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60 Minutes Dubbed Engines Noise Over Tesla Model S

rickb928 Error? (544 comments)

The error was in getting caught, despite it being obvious.

I suspect that if you dig in, CBS will eventually claim that this is all intended to further engage the audience, give a familiar context, and generally improve the viewing experience. apparently reality is a challenging environment for CBS, but this is not news to me. 60 Minutes in particular has long been challenged by reality, and doesn't show any signs of abating.

All of which above goes for most of the mainstream media. It's entertainment. We love it. Pretending to be informative is alright, so long as we know when the role changes.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft: Start Menu Returns, Windows Free For Small Device OEMs, Cortana Beta

rickb928 Re:Gee, so only a year of screaming (387 comments)

Touchscreens didn't become ubiquitous. Metro Fail.

Film at 11.

about two weeks ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: Dumb logic (747 comments)

Recycling old stories is brilliant. Converted comics even better. Why take a chance on an unproven story our concept? Hollywood is all about making money first, making points second. But ideology also sells, and hollywood, by definition, is compelled to present ideology. They tell stories.

about 1 month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: MMR Outcry? (747 comments)

So, are we redefining autism as encompassing those other conditions etc, or did we mistake autism for all that other stuff?

Btw, most school systems in the U.S. spend 30-40% of their budget on 'special needs' students. Including boys that cannot settle down and learn.

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: Obvious Answer (747 comments)

What causes are included in that statistic? Food poisoning ? Fires? Knife wounds? And how often do people cook at home vs be exposed to communicable diseases, since the population is largely immunized?

BTW, I am in favor of imunization. I'm not in favor of denying unimmunized children healthcare because their parents did not have them immunized.

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: Obvious Answer (747 comments)

Care delayed is care denied. You can't arbitrarily decide the priority for care unless you want to take control of people's lives.

That is the weakest spot in single-payer. Defending the needy, protecting the weak, equal access for all is the right easy.

And putting children at the end of the line because of the bad choices of their parents is almost the worst possible choice. Children are innocent of their parents' decisions.

I don't want YOU in charge of this.

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: Obvious Answer (747 comments)

I was exposed to chickenpox. This got me shingles later in life.

And there was no vaccine for that when I was young. Who do I sue?

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: Obvious Answer (747 comments)

So how does your refusal to vaccinate for children put other vaccinated children at risk?

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: MMR Outcry? (747 comments)

The confusion is deliberately caused

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: ** moron (747 comments)

Hey, AC... How does me not vaccinating my child put your vaccinated child at risk?

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re: Obvious Answer (747 comments)

As I wrote: All legislation is someone's morality.

You seem to believe the State has both authority and responsibility to evaluate your practices raising your children, and should exercise its power to either compel you to raise them a certain way, or when take them from you if they disprove of your practices.

It is important, I think, to consider these policy decisions from a key vantage point - would your opinion change if the State were dominated and controlled by political forces that you did not agree with? More importantly, if you believe that these policies should be enforced because you agree with the political forces that propose them, do you believe that any opposition needs to be silenced, permanently, lest they overturn your choices?

My point isn't that you seem to want a State that is not constitutional in our nation, but that you wish to do unto others that which you probably do not wish done to you.

And for that reason, you should both not do it, and seek to prevent the State from doing it at all.

about a month ago
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43,000-Year-Old Woolly Mammoth Remains Offer Strong Chance of Cloning

rickb928 Clone the Mammoth? Half the deal (187 comments)

I'm equally interested in cloning its last meal.

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re:Dumb logic (747 comments)

" that doesn't mean Hollywood is just part of the intelligence apparatus."

You are literally correct, AC. THAT doesn't demonstrate that Hollywood is part of the intelligence apparatus. You would need more evidence, found by looking elsewhere.

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re:MMR Outcry? (747 comments)

Casually watching the autism debate, I see that autism is:

- Now a spectrum, not a syndrome or disease. This has enlarged the affected population, enhancing the power of their advocates and increasing the urgency of finding a solution;

- Being blamed (root cause) on vaccines, diet, environmental effects, technology, with a de-emphasis on genetics and prenatal care.

- Used to describe many more behaviors, hence becoming a 'spectrum', not a syndrome or disease or even a process.

- Described as a growing treat, capable of potentially impacting a majority of the population, being caused by a multitude of toxins, exposures, and behaviors, hence the urgency to find 'a cure'.

This pattern is familiar to me. Have you other /.rs seen this before?

about a month ago
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Measles Outbreak In NYC

rickb928 Re:Obvious Answer (747 comments)

You can't deny coverage in a single-payer system. You just crank up the deductible/copay, for punishment. Accept the consequences of that action or get out of the business of governing.

And those who do not vaccinate are costing us all money in a single-payer system, which is reason to compel vaccination.

Which is reason to decide on a single-payer healthcare system based not on supposed cost savings, nor even charity/indigent care, but on the inevitable loss of individual choice. Remember, those who do not vaccinate their children put their children at risk, but these are THEIR children, not 'ours'. If they want the freedom to choose how to raise their children, they need to accept the responsibility for their actions.

Yes, radical ideas, that you are responsible for your choices, that if you exercise that right you are subject to the consequences and deserve no shelter from them, and that asking the State to impose your choices on others is always an exercise in using force to impose your will.

All legislation is someone's morality. All if it.

about a month ago
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Meat Makes Our Planet Thirsty

rickb928 Re: Shill (545 comments)

Californians are sending their alfalfa, and thus their water, to Asia.' Alfalfa growers are now exporting some 100 billion gallons of water a year from this drought-ridden region to the other side of the world in the form of alfalfa. "

Yes, and changing Asian rang habits will not be any rather than changing Californian eating habits.

about a month ago
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Vast Surveillance Network Powered By Repo Men

rickb928 Re: Shazbot! (352 comments)

I'm a little tired of this.

Is there a difference between someone using their camcorder and someone outfitting a fleet of vehicles with cameras to record your license plate, location, and time/date? Yes - the fleet is able to track you without alerting you so easily.

Should I expect that the government be permitted to track my activities in public without a warrant? No.

Why should I expect a business to be permitted to do the same thing?

And why should I permit such a business to do this for profit? I should not. While this considered to be 'in public', most parking lots are actually private property.

This seems wrong a level that trouble me greatly.

about a month ago

Submissions

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Cox Coaster, life in the frustrating lane

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So, I've become a participant in the Cox Coaster trial here in the Phoenix area, and I'm wondering if any of you have had a shot at this elsewhere, or if you have some questions about it.

Coaster is Cox's IPTV offering, still being built and tested apparently. As part of the deal, I got a new Cisco router/firewall/wifi hub, the Coaster PC, HDMI cable, and TWO remotes.

And so far, it is an unrewarding experience, but I'm not done trying it out. Verdict pending.

Questions?"

Link to Original Source
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We're the governent, and we're here to secure you

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So the Pentagon, with their shiny new CyberCom commander and all that, are trying to convince corporate CEOs and "companies that operate critical infrastructures" to let them install monitoring systems on their networks or, quote, "stay in the wild wild west of the unprotected internet".

From the article:

"Defense Deputy Secretary William Lynn III, speaking at the Strategic Command Cyber Symposium in Nebraska, said we need to think imaginatively about how to use the National Security Agencyââs Einstein monitoring systems on critical private-sector networks ââ such as those in the financial, utility and communication industries ââ in order to protect us."

Sure sounds good to me. Let the Pentagon keep an eye on your critical network, and they will not only alert you to something going wrong, but they'll even respond to the threat. And if you operate 'critical infrastructure'. you owe it to our nation to opt-in, right? I mean. What could go wrong? It's the Pentagon, surely they know what they're doing, right?"

Link to Original Source
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Hidden web ads inflate revenues, don't annoy us

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "Well, sort of...

The Wall Street Journal publishes here (Same story, who stole what???) and here:

'Kraft Foods, Greyhound Lines and Capital One Financial have bought some strange ads on the Internet lately. What's so strange about them is that they're invisible.

The companies might not have known about their invisible display ads — the kind that are supposed to appear alongside content on Web pages — if not for Ben Edelman, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School who studies Internet advertising.

Mr. Edelman says his research shows that all three marketers, and many others, have fallen victim to Web sites that use such ads as a way to sell more ad space than they have.

The Web sites can get away with it, he says, because online advertisers don't always audit their campaigns for proof their ads are appearing. It isn't clear how common these ads are or how much they cost marketers.

Mr. Edelman and other Internet-security experts say the ads are created with the use of computer code that makes it look to marketers as though their ads are showing up on legitimate Web sites. But consumers who visit those sites can't see the ads because they have been placed on invisible Web pages.

In one example, visitors to a site called MyToursInfo.com saw an ordinary-looking Web page with one ad for Verizon Communications and another for a weight-loss product. But, Mr. Edelman, who studied the site in January, said software code running behind the scenes opened more than 40 Web pages, each including three ads from marketers such as Domino's Pizza and Capital One, which were invisible to visitors.

Mr. Edelman's analysis of the code was confirmed by computer-security experts at Symantec and McAfee as well as online-ad advisory firms DoubleVerify and Anchor Intelligence.'

Sweet. I'm not sure what's worse, these and other companies being cheated out of ad dollars by this latest wrinkle in fraud, or us waiting while these invisible pages load. Not only do we suffer through interminable Flash loads, every geegaw Web trick to tickle our eyeballs and/or ears, but we now can be pretty sure that some of those sites that take so ^*%^ long to load are actually loading up page after page of 'invisible' ads.

I'm shocked, SHOCKED! Ad fraud, right under our noses, on the Internet? Oh my..."
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The Empire Strikes Back: Broadcast's end run?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 writes "Is this Television's big step past Cable? USA Today quotes John Eck, President of NBC Network and Media Works:

"If we play it right, it can be a compelling service"

Indeed, if several manufacturers follow suit and build mobile receivers, as LG, Samsung, Zenith, Kenwood, and others disclosed at CES in Las Vegas, this would offer viewers an option to cable, and even to Internet services such as Hulu, among others. Might even impact Youtube...

By offering local news, which normally isn't available from cellphone video services, they could leverage their fading brands even more, and most importantly directly to their audience. And probably preserve advertising views as well, which gives them an advantage with advertisers who pretty much despise Tivo and other services that let viewers bypass ads and get to the good stuff.

From the USA Today story: "At least 63 stations in 22 cities — including New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston and Washington — will transmit news, entertainment and sports to portable devices this year, according to the broadcast industry's Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC).

The initial group will include affiliates of ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, CW, ION and PBS. Each city will have a different mix. Most will simulcast regularly scheduled shows."

Gotta love it. Broadcast TV joining forces with the cellphone industry to take on a common enemy: Cable, which has been intruding on Telephony's turf with VOIP services, and clearly would love to dominate IP Television, may have a foe that can actually hurt them where it counts; in the wallet.

Do we consumers get anything out of this? 'Free' (as in beer) TV, albeit on smaller, mobile screens? On-demand shows? (I doubt that). Local stations on our phones or whatever little device? Smaller pictures of Jennifer Aniston? Is this a good thing?"

Link to Original Source
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Reporters at Black Hat get bounced for hacking

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rickb928 (945187) writes "So some reporters at Black Hat decided to teach the other reporters in the press room about the importance of securing their connections. They must have been thinking "hmm.. this is Black Hat, so why not hack their ids and passords and stuff, and show them how pwned they are, right?".

Not so funny. At Black Hat, hacking is encouraged. Everywhere except the Press Room, apparently.

So the reporters, from the French magazine 'Global Security Magazine', apparently did the unthinkable — hack at Black Hat:

"The French journalists — identified by organizers as Dominique Jouniot, Marc Brami, Mauro Israel — apparently set up their own server to siphon off traffic passing through the media room's central router."

Once again, hacking is cool. Unless, of course, it's done at you, or where you don't want it to be done.

Right back at ya, Black Hat."

Link to Original Source
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Gold Digger or opportunist? Sexist or pragmatist?

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rickb928 writes "When this story" on my company's internal blog, I had to go read the original. Yep, allegedly a woman posted a personal ad on Craigslist asking how to meet her 'Sugar Daddy' move to New York City, and basically cash in. And this is a reposting of the ad and a response.

Some of this may or may not be true — and that's not my point. But this gets me thinking. And wondering. Among other things;

Was there a line crossed in this posting and response? I mean, the obvious observations in the NYT article include the blatant sexism by both the woman and the responder, and while many will complain that his (and I assume it was a 'he') response was throughly sexist, wasn't it also honest, brutally so? And what about the woman posting? While she's honest, she's probably smart to be anonymous as well. Posting her photo would not make her gym visits bearable, I bet.

What was the most outrageous thing you have read in a personal ad? I read plenty when I was dating, and the ones pointing out that Republicans, ex-military, etc. need not apply always got my attention. And I got plenty angry until I realized that it was for the best that I avoided these women. And many men used the dating sites to troll for sex, pure and simple, and would post ANYTHING to get a meeting. After all, you can't make the sale unless you can meet the buyer. (Was THAT crossing the line?).

But more to the point, it's not about whether or not a woman can seek marriage to a 'rich guy' for no other reason than to be taken care of, or a 'rich guy' to marry a woman for no other reason than to have a pretty girl on his arm and in his bed. It's deeper than that, I think. How can you really know what your fiance really has on their mind? Rich guys, do you wonder about this? And beautiful women, do you also wonder if the attraction really isn't just skin deep?

Of course, does this matter a bit to your average Slashdot reader? Let's find out."

Link to Original Source
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rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rickb928 writes "Just when you thought it was bad to talk on your cell phone all the time, comes this story about the amount of cell phone affecting your sperm count and quality. And it's all about the quality, isn't it?

The premise is that men who talk on their cell phones for more than 4 hours a day have lousy sperm.

Of course, the first question I have for the researchers is, 'Dude. The phone is out of my pocket. It's in my ear. I'm not a dickhead".

Whatcha think? Hidden danger or the funniest thing since, well, since tighty-whiteys?



-rick"

Journals

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Redesign

rickb928 rickb928 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

There's a reason Slashdot doesn't redesign the site very often. Same reason I dont lick the stove when its hot.

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