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Cameron Accuses Internet Companies Of Giving Terrorists Safe Haven

rnturn "Get a great job..." (178 comments)

"...reading every comment ever made on all of the Internet fora and passing along potential terrierist threats to the government!"

Exactly how does the idjit Cameron think an ISP is supposed to do this? Doesn't your vaunted government capture of everything that transpires on the Internet work any more?

2 days ago
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Education Chief Should Know About PLATO and the History of Online CS Education

rnturn Re:Not news (134 comments)

I think the point of the story is that Duncan has never shown any curiosity once he got out of college. His degree is in Sociology and not Education so I think there are some valid questions as to his qualifications. I think it's rather telling that he doesn't even know what's been done in the past in the field in which he's employed. You have to wonder just that the heck he does all day. He's never done anything in education other than be an administrator. And he's never been much good at doing that. Chicago's pubic schools were a mess when he started running them and they were a mess when he left. Actual educators can't stand the guy.

BTW, PLATO was hardly a "niche" system and it was certainly never considered "irrelevant" by anyone who knows what the heck they're talking about. I first encountered it while on a two week high school trip (JETS) to UofI but didn't have as much time to access it as I would have liked. There were PLATO terminals in many colleges back in the '70s; I know there was at least a couple of them where I did my undergraduate work. The PLATO terminals were heavily used and getting time on them required signing up for a time slot well in advance. It's may be "cool" nowadays to consider the PLATO system "niche" but people need to remember that the world of computing and computer-aided education didn't begin with the Internet. PLATO was in use while Duncan was going to college at Harvard; maybe they just didn't have a terminal in the Sociology Department.

about two weeks ago
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What Happens When Nobody Proofreads an Academic Paper

rnturn Had that happen to me. (170 comments)

In a previous life, I had put a humorous phrase -- a reference to ``Real Programming'' -- in a technical report that was support to be submitted to a government agency that we were working for under contract. None of the others who reviewed the report noticed it -- maybe they were too busy that day and didn't pay as much attention as they normally did. They'd typically spot any questionable grammar that I might have used and I was sure someone would catch it and send it back to me to change. Nobody did, though, and I was lucky enough to get it back and delete the phrase before the report went went out the door. Learned a valuable lessen about trusting proofreaders that day: Don't.

about two weeks ago
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French Health Watchdog: 3D Viewing May Damage Eyesight In Children

rnturn I thought the 3D fad... (99 comments)

... was all but dead anyway. Replaced by the (OMG! it costs how much?) 4K fad.

about three weeks ago
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Tech Recruiters Defend 'Blacklists,' Lack of Feedback, Screening Techniques

rnturn Re: They WILL rewrite your resume... (253 comments)

``... in their style and draw from what you submit to them. You HAVE the RIGHT to see what it is that they are submitted to their client on your behalf. Ask for it.''

I understood that recruiters would sometimes do this -- usually replacing your address information with that of the recruiting firm, largely to protect themselves from companies that would do something underhanded like contact the candidate directly after telling the recruiter that they were taking a pass on the candidate -- but I found out that that's not the only reason. Back when I was working with VMS (early '90s), I went into an interview for a job as a VMS system manager only to get bombarded with programming questions. And, while I've done a fair amount of programming over the years, these questions were completely off the wall so I asked the interviewer if I could see the copy of my resume he was referring to. The recruiter had inserted wording that made it seem as though I had years of experience as a COBOL programmer -- which I most definitely was not. I apologized and ended the interview. The phone call I made to the recruiter after the interview was no fun. For the recruiter. I never worked with him or anyone else at that firm again.

about three weeks ago
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Tech Recruiters Defend 'Blacklists,' Lack of Feedback, Screening Techniques

rnturn Re:Recruiters are my second least favorite people (253 comments)

``LinkedIn allows you to directly apply to companies, without having to go through recruiters.''

I think most, if not all, jobs that you apply to via LinkedIn still take you to the company's ATS, no?

One cool feature that I recall seeing on LinkedIn were job postings that were exclusive to LinkedIn and which, allegedly, got preferential attention by the company recruiters. I have seen that for some years, though.

about three weeks ago
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Tech Recruiters Defend 'Blacklists,' Lack of Feedback, Screening Techniques

rnturn Re:Scum (253 comments)

Name names. Or at least the company she worked for. Behavior like this should be publicized.

about three weeks ago
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Tech Recruiters Defend 'Blacklists,' Lack of Feedback, Screening Techniques

rnturn Re:Depends on the company (253 comments)

I've gotten the same sort of calls: poor English, jobs that were barely applicable (in most cases I suspect my resume was flagged based on only one or two keywords), and then almost demanding that I authorize them to submit me to their client. Nearly always these calls come with my never having seen an email containing the job description (which would have been extremely helpful given their thick accent) so I can't tell whether this is something I'd even consider. Most of the time, when I ask for them to send me a copy of the job description (getting them to actually do this is like pulling teeth), quite often it never arrives. If the description does arrive, I'm usually flabbergasted to find that it's either an entry level position (with a corresponding hourly rate) or their client appears to be looking for an entire IT department in a single person (sysadmin, DBA, network admin, Java developer, and more). When we talk again about the position and I explain that it's not a good fit -- based on a mismatch of skill set, rate, location, whatever -- they won't take "no" for an answer and, nearly always, follow up with 'authorization to submit' email. Even after, I've pointed out "Hey... the job description says that such-n-such a technology is mandatory and I don't have experience with that" they'll come back with "Oh... that's not a problem." Really?

about three weeks ago
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Tech Recruiters Defend 'Blacklists,' Lack of Feedback, Screening Techniques

rnturn Re:Scum (253 comments)

You used to see this (and probably still do today; I haven't looked in years) in the employment section of, say, IEEE journals. Extremely detailed job descriptions for research associate positions, post-docs, etc. that we all laughed at knowing that this was one of those job adverts that was done to satisfy a legal requirement and that the job description was nothing more than a slightly watered down abstract of the thesis or dissertation written by the person they already knew they wanted to hire.

about three weeks ago
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Tech Recruiters Defend 'Blacklists,' Lack of Feedback, Screening Techniques

rnturn Re:Not scum - just the wrong incentives (253 comments)

``I have a resume with very diverse experience and my skill set is that of a generalist which means recruiters have NO idea what to do with me. In years past I've been blown off by more recruiters than I care to think about.''

I have a similar background: developer, sysadmin, storage admin, backups, capacity planning, performance management, disaster recovery planning, management, project management, with great troubleshooting/diagnostics skills and I get calls from "recruiters" who home in like a laser beam on one single keyword in my resume thinking that I'll be interested in a low salary job working as a technician. On a 3-4 month contract. Third shift. In Mudhole, Idaho. Oy! Fortunately, I do have a few recruiters that I've worked with who understand someone with a varied background. Now if only more hiring managers would stop to consider what someone with a background that isn't completely monochromatic could be doing for their team, the three of us might be come up with a win-win-win outcome.

The other situation I ran into was taking a call from a recruiter about a job where it seems their clients are only interested in finding someone with 5-7 years experience in the advertised skill set but only looking to make a parallel move. As one person described it:

``... employers want candidates who have been doing the exact job for years already, and who are willing to take a pay cut to do it some more.''

Pass. And shame on the recruiters that feed that sick hiring strategy.

about three weeks ago
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The Plane Crash That Gave Us GPS

rnturn Re: Civilian access to GPS (236 comments)

``In 2000, not that long before he left office, President Clinton got rid of selective availability and freed the world from ever depending on paper maps or confusing directions from relatives again.''

And one more skill disappears from the public's toolkit. (Along with being able to make change and others.)

I remember when the Iowa Basics tests taken in grade school used to include a section on map reading. Nowadays, it seems most people don't even know how to open a map let alone read one.

about three weeks ago
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Another Election, Another Slew of Voting Machine Glitches

rnturn Re: When are we going to get this right? (388 comments)

Most likely when the electronic machines are sent to a recycling company -- Ireland recently dumped all theirs -- and paper ballots are used. The electronic machines have proven to be way too unreliable and easy to manipulate.

about three weeks ago
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The Great IT Hiring He-Said / She-Said

rnturn Re:Everyone takes things personally here (574 comments)

``When you have potential employers that would reject you in preference for other based on even just a list of the fiction recently read it's better to not let them get anything via that channel, and to do their jobs properly.''

Well, this guy looks like he's got the technical skills but since I can't find anything about his personal life online and make a recommendation based on his past behavior, likes, dislikes, etc.: REJECTED!

about three weeks ago
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World War II Tech eLoran Deployed As GPS Backup In the UK

rnturn Re:Pretty cool (139 comments)

Clock quality isn't the problem. You need four satellites even if you have an atomic clock. If you had a clock that was perfectly synchronized to GPS system time, you could get by with three SVs.

about three weeks ago
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The Most Highly Cited Scientific Papers of All Time

rnturn Claude Shannon? (81 comments)

Nothing of his seems to have made the list. Sort of surprising.

about a month ago
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Verizon Launches Tech News Site That Bans Stories On US Spying

rnturn Re: ISP Home Page (145 comments)

``any company in 2014 still believes their customers give the least damn about their ISP's home page''

You mean my ISP has one? I never thought to look figuring it'd be about as useful as the old AOL web site.

But back to the topic at hand: Way to go guys... shoot your credibility to kingdom come right out of the gate by placing limits on what will be covered. You might as well add a subtitle: "Cheery Verizon-approved News".

about a month ago
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Ex-CBS Reporter Claims Government Agency Bugged Her Computer

rnturn Just another so-called "conspiracy" theory. (235 comments)

First, it's the New York Post which is largely unsuitable for wrapping fish in let alone as a reliable source of "news". Second, she claims that all her work on Benghazi cover-up and Fast-N-Furious gun running scandals was being messed with. So her noble work in helping to promulgate right-wing nut job conspiracy theories was being thwarted. Next we'll be told that Obama himself wrote and installed the malware on her computer.

about a month ago

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