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Comments

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Developing the First Law of Robotics

rickb928 obvious error (153 comments)

The article misstated First Law. Get that right first.

yesterday
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US Patent Office Seeking Consultant That Can Stamp Out Fraud By Patent Examiners

rickb928 Re: This is not a new or unique problem (124 comments)

I'm pretty sure it doesn't matter what number, if any, the authors of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights had in mind. Change the rules in some fair, neutral eau of that dem the right way to do it, but arbitrary limits are stupid.

2 days ago
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Indian Mars Mission Has Completed 95% of Its Journey Without a Hitch

rickb928 Re: DESI Is the SUPREME RACE! (113 comments)

Clothing suitable for Gurgaon may not be suitable for Minneapolis. Especially in winter.

I, however, would love to be able to buy Allen Solly in the US.

2 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

rickb928 Re: it's means it is (132 comments)

Um, bad post. I meant that neither Local Motors nor anything associated with it are Luddite.

Now let me reboot this frikin N7. Stupid touch problems.

2 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

rickb928 Re: it's means it is (132 comments)

Local Motors and nothing associated with it are Luddite.

2 days ago
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US Patent Office Seeking Consultant That Can Stamp Out Fraud By Patent Examiners

rickb928 Re: This is not a new or unique problem (124 comments)

I was responding to a proposal that cars be rejected outright, arbitrarily, and let the courts act as a filter to vet those, which would, to me, turn the court into a preliminary examiner. Such a waste, as the court should decide that that PTO ess negligent in merely refusing to accept applications dur to workload.

And that would be negligent, and is. The PTO should perhaps work on streamlining the work, maybe automating the intake and initial comparison of applications to both competing and existing patents, and even developing specialists to more quickly identifying problems and making decisions.

2 days ago
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US Patent Office Seeking Consultant That Can Stamp Out Fraud By Patent Examiners

rickb928 Re: This is not a new or unique problem (124 comments)

So the answer your propose is to arbitrarily limit demand. I would expect many rejected applicants to be on court with valid complaints that their application was never considered on its merits, as should be expected by law. You shift the work from the PTO to the courts. Stupid.

3 days ago
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US Patent Office Seeking Consultant That Can Stamp Out Fraud By Patent Examiners

rickb928 This is not a new or unique problem (124 comments)

Though it is complicated by the government service issue, there are ways to measure performance...

- Salt the case load with fictitious, bogus applications intended to be declined. In fact, this can both detect work that is disingenuous, and start applying some quality checks. Applications that are so flawed as to be obvious can be expected to fall through as approved if examiners are just phoning it in.

- Break up the review process, no insight into the next step for any examiner. At some point, some examiners will be doing too little work to keep up, or the backlog will inspire some investigation. Perhaps.

- This is an oldie. Full tracking of the examiner's work, down to the keystroke.

- Even older, time to put up the performance chart. Peer pressure will probably not work in Civil Service, but it's a valiant try nonetheless.

Now, the real trick is how to measure performance. That scares me.

3 days ago
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Justice Sotomayor Warns Against Tech-Enabled "Orwellian" World

rickb928 Re:Horse, meet barn door... (163 comments)

Same problem with 3d-printed firearms. It was fine and good to let you make your own into it even seems like or might be possible for just the technically adept minority of citizens. Now, not so much does the government think making your own gun is a good idea.

Restricting access to files describing functional designs is much like restricting access to books describing more traditional methods of gunsmithing.

3 days ago
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Turning the Tables On "Phone Tech Support" Scammers

rickb928 Re: External IP (208 comments)

It's not the DDOS. It's the login attempts, probes. You know all this. Relentless attacks. They even try to raise an SMTP or SNMP server. Stupid, but the scripts run forevet without attention, so this is the new normal.

Used to be you could put up a naked host and count the time to compromise on hours. Can one last a minute today?

4 days ago
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German Court: Google Must Stop Ignoring Customer E-mails

rickb928 Re: well done mods. (288 comments)

Our VB6 software works a hell of a lot better than our .NET software. And the .NET developers had the VB6 source code to paw through and get some insight into how to do what they were asked to.

Yes, it is the developers. We paid them to learn .NET, and to make a replacement for the VB6 app. They failed to replace the app successfully, but they apparently did learn .NET so they are going to Cooperstown. Not so nice for us.

5 days ago
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Turning the Tables On "Phone Tech Support" Scammers

rickb928 Re:External IP (208 comments)

Goatpot.

5 days ago
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Turning the Tables On "Phone Tech Support" Scammers

rickb928 Re:External IP (208 comments)

It seems like the entire internet IS ALREADY ATTACKING MY ROUTERS.

What's one more lame scammer gonna do that isn't already being tried every 20ms or so?

Oh, and my external IP at home is dynamic, but the lease is tenacious. I would need to wait a while to get it to change. Like a week.

5 days ago
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Banks Report Credit Card Breach At Home Depot

rickb928 Re: Chip and PIN (132 comments)

It's doubtful that offline mode could be enabled in firmware, certainly not without some serious work. But shimming the terminal 1. Intercepts the chip data stream, 2. Triggers an apparent non chip card insertion, 3. Captures the chip data and if the cracker is good, acts like a terminal and decodes data, 4. Sends stripe data as expected, 5. Terminal received the auth and is happy happy happy.

The shim stands in to intercept the chip data, fill the terminal intro accepting the card as a mag stripe, and doors leave the chip unsynched, which will either kill the chip or force a re sync and raise some innocuous alarms. Ask we care about if that it is possible to circumvent the chip.

IF the terminal permits swipe insertions. Many in EU will not, but if the cracker has modified the terminal firmware, all is lost. That is generally very difficult, checksums and signing and all that.

about two weeks ago
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Banks Report Credit Card Breach At Home Depot

rickb928 Re: Chip and PIN (132 comments)

That's as easy as it gets.

about two weeks ago
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Banks Report Credit Card Breach At Home Depot

rickb928 Re:Awesome (132 comments)

If they change mine, it will be the second this year, fourth in two years, sixth or seventh in 3 years. Credit unions don't all own their card systems, and these issuers are lazy.

Some card issuers know that 40-60% of their cards in force are 'compromised'. They consider that normal, and perform fraud/risk monitoring as a normal course of business.

about two weeks ago
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Banks Report Credit Card Breach At Home Depot

rickb928 Re:Instead of naming stores (132 comments)

It's not NCR, IBM, etc. It's Ingentico, Verifone, the other terminal makers, and the acquirers (Paymentech, First Data, etc) that handle the data, but Home Depot needs to secure the transmission of that. And I bet most of this was skimmed off of databases that needed to be another layer away from intruders.

There is no such thing as absolute security.

about two weeks ago
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Banks Report Credit Card Breach At Home Depot

rickb928 Re: Chip and PIN (132 comments)

And in the UK, the stories of pensioners being shoulder-surfed at the ATM (or worse) while they peck away at the keypad end with them at the bank being informed that their money is gone, and they must have disclosed their PIN to someone. "Sorry, but the system is totally secure. It isn't our fault". Not as if the camera at the ATM wouldn't be showing some hoodie emptying their account, though the banks have no real incentive to investigate.

Yeah, Chip n PIN is a real winner, for the banks.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Cox Coaster, life in the frustrating lane

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So, I've become a participant in the Cox Coaster trial here in the Phoenix area, and I'm wondering if any of you have had a shot at this elsewhere, or if you have some questions about it.

Coaster is Cox's IPTV offering, still being built and tested apparently. As part of the deal, I got a new Cisco router/firewall/wifi hub, the Coaster PC, HDMI cable, and TWO remotes.

And so far, it is an unrewarding experience, but I'm not done trying it out. Verdict pending.

Questions?"

Link to Original Source
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We're the governent, and we're here to secure you

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So the Pentagon, with their shiny new CyberCom commander and all that, are trying to convince corporate CEOs and "companies that operate critical infrastructures" to let them install monitoring systems on their networks or, quote, "stay in the wild wild west of the unprotected internet".

From the article:

"Defense Deputy Secretary William Lynn III, speaking at the Strategic Command Cyber Symposium in Nebraska, said we need to think imaginatively about how to use the National Security Agencyââs Einstein monitoring systems on critical private-sector networks ââ such as those in the financial, utility and communication industries ââ in order to protect us."

Sure sounds good to me. Let the Pentagon keep an eye on your critical network, and they will not only alert you to something going wrong, but they'll even respond to the threat. And if you operate 'critical infrastructure'. you owe it to our nation to opt-in, right? I mean. What could go wrong? It's the Pentagon, surely they know what they're doing, right?"

Link to Original Source
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Hidden web ads inflate revenues, don't annoy us

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "Well, sort of...

The Wall Street Journal publishes here (Same story, who stole what???) and here:

'Kraft Foods, Greyhound Lines and Capital One Financial have bought some strange ads on the Internet lately. What's so strange about them is that they're invisible.

The companies might not have known about their invisible display ads — the kind that are supposed to appear alongside content on Web pages — if not for Ben Edelman, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School who studies Internet advertising.

Mr. Edelman says his research shows that all three marketers, and many others, have fallen victim to Web sites that use such ads as a way to sell more ad space than they have.

The Web sites can get away with it, he says, because online advertisers don't always audit their campaigns for proof their ads are appearing. It isn't clear how common these ads are or how much they cost marketers.

Mr. Edelman and other Internet-security experts say the ads are created with the use of computer code that makes it look to marketers as though their ads are showing up on legitimate Web sites. But consumers who visit those sites can't see the ads because they have been placed on invisible Web pages.

In one example, visitors to a site called MyToursInfo.com saw an ordinary-looking Web page with one ad for Verizon Communications and another for a weight-loss product. But, Mr. Edelman, who studied the site in January, said software code running behind the scenes opened more than 40 Web pages, each including three ads from marketers such as Domino's Pizza and Capital One, which were invisible to visitors.

Mr. Edelman's analysis of the code was confirmed by computer-security experts at Symantec and McAfee as well as online-ad advisory firms DoubleVerify and Anchor Intelligence.'

Sweet. I'm not sure what's worse, these and other companies being cheated out of ad dollars by this latest wrinkle in fraud, or us waiting while these invisible pages load. Not only do we suffer through interminable Flash loads, every geegaw Web trick to tickle our eyeballs and/or ears, but we now can be pretty sure that some of those sites that take so ^*%^ long to load are actually loading up page after page of 'invisible' ads.

I'm shocked, SHOCKED! Ad fraud, right under our noses, on the Internet? Oh my..."
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The Empire Strikes Back: Broadcast's end run?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 writes "Is this Television's big step past Cable? USA Today quotes John Eck, President of NBC Network and Media Works:

"If we play it right, it can be a compelling service"

Indeed, if several manufacturers follow suit and build mobile receivers, as LG, Samsung, Zenith, Kenwood, and others disclosed at CES in Las Vegas, this would offer viewers an option to cable, and even to Internet services such as Hulu, among others. Might even impact Youtube...

By offering local news, which normally isn't available from cellphone video services, they could leverage their fading brands even more, and most importantly directly to their audience. And probably preserve advertising views as well, which gives them an advantage with advertisers who pretty much despise Tivo and other services that let viewers bypass ads and get to the good stuff.

From the USA Today story: "At least 63 stations in 22 cities — including New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston and Washington — will transmit news, entertainment and sports to portable devices this year, according to the broadcast industry's Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC).

The initial group will include affiliates of ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, CW, ION and PBS. Each city will have a different mix. Most will simulcast regularly scheduled shows."

Gotta love it. Broadcast TV joining forces with the cellphone industry to take on a common enemy: Cable, which has been intruding on Telephony's turf with VOIP services, and clearly would love to dominate IP Television, may have a foe that can actually hurt them where it counts; in the wallet.

Do we consumers get anything out of this? 'Free' (as in beer) TV, albeit on smaller, mobile screens? On-demand shows? (I doubt that). Local stations on our phones or whatever little device? Smaller pictures of Jennifer Aniston? Is this a good thing?"

Link to Original Source
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Reporters at Black Hat get bounced for hacking

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So some reporters at Black Hat decided to teach the other reporters in the press room about the importance of securing their connections. They must have been thinking "hmm.. this is Black Hat, so why not hack their ids and passords and stuff, and show them how pwned they are, right?".

Not so funny. At Black Hat, hacking is encouraged. Everywhere except the Press Room, apparently.

So the reporters, from the French magazine 'Global Security Magazine', apparently did the unthinkable — hack at Black Hat:

"The French journalists — identified by organizers as Dominique Jouniot, Marc Brami, Mauro Israel — apparently set up their own server to siphon off traffic passing through the media room's central router."

Once again, hacking is cool. Unless, of course, it's done at you, or where you don't want it to be done.

Right back at ya, Black Hat."

Link to Original Source
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Gold Digger or opportunist? Sexist or pragmatist?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rickb928 writes "When this story" on my company's internal blog, I had to go read the original. Yep, allegedly a woman posted a personal ad on Craigslist asking how to meet her 'Sugar Daddy' move to New York City, and basically cash in. And this is a reposting of the ad and a response.

Some of this may or may not be true — and that's not my point. But this gets me thinking. And wondering. Among other things;

Was there a line crossed in this posting and response? I mean, the obvious observations in the NYT article include the blatant sexism by both the woman and the responder, and while many will complain that his (and I assume it was a 'he') response was throughly sexist, wasn't it also honest, brutally so? And what about the woman posting? While she's honest, she's probably smart to be anonymous as well. Posting her photo would not make her gym visits bearable, I bet.

What was the most outrageous thing you have read in a personal ad? I read plenty when I was dating, and the ones pointing out that Republicans, ex-military, etc. need not apply always got my attention. And I got plenty angry until I realized that it was for the best that I avoided these women. And many men used the dating sites to troll for sex, pure and simple, and would post ANYTHING to get a meeting. After all, you can't make the sale unless you can meet the buyer. (Was THAT crossing the line?).

But more to the point, it's not about whether or not a woman can seek marriage to a 'rich guy' for no other reason than to be taken care of, or a 'rich guy' to marry a woman for no other reason than to have a pretty girl on his arm and in his bed. It's deeper than that, I think. How can you really know what your fiance really has on their mind? Rich guys, do you wonder about this? And beautiful women, do you also wonder if the attraction really isn't just skin deep?

Of course, does this matter a bit to your average Slashdot reader? Let's find out."

Link to Original Source
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rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rickb928 writes "Just when you thought it was bad to talk on your cell phone all the time, comes this story about the amount of cell phone affecting your sperm count and quality. And it's all about the quality, isn't it?

The premise is that men who talk on their cell phones for more than 4 hours a day have lousy sperm.

Of course, the first question I have for the researchers is, 'Dude. The phone is out of my pocket. It's in my ear. I'm not a dickhead".

Whatcha think? Hidden danger or the funniest thing since, well, since tighty-whiteys?



-rick"

Journals

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Redesign

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

There's a reason Slashdot doesn't redesign the site very often. Same reason I dont lick the stove when its hot.

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