelligence.'

Sweet. I'm not sure what's worse, these and other companies being cheated out of ad dollars by this latest wrinkle in fraud, or us waiting while these invisible pages load. Not only do we suffer through interminable Flash loads, every geegaw Web trick to tickle our eyeballs and/or ears, but we now can be pretty sure that some of those sites that take so ^*%^ long to load are actually loading up page after page of 'invisible' ads.

I'm shocked, SHOCKED! Ad fraud, right under our noses, on the Internet? Oh my..."
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The Empire Strikes Back: Broadcast's end run?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 writes "Is this Television's big step past Cable? USA Today quotes John Eck, President of NBC Network and Media Works:

"If we play it right, it can be a compelling service"

Indeed, if several manufacturers follow suit and build mobile receivers, as LG, Samsung, Zenith, Kenwood, and others disclosed at CES in Las Vegas, this would offer viewers an option to cable, and even to Internet services such as Hulu, among others. Might even impact Youtube...

By offering local news, which normally isn't available from cellphone video services, they could leverage their fading brands even more, and most importantly directly to their audience. And probably preserve advertising views as well, which gives them an advantage with advertisers who pretty much despise Tivo and other services that let viewers bypass ads and get to the good stuff.

From the USA Today story: "At least 63 stations in 22 cities — including New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston and Washington — will transmit news, entertainment and sports to portable devices this year, according to the broadcast industry's Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC).

The initial group will include affiliates of ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, CW, ION and PBS. Each city will have a different mix. Most will simulcast regularly scheduled shows."

Gotta love it. Broadcast TV joining forces with the cellphone industry to take on a common enemy: Cable, which has been intruding on Telephony's turf with VOIP services, and clearly would love to dominate IP Television, may have a foe that can actually hurt them where it counts; in the wallet.

Do we consumers get anything out of this? 'Free' (as in beer) TV, albeit on smaller, mobile screens? On-demand shows? (I doubt that). Local stations on our phones or whatever little device? Smaller pictures of Jennifer Aniston? Is this a good thing?"

Link to Original Source
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Reporters at Black Hat get bounced for hacking

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So some reporters at Black Hat decided to teach the other reporters in the press room about the importance of securing their connections. They must have been thinking "hmm.. this is Black Hat, so why not hack their ids and passords and stuff, and show them how pwned they are, right?".

Not so funny. At Black Hat, hacking is encouraged. Everywhere except the Press Room, apparently.

So the reporters, from the French magazine 'Global Security Magazine', apparently did the unthinkable — hack at Black Hat:

"The French journalists — identified by organizers as Dominique Jouniot, Marc Brami, Mauro Israel — apparently set up their own server to siphon off traffic passing through the media room's central router."

Once again, hacking is cool. Unless, of course, it's done at you, or where you don't want it to be done.

Right back at ya, Black Hat."

Link to Original Source
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Gold Digger or opportunist? Sexist or pragmatist?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rickb928 writes "When this story" on my company's internal blog, I had to go read the original. Yep, allegedly a woman posted a personal ad on Craigslist asking how to meet her 'Sugar Daddy' move to New York City, and basically cash in. And this is a reposting of the ad and a response.

Some of this may or may not be true — and that's not my point. But this gets me thinking. And wondering. Among other things;

Was there a line crossed in this posting and response? I mean, the obvious observations in the NYT article include the blatant sexism by both the woman and the responder, and while many will complain that his (and I assume it was a 'he') response was throughly sexist, wasn't it also honest, brutally so? And what about the woman posting? While she's honest, she's probably smart to be anonymous as well. Posting her photo would not make her gym visits bearable, I bet.

What was the most outrageous thing you have read in a personal ad? I read plenty when I was dating, and the ones pointing out that Republicans, ex-military, etc. need not apply always got my attention. And I got plenty angry until I realized that it was for the best that I avoided these women. And many men used the dating sites to troll for sex, pure and simple, and would post ANYTHING to get a meeting. After all, you can't make the sale unless you can meet the buyer. (Was THAT crossing the line?).

But more to the point, it's not about whether or not a woman can seek marriage to a 'rich guy' for no other reason than to be taken care of, or a 'rich guy' to marry a woman for no other reason than to have a pretty girl on his arm and in his bed. It's deeper than that, I think. How can you really know what your fiance really has on their mind? Rich guys, do you wonder about this? And beautiful women, do you also wonder if the attraction really isn't just skin deep?

Of course, does this matter a bit to your average Slashdot reader? Let's find out."

Link to Original Source
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rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

rickb928 writes "Just when you thought it was bad to talk on your cell phone all the time, comes this story about the amount of cell phone affecting your sperm count and quality. And it's all about the quality, isn't it?

The premise is that men who talk on their cell phones for more than 4 hours a day have lousy sperm.

Of course, the first question I have for the researchers is, 'Dude. The phone is out of my pocket. It's in my ear. I'm not a dickhead".

Whatcha think? Hidden danger or the funniest thing since, well, since tighty-whiteys?



-rick"

Journals

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Redesign

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

There's a reason Slashdot doesn't redesign the site very often. Same reason I dont lick the stove when its hot.

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