Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Wikipedia Blocks 'Disruptive' Edits From US Congress

rickb928 this is bad. (161 comments)

If congressional staff is denied this recreational outlet, they will just find other mischief.

Which can only result in more laws and more spending

2 days ago
top

Microsoft's CEO Says He Wants to Unify Windows

rickb928 Re: Best Wishes ! (321 comments)

Really. My 5" phone behaves differently than my 7" tablet, and the UI adapts.

Unified UI from 4" phones to 24" all-in-ones? Why?

A unified kernel, that might be fun.

4 days ago
top

Dealing With 'Advertising Pollution'

rickb928 equally annoying, (394 comments)

The sites that restart my autoplay preferences constantly. ESPN does this, and others.

about a week ago
top

Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

rickb928 Re:Who couldn't see this coming? (300 comments)

Fat Lou did clean house.

A lot of those execs founded their own ventures, and a lot of them bought IBM stuff.

Of course, he also let go a lot of people who did nothing. I worked for a man at the time who had to deal with the do nothings, No love lost when they were gone.

about two weeks ago
top

Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

rickb928 Re:Who couldn't see this coming? (300 comments)

FWIW...

I work for a S&P 500 financial corporation. I've been here through multiple major layoffs, one a 10% global layoff, the other a 20% global layoff. One in response to the unpleasantness in 2008-9, the other in response to business decisions to refocus and drive growth by investing in new markets and new products, necessitating divesting and letting a lot of good people go that simply did not do what was needed at the time.

It's a familiar and trite complaint that layoffs serve the C-level exclusively, but I can easily see Microsoft choosing to remove distractions, reduce current expenses, and even take the opportunity to shake the tree and rid itself of (real or imagined) low-hanging underperformers.

IBM did this repeatedly, and is still doing it, as large corporations regularly have to sift their work force and reset priorities, UNLESS they are consistently evaluating their strategies, have truly strategic planning that looks beyond the horizon, and work from a position of true knowledge of their business and performance. Microsoft is regularly accused of failed strategy and poor performance. And they can certainly be accused of being too big to be well managed, especially in the eyes of the minions who live with the decisions.

Microsoft's market(s) is(are) difficult places to predict performance. Intangibles rule in that space, and failure is the norm. Success if fleeting. Windows is Microsoft's bedrock, so as the marketplace starts to embrace nontraditional devices that need not use Windows, Microsoft should be looking beyond traditional and on to emerging opportunities. Can they move quickly enough to outflank competitors? Google is huge, but acts like a startup on specific projects. From my viewpoint, Kinect is the last Microsoft project that could be described as nimble. There are some interesting things they show off, but none yet ready for a product. Surface is just not floating anyone's boat yet. Nokia was dead on arrival, so losing that is admitting they could not resuscitate it with Windows Phone, the poster child for losing the traditional to the nontraditional. Ask me some time about my new set top box, running Microsoft Mediaroom, and closed captioning. At least Microsoft left this in marginally perfect state, but another idea they had to abandon.

Harrison's Postulate confirmed. Enjoy.

about two weeks ago
top

Home Depot Begins Retail Store Pilot Program To Sell MakerBot 3-D Printers

rickb928 Re:What's the target audience? (127 comments)

I raised $1800 for my first Turbo XT clone with a yard sale. Dual 5 1/4 floppies, 20MB HD, 8MHz CPU, 640K RAM, CGA baby!

It got updated to 3.5 HD floppies, 40MB drive, then out the door in 2 years and on to 286s, 386SX, blah blah blah. I paid a lot to be bleeding edge right up to Pentium 90s. After that I slowed down, and still run a Core 2 Duo at home that does Windows 8.1 very, very well.

My 3D Printer experiment will be a home made something, probably a GMax clone or similar beam frame kit. I need not pay all that retail, and I may buy a used Printrbot Simple which I see pretty regular. I can always resell it or scavenge parts.

about two weeks ago
top

Home Depot Begins Retail Store Pilot Program To Sell MakerBot 3-D Printers

rickb928 Re:What's the target audience? (127 comments)

GMax. I'm thinking of building a clone.

about two weeks ago
top

FCC Approves Subsidy Plan to Upgrade School and Library Networks

rickb928 Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (70 comments)

Actually my initial response was to an AC, not you.

about two weeks ago
top

FCC Approves Subsidy Plan to Upgrade School and Library Networks

rickb928 Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (70 comments)

No, notion that somehow I disagree that they're monopolies, and that somehow i rationalize against emergence of competition like charter schools. I not only do NOT, but I'm very much interested in alternatives to our failED public school system nationwide.

My comment about unions being corporations was informed by the reality that many unions are effectively subcontractors to trucking, contstruction, technology companies. Teachers unions fit this mold, though they and school systems would probably argue that.

Somehow you seem to think I'm not a lifelong conservative, steeped in capitalism, clinging to the hope that our Nation can somehow leverage our Constitution and sa be out nation from this president. Please reconsider your opinion of me.

about two weeks ago
top

FCC Approves Subsidy Plan to Upgrade School and Library Networks

rickb928 Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (70 comments)

What? You've confused me with some other person you've confused with a real person.

about two weeks ago
top

FCC Approves Subsidy Plan to Upgrade School and Library Networks

rickb928 Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (70 comments)

Here's a concept for yah...

Unions are actually corporations. They have a purpose.

That suffer the same problems as any corporations.

Deal with it.

about two weeks ago
top

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

rickb928 Re: quelle surprise (725 comments)

Apologies for the typos.

about three weeks ago
top

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

rickb928 Re: quelle surprise (725 comments)

I'm not arguing that global warming doesn't exist, nor of it is man made our not. Just asking if the premise that it began in t 30s took into account the dramatic warming of the 30s.

This is what makes this an impossible debate? If you are not lockstep with the AGW faithful, they demonize you as Luddite, ignorant, anti-science, evil.

Take that and stuff it. Reason with me or stop pretending you have science.

My disagreement with you is, in this thread, still hypothetical. At least let me make the statement, please, before you decide if I'm for or against something, k?

about three weeks ago
top

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

rickb928 Re: quelle surprise (725 comments)

Is it unreasonable that claims of warming beginning in the 30s might use data from before, at least the 30s? Certainly from the early 1800s, if not before?

Seriously, is it that hard to discuss this?

about three weeks ago
top

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

rickb928 Re: CAGW is a trojan horse (725 comments)

Seriously? Wow.

Read this carefully, and with an open mind. At least this is an example of the sort is analysis that can lead a skeptic to distrust the scientists trying very hard to prove their hypothesis.

about three weeks ago
top

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

rickb928 Re: Other way around (725 comments)

Can we extend that observation to justify the euthanasia of babies, children, out adults with intellects below a certain threshold? Or does birth convey more rights?

about three weeks ago
top

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

rickb928 Re: quelle surprise (725 comments)

Did these observations and conclusions that warming began in the 40s correct for the warming in the 30s? Remember, Dust Bowl and all?

about three weeks ago
top

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

rickb928 Re:It's Okay (725 comments)

In Europe the socialists can identify and admit their intentions with substantially less backlash Anna ostracization than in America. Here, they mostly must hide their intentions within liberalism.

Mostly.

about three weeks ago
top

Following EU Ruling, BBC Article Excluded From Google Searches

rickb928 Unintended consequences (239 comments)

Perhaps some fine-tuning is in order. If you continue to be a public person, and being a director of a major corporation does qualify yopu as 'public', then perhaps the laws should be more strict. Challenging results for accuracy of the underlying information would be a hugely entertaining process.

about three weeks ago
top

FTC Says T-Mobile Made Hundreds of Millions From Bogus SMS Charges

rickb928 Already obsolete (110 comments)

The FTC is infamous for bring suit even years after the transgressions occurred.

Typical. Not much to see here.

Indeed, from the Complaint:

"Until at least December 2013, T-Mobile has also charged consumers for other services..."

"Until at least December 2013, in addition to charging for phone services offered
by Defendant, Defendant has charged many consumers for other services offered by third-party
merchants. These purported services have included monthly subscriptions for content such as
ringtones, wallpaper, and text messages providing horoscopes, flirting tips, celebrity gossip, and
other similar information (“Third-Party Subscriptions”). Defendant typically has charged
consumers $9.99 per month for such Third-Party Subscriptions. "

No doubt.

"9. In numerous instances, Defendant has charged consumers for Third-Party
Subscriptions that the consumers did not order or authorize, a practice known as cramming.
Defendant has continued to charge consumers for Third-Party Subscriptions even after large
numbers of consumers complained about unauthorized charges. Refund rates for the
subscriptions were high – in some cases as high as 40%. Further, Defendant has continued to
charge consumers for Third-Party Subscriptions even after industry auditor alerts, law
enforcement and other legal actions, and news articles indicated that the third-party merchants
were not obtaining valid authorization from consumers for the charges. "

FTC boilerplate for these sorts of complaints. Every carrier has done this, some repeatedly, over the past few decades.

"11. In television and other advertisements, and during its sales process, Defendant
markets its telephone and data services to consumers. Defendant’s sales representatives often
discuss these services only, and not purported third-party services, with consumers. Defendant’s
contracts make clear and prominent representations about the services it provides; information
about third-party services is buried in lengthy terms and conditions of its service contract.
12. Defendant has not obtained authorization from consumers before charging them
for Third-Party Subscriptions. Instead, the third-party merchants or billing intermediaries
purportedly have obtained authorization. In many cases, however, these third parties have failed
to obtain authorization from consumers."

And indeed, same old boilerplate. Especially the phrase "buried in lengthy terms and conditions of its service contract"

If the FTC would similarly file complaints against any number of corporations that do just this, they would be very very busy indeed.

This is PR for the FTC. You go, boyz!

about a month ago

Submissions

top

Cox Coaster, life in the frustrating lane

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So, I've become a participant in the Cox Coaster trial here in the Phoenix area, and I'm wondering if any of you have had a shot at this elsewhere, or if you have some questions about it.

Coaster is Cox's IPTV offering, still being built and tested apparently. As part of the deal, I got a new Cisco router/firewall/wifi hub, the Coaster PC, HDMI cable, and TWO remotes.

And so far, it is an unrewarding experience, but I'm not done trying it out. Verdict pending.

Questions?"

Link to Original Source
top

We're the governent, and we're here to secure you

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So the Pentagon, with their shiny new CyberCom commander and all that, are trying to convince corporate CEOs and "companies that operate critical infrastructures" to let them install monitoring systems on their networks or, quote, "stay in the wild wild west of the unprotected internet".

From the article:

"Defense Deputy Secretary William Lynn III, speaking at the Strategic Command Cyber Symposium in Nebraska, said we need to think imaginatively about how to use the National Security Agencyââs Einstein monitoring systems on critical private-sector networks ââ such as those in the financial, utility and communication industries ââ in order to protect us."

Sure sounds good to me. Let the Pentagon keep an eye on your critical network, and they will not only alert you to something going wrong, but they'll even respond to the threat. And if you operate 'critical infrastructure'. you owe it to our nation to opt-in, right? I mean. What could go wrong? It's the Pentagon, surely they know what they're doing, right?"

Link to Original Source
top

Hidden web ads inflate revenues, don't annoy us

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "Well, sort of...

The Wall Street Journal publishes here (Same story, who stole what???) and here:

'Kraft Foods, Greyhound Lines and Capital One Financial have bought some strange ads on the Internet lately. What's so strange about them is that they're invisible.

The companies might not have known about their invisible display ads — the kind that are supposed to appear alongside content on Web pages — if not for Ben Edelman, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School who studies Internet advertising.

Mr. Edelman says his research shows that all three marketers, and many others, have fallen victim to Web sites that use such ads as a way to sell more ad space than they have.

The Web sites can get away with it, he says, because online advertisers don't always audit their campaigns for proof their ads are appearing. It isn't clear how common these ads are or how much they cost marketers.

Mr. Edelman and other Internet-security experts say the ads are created with the use of computer code that makes it look to marketers as though their ads are showing up on legitimate Web sites. But consumers who visit those sites can't see the ads because they have been placed on invisible Web pages.

In one example, visitors to a site called MyToursInfo.com saw an ordinary-looking Web page with one ad for Verizon Communications and another for a weight-loss product. But, Mr. Edelman, who studied the site in January, said software code running behind the scenes opened more than 40 Web pages, each including three ads from marketers such as Domino's Pizza and Capital One, which were invisible to visitors.

Mr. Edelman's analysis of the code was confirmed by computer-security experts at Symantec and McAfee as well as online-ad advisory firms DoubleVerify and Anchor Intelligence.'

Sweet. I'm not sure what's worse, these and other companies being cheated out of ad dollars by this latest wrinkle in fraud, or us waiting while these invisible pages load. Not only do we suffer through interminable Flash loads, every geegaw Web trick to tickle our eyeballs and/or ears, but we now can be pretty sure that some of those sites that take so ^*%^ long to load are actually loading up page after page of 'invisible' ads.

I'm shocked, SHOCKED! Ad fraud, right under our noses, on the Internet? Oh my..."
top

The Empire Strikes Back: Broadcast's end run?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 writes "Is this Television's big step past Cable? USA Today quotes John Eck, President of NBC Network and Media Works:

"If we play it right, it can be a compelling service"

Indeed, if several manufacturers follow suit and build mobile receivers, as LG, Samsung, Zenith, Kenwood, and others disclosed at CES in Las Vegas, this would offer viewers an option to cable, and even to Internet services such as Hulu, among others. Might even impact Youtube...

By offering local news, which normally isn't available from cellphone video services, they could leverage their fading brands even more, and most importantly directly to their audience. And probably preserve advertising views as well, which gives them an advantage with advertisers who pretty much despise Tivo and other services that let viewers bypass ads and get to the good stuff.

From the USA Today story: "At least 63 stations in 22 cities — including New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston and Washington — will transmit news, entertainment and sports to portable devices this year, according to the broadcast industry's Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC).

The initial group will include affiliates of ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, CW, ION and PBS. Each city will have a different mix. Most will simulcast regularly scheduled shows."

Gotta love it. Broadcast TV joining forces with the cellphone industry to take on a common enemy: Cable, which has been intruding on Telephony's turf with VOIP services, and clearly would love to dominate IP Television, may have a foe that can actually hurt them where it counts; in the wallet.

Do we consumers get anything out of this? 'Free' (as in beer) TV, albeit on smaller, mobile screens? On-demand shows? (I doubt that). Local stations on our phones or whatever little device? Smaller pictures of Jennifer Aniston? Is this a good thing?"

Link to Original Source
top

Reporters at Black Hat get bounced for hacking

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So some reporters at Black Hat decided to teach the other reporters in the press room about the importance of securing their connections. They must have been thinking "hmm.. this is Black Hat, so why not hack their ids and passords and stuff, and show them how pwned they are, right?".

Not so funny. At Black Hat, hacking is encouraged. Everywhere except the Press Room, apparently.

So the reporters, from the French magazine 'Global Security Magazine', apparently did the unthinkable — hack at Black Hat:

"The French journalists — identified by organizers as Dominique Jouniot, Marc Brami, Mauro Israel — apparently set up their own server to siphon off traffic passing through the media room's central router."

Once again, hacking is cool. Unless, of course, it's done at you, or where you don't want it to be done.

Right back at ya, Black Hat."

Link to Original Source
top

Gold Digger or opportunist? Sexist or pragmatist?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rickb928 writes "When this story" on my company's internal blog, I had to go read the original. Yep, allegedly a woman posted a personal ad on Craigslist asking how to meet her 'Sugar Daddy' move to New York City, and basically cash in. And this is a reposting of the ad and a response.

Some of this may or may not be true — and that's not my point. But this gets me thinking. And wondering. Among other things;

Was there a line crossed in this posting and response? I mean, the obvious observations in the NYT article include the blatant sexism by both the woman and the responder, and while many will complain that his (and I assume it was a 'he') response was throughly sexist, wasn't it also honest, brutally so? And what about the woman posting? While she's honest, she's probably smart to be anonymous as well. Posting her photo would not make her gym visits bearable, I bet.

What was the most outrageous thing you have read in a personal ad? I read plenty when I was dating, and the ones pointing out that Republicans, ex-military, etc. need not apply always got my attention. And I got plenty angry until I realized that it was for the best that I avoided these women. And many men used the dating sites to troll for sex, pure and simple, and would post ANYTHING to get a meeting. After all, you can't make the sale unless you can meet the buyer. (Was THAT crossing the line?).

But more to the point, it's not about whether or not a woman can seek marriage to a 'rich guy' for no other reason than to be taken care of, or a 'rich guy' to marry a woman for no other reason than to have a pretty girl on his arm and in his bed. It's deeper than that, I think. How can you really know what your fiance really has on their mind? Rich guys, do you wonder about this? And beautiful women, do you also wonder if the attraction really isn't just skin deep?

Of course, does this matter a bit to your average Slashdot reader? Let's find out."

Link to Original Source
top

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rickb928 writes "Just when you thought it was bad to talk on your cell phone all the time, comes this story about the amount of cell phone affecting your sperm count and quality. And it's all about the quality, isn't it?

The premise is that men who talk on their cell phones for more than 4 hours a day have lousy sperm.

Of course, the first question I have for the researchers is, 'Dude. The phone is out of my pocket. It's in my ear. I'm not a dickhead".

Whatcha think? Hidden danger or the funniest thing since, well, since tighty-whiteys?



-rick"

Journals

top

Redesign

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

There's a reason Slashdot doesn't redesign the site very often. Same reason I dont lick the stove when its hot.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...