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Comments

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Obama Administration Argues For Backdoors In Personal Electronics

rickb928 Re: No, it is not. (443 comments)

There are two factors at work here, I think:
1. Smartphones, the internet, and surveillance technology make it possible to gather enormous amounts of data on each and every one of us. Because it is possible, law enforcement feels compelled to do so, with or without permission or authority. We must both hold LE accountable for their illegal activities, and also specifically restrict and prevent them from engaging in activities we either do not want them to, or we believe they are constitutionally prohibited from

2. Our government, especially federal government, is actively expanding its influence and control. This must be resisted and prevented, despite the attraction of alleged social benefit, the siren song of 'the children', and the promise that this is for 'our good'. This is the real fight. Government will tell is anything to get control. We are now, whether we want to believe it or not, in a conflict with our federal government. They want to overstep the constitution. If we do not prevent this, we will lose all of those protections.

1 hour ago
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Obama Administration Argues For Backdoors In Personal Electronics

rickb928 No, it is not. (443 comments)

“It is fully possible to permit law enforcement to do its job while still adequately protecting personal privacy,”

It is if we are permitted to keep our own information secret from law enforcement except when compelled to deliver it by warrant.

As if regular examples of law enforcement taking advantage of their access to data to spy on current and ex-spouses,boy/girlfriends, family, etc aren't enough of a warning to say NO to this, the fact that they wish to have the Fourth and Fifth Amendments circumvented in law should be enough to deny this.

We must say no.

9 hours ago
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Obama Administration Argues For Backdoors In Personal Electronics

rickb928 Re:Update to Godwin's law? (443 comments)

"They want it to be illegal for you to have information they can't readily get."

THIS.

9 hours ago
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Are the World's Religions Ready For ET?

rickb928 Re:Paging Arthur C. Clarke... (488 comments)

Oh,dear, excepting that angels and such are extraterrestrial....

yesterday
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Are the World's Religions Ready For ET?

rickb928 Re:Paging Arthur C. Clarke... (488 comments)

Christian theology is mute on the subject of extraterrestrial life. I personally believe that if ET comes, we have to accept extraterrestrial life for what it is.

yesterday
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Are the World's Religions Ready For ET?

rickb928 Re:ET would disprove God (488 comments)

When you reconcile your concept of Christianity with the common convention within the faith that God is creator of all, and the appearance of superior aliens would necessarily be His creation, and therefore real and acceptable, then you'll abandon your concept and accept what is Christianity.

If aliens come, Christians will accept them as God's creation. Even if they are Satan's tools, they are God's creation. We'll probably preach the Gospel to them. That;s what we should do, and invite them to dinner.

yesterday
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Medical Records Worth More To Hackers Than Credit Cards

rickb928 Government ineptitude (78 comments)

If Medicare practiced fraud/risk control energy marginally as will as the payments industry, they could cut fraudulent claims by 70%.

- Does the zip code you are shipping durable equipment to when remotely match the patient's residence? If not, just a phone call might work to confirm the transaction.

- Does the durable equipment have use for any Diagnostic code used my the patient in past?

There are other triggers that could help.

2 days ago
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Medical Records Worth More To Hackers Than Credit Cards

rickb928 Re: It will if it's pre-OS X (78 comments)

The NetWare servers I worked with for Navy use similarly had humorless Marine guards between them and you. Wrong badge, wrong response. Bang.

Reasonably secure. That and the air gap measured in kilometers.

2 days ago
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Physicists Find Clue as To Why the DNA Double Helix Twists To the Right

rickb928 Re: Man oh man (120 comments)

Putting money in your pocket is so 90s. That is doing it wrong.

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

rickb928 Repeating previous advice, network! (471 comments)

1 - Contact your university's career placement office. Get real chummy with them. Be very, very polite. they want you to get a good job, so you can afford to donate to the alumni associations.

2 - Contact your alumni associations, all of them. Get really, really chummy with them, until they realize you aren't donating any time soon. You want to go to events, meet fellow graduates that have been out there for a while and have opportunities, and you want them to remember you favorably.

3 - Find professional associations and get involved. Near first,then further away. Again, be real chummy, be a good guy, keep it simple, and admit you are looking for opportunities. NOT WORK. NOT A JOB. an OPPORTUNITY. New terminology.

4 - Find a job club in your area, possibly at the local Job Service or Employment Security office. You will be slumming with healthcare workers, salesmen, and laid-off union workers. They will teach you things you do not know, like how to actually write a resume, make an elevator speech, and interview.

5 - Above all, stay active, exercise, eat well, sleep. Keep yourself in shape, mentally and physically, to nail the next interview and hit the ground running.

Now, about that interview question. Me, I would have responded with "Wow, it's been a long time since freshman Computer Science, but let me see... I remember vector, pair, list, gee, I had to use valarray for a test, but it's been a while since I had to recite those. I've spent more time in {fill in your favorite high-level language here, unless it's VB6} for the past two years, but C is something like riding a bicycle. I don't remember every trick, but I can code whatever I need to, even if it means looking something up to jog my memory and get past a problem. What sort of C++ or C# work do you do here?"

Take the question, demonstrate familiarity with the subject, a partial answer with acknowledgment that you are not a walking encyclopedia, and then turn it around and ask about the apparent basis for the question - do they need a C++ guy, are they just scared you slept through that class, and can you both think on your feet and are interested in the requirements, how you will fit in, what's the real criteria here?

There are only three questions to be asked: Can you do the job? Will you do the job? And will you fit in?

Have ready answers to those.

about a week ago
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US Revamping Its Nuclear Arsenal

rickb928 Re:"imperialist Russia" (341 comments)

The Soviet Union (USSR) included Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belorussia (now Belarus), Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kirgiziya (now Kyrgyzstan), Latvia, Lithuania, Moldavia (now Moldova), Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. Its sphere of influence, the Warsaw Pact nations (the Iron Curtain), included Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungry, Bulgaria, East Germany, Romania, Albania and Yugoslavia.

The USSR's influence extend well beyond these nations, to North (and now South) Vietnam, North Korea, various Central and Latin American nations.

This extended Russia's 'borders' greatly.

Claiming the U.S. was a uniquely global empire from the 50s to the 80s is disingenuous. Even now, I'n not sure we can claim a global empire, whether by design or incompetence being a question for the scholars.

about two weeks ago
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US Revamping Its Nuclear Arsenal

rickb928 Re:MAD (341 comments)

Our real nuclear threat is that someone either 1) demonstrably not entirely sane, or 2) with little to lose, will gain control of a working nuclear weapon and deploy it. IT doesn't matter where.

And there are lots of slightly insane actors on the global stage who give us the very clear impression that they would absolutely do this. There need be only one.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is iOS 8 a Pig?

rickb928 Re: Alright smart guy (504 comments)

Perhaps you should have let them install. The G1went to 1.6 (donut), and it had so little RAM that was the end unless you for it and went with a custom ROM.

My Sensation went from 2.2.3 to 4.0, and can go to 4.4.4 with root and custom ROMs.

What do you want?

about two weeks ago
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Emails Cast Unflattering Light On Internal Politics of Healthcare.gov Rollout

rickb928 Re: This is supposed to be the *WAY* they do thei (392 comments)

I didn't say that SCOTUS did find ACA unconstitutional. They could it, among other things, permitted as a 'tax'.

My complaint is that I believe it is unconstitutional. Yes, I believe most of SCOTUS got it wrong.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is iOS 8 a Pig?

rickb928 Re: Alright smart guy (504 comments)

My G1 got a ton of updates, because Android was young and naive.

My Sensation 4G got one good update, because Android was more mature, and didn't give it away so easily.

My HTC ONE M7 is getting updates, with update to Android L scheduled, because HTC seems to consider updates a competitive advantage. And because it still meets the specs.

Phones that are not strong enough should not get updates. You have to buy more to get more, and that costs $$$.

Stop buying cheap stuff if you want it to last.

about two weeks ago
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Emails Cast Unflattering Light On Internal Politics of Healthcare.gov Rollout

rickb928 Re: This is supposed to be the *WAY* they do their (392 comments)

Romneycare is not Obamacare. State solutions would be entirely acceptable to Republicans, since state have substantial powers under our Constitution. Article 10.

My first objection to the ACA is that it is unconstitutional. States have regulated insurance of all types, and the federal government even administers Medicaid on a state level.

Comparing the U.S. to other nations should be an exercise in misdiagnosis. States have seen their powers and authority diminished, in return for federal money and diminished responsibility. The cost of this is central control and failed programs. Has the ACA improved healthcare access in America in measurable way? Really?

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Cox Coaster, life in the frustrating lane

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So, I've become a participant in the Cox Coaster trial here in the Phoenix area, and I'm wondering if any of you have had a shot at this elsewhere, or if you have some questions about it.

Coaster is Cox's IPTV offering, still being built and tested apparently. As part of the deal, I got a new Cisco router/firewall/wifi hub, the Coaster PC, HDMI cable, and TWO remotes.

And so far, it is an unrewarding experience, but I'm not done trying it out. Verdict pending.

Questions?"

Link to Original Source
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We're the governent, and we're here to secure you

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So the Pentagon, with their shiny new CyberCom commander and all that, are trying to convince corporate CEOs and "companies that operate critical infrastructures" to let them install monitoring systems on their networks or, quote, "stay in the wild wild west of the unprotected internet".

From the article:

"Defense Deputy Secretary William Lynn III, speaking at the Strategic Command Cyber Symposium in Nebraska, said we need to think imaginatively about how to use the National Security Agencyââs Einstein monitoring systems on critical private-sector networks ââ such as those in the financial, utility and communication industries ââ in order to protect us."

Sure sounds good to me. Let the Pentagon keep an eye on your critical network, and they will not only alert you to something going wrong, but they'll even respond to the threat. And if you operate 'critical infrastructure'. you owe it to our nation to opt-in, right? I mean. What could go wrong? It's the Pentagon, surely they know what they're doing, right?"

Link to Original Source
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Hidden web ads inflate revenues, don't annoy us

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "Well, sort of...

The Wall Street Journal publishes here (Same story, who stole what???) and here:

'Kraft Foods, Greyhound Lines and Capital One Financial have bought some strange ads on the Internet lately. What's so strange about them is that they're invisible.

The companies might not have known about their invisible display ads — the kind that are supposed to appear alongside content on Web pages — if not for Ben Edelman, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School who studies Internet advertising.

Mr. Edelman says his research shows that all three marketers, and many others, have fallen victim to Web sites that use such ads as a way to sell more ad space than they have.

The Web sites can get away with it, he says, because online advertisers don't always audit their campaigns for proof their ads are appearing. It isn't clear how common these ads are or how much they cost marketers.

Mr. Edelman and other Internet-security experts say the ads are created with the use of computer code that makes it look to marketers as though their ads are showing up on legitimate Web sites. But consumers who visit those sites can't see the ads because they have been placed on invisible Web pages.

In one example, visitors to a site called MyToursInfo.com saw an ordinary-looking Web page with one ad for Verizon Communications and another for a weight-loss product. But, Mr. Edelman, who studied the site in January, said software code running behind the scenes opened more than 40 Web pages, each including three ads from marketers such as Domino's Pizza and Capital One, which were invisible to visitors.

Mr. Edelman's analysis of the code was confirmed by computer-security experts at Symantec and McAfee as well as online-ad advisory firms DoubleVerify and Anchor Intelligence.'

Sweet. I'm not sure what's worse, these and other companies being cheated out of ad dollars by this latest wrinkle in fraud, or us waiting while these invisible pages load. Not only do we suffer through interminable Flash loads, every geegaw Web trick to tickle our eyeballs and/or ears, but we now can be pretty sure that some of those sites that take so ^*%^ long to load are actually loading up page after page of 'invisible' ads.

I'm shocked, SHOCKED! Ad fraud, right under our noses, on the Internet? Oh my..."
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The Empire Strikes Back: Broadcast's end run?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 writes "Is this Television's big step past Cable? USA Today quotes John Eck, President of NBC Network and Media Works:

"If we play it right, it can be a compelling service"

Indeed, if several manufacturers follow suit and build mobile receivers, as LG, Samsung, Zenith, Kenwood, and others disclosed at CES in Las Vegas, this would offer viewers an option to cable, and even to Internet services such as Hulu, among others. Might even impact Youtube...

By offering local news, which normally isn't available from cellphone video services, they could leverage their fading brands even more, and most importantly directly to their audience. And probably preserve advertising views as well, which gives them an advantage with advertisers who pretty much despise Tivo and other services that let viewers bypass ads and get to the good stuff.

From the USA Today story: "At least 63 stations in 22 cities — including New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston and Washington — will transmit news, entertainment and sports to portable devices this year, according to the broadcast industry's Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC).

The initial group will include affiliates of ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, CW, ION and PBS. Each city will have a different mix. Most will simulcast regularly scheduled shows."

Gotta love it. Broadcast TV joining forces with the cellphone industry to take on a common enemy: Cable, which has been intruding on Telephony's turf with VOIP services, and clearly would love to dominate IP Television, may have a foe that can actually hurt them where it counts; in the wallet.

Do we consumers get anything out of this? 'Free' (as in beer) TV, albeit on smaller, mobile screens? On-demand shows? (I doubt that). Local stations on our phones or whatever little device? Smaller pictures of Jennifer Aniston? Is this a good thing?"

Link to Original Source
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Reporters at Black Hat get bounced for hacking

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So some reporters at Black Hat decided to teach the other reporters in the press room about the importance of securing their connections. They must have been thinking "hmm.. this is Black Hat, so why not hack their ids and passords and stuff, and show them how pwned they are, right?".

Not so funny. At Black Hat, hacking is encouraged. Everywhere except the Press Room, apparently.

So the reporters, from the French magazine 'Global Security Magazine', apparently did the unthinkable — hack at Black Hat:

"The French journalists — identified by organizers as Dominique Jouniot, Marc Brami, Mauro Israel — apparently set up their own server to siphon off traffic passing through the media room's central router."

Once again, hacking is cool. Unless, of course, it's done at you, or where you don't want it to be done.

Right back at ya, Black Hat."

Link to Original Source
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Gold Digger or opportunist? Sexist or pragmatist?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rickb928 writes "When this story" on my company's internal blog, I had to go read the original. Yep, allegedly a woman posted a personal ad on Craigslist asking how to meet her 'Sugar Daddy' move to New York City, and basically cash in. And this is a reposting of the ad and a response.

Some of this may or may not be true — and that's not my point. But this gets me thinking. And wondering. Among other things;

Was there a line crossed in this posting and response? I mean, the obvious observations in the NYT article include the blatant sexism by both the woman and the responder, and while many will complain that his (and I assume it was a 'he') response was throughly sexist, wasn't it also honest, brutally so? And what about the woman posting? While she's honest, she's probably smart to be anonymous as well. Posting her photo would not make her gym visits bearable, I bet.

What was the most outrageous thing you have read in a personal ad? I read plenty when I was dating, and the ones pointing out that Republicans, ex-military, etc. need not apply always got my attention. And I got plenty angry until I realized that it was for the best that I avoided these women. And many men used the dating sites to troll for sex, pure and simple, and would post ANYTHING to get a meeting. After all, you can't make the sale unless you can meet the buyer. (Was THAT crossing the line?).

But more to the point, it's not about whether or not a woman can seek marriage to a 'rich guy' for no other reason than to be taken care of, or a 'rich guy' to marry a woman for no other reason than to have a pretty girl on his arm and in his bed. It's deeper than that, I think. How can you really know what your fiance really has on their mind? Rich guys, do you wonder about this? And beautiful women, do you also wonder if the attraction really isn't just skin deep?

Of course, does this matter a bit to your average Slashdot reader? Let's find out."

Link to Original Source
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rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rickb928 writes "Just when you thought it was bad to talk on your cell phone all the time, comes this story about the amount of cell phone affecting your sperm count and quality. And it's all about the quality, isn't it?

The premise is that men who talk on their cell phones for more than 4 hours a day have lousy sperm.

Of course, the first question I have for the researchers is, 'Dude. The phone is out of my pocket. It's in my ear. I'm not a dickhead".

Whatcha think? Hidden danger or the funniest thing since, well, since tighty-whiteys?



-rick"

Journals

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Redesign

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

There's a reason Slashdot doesn't redesign the site very often. Same reason I dont lick the stove when its hot.

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