×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Skeptics Would Like Media To Stop Calling Science Deniers 'Skeptics'

rnws Re:Established science CANNOT BE QUESTIONED! (548 comments)

Therein lies a big part of the problem, why should their be a "side". Science is about the finding of fact and facts don't care what side you're on. You might want to deny that a certain type of virus won't affect you because of your religious belief for example. Problem is, the virus doesn't care, don't have a "side" and will kill you just as well as everyone on the other "side". People can deny all kinds of things as much as they like, but in the final measure, it doesn't matter squat, the climate will change, you will get lung cancer, HPV will infect you, whatever...

yesterday
top

Renewables Are Now Scotland's Biggest Energy Source

rnws Re:It will never work (235 comments)

Cost is subject to volume it's also relative. Consider just how overbudget things like the UK's Trident nuclear weapon system is or the JSF for that matter.
It wasn't so long ago that an energy transmission cable was proposed from Iceland to the UK and Continental Europe so that all that geothermal energy could feed the mainland beast. Having flown over that part of the world a fiar bit, let me tell you Iceland is a one hell of lot further than Scotland's minor islands.

about three weeks ago
top

Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

rnws Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

Speaking as an Enterprise vendor: 1. Nobody ewver pays list. 2. You aren't just paying for the device, there's a tonne of development going on. One dedupe appliance I worked with had over 120 engineers behind it that all have to be paid, plus every time you put something into the market, you find all kinds of weird-ass coner-cases that have to be diagnosed, debugged and fixed. You have global manufacturing, logistics and 24x7 support infrastructures to pay for. We also try and engineer-in more reliability, redundancy and durability than you can buy off-theshelf. LTO, for example, is *two to three orders of magnitude more reliable* than consumer hard disks.

about three weeks ago
top

Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

rnws Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

Fine, YOU ship an EMC VNX for $300 and then we can talk.

about three weeks ago
top

Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

rnws Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

As LTO can compress (for free) and encrypt (usually licensed) in hardware, I'd rather hope that your NetApp compression (and deduplication) is also free or are you paying for that? Even there you get better reduction ratios for less money if you purchased a dedupe appliance from Quantum, HP or EMC.
Tape is seldom the bottleneck if you have sized it correctly. If the tape is running slow (e.g. an LTO-6 drive running at 60MB/s) then it is the disk array that cannot supply it data fast enough. If the drive is running at 160MB/s then it's maxxing out (assuming you get no compression which today assumes 320MB/s). The vast majority of business arrays are optimised for IOPS and backup is a _sustained_sequential_ workload and once you empty their cache's most arrays just can't keep tape drive buffers stuffed, but few storage admin have the testicular fortitude to admit their big-$ array can't do sustained sequential workloads very well.

One more reason SSD's are such an improvement is they seldom have trouble keeping tape streaming and thus make tape work far better than disk ever could.

Finally, at the hundreds of TB, or in the peta-scale, disk is simply unsustainable at volume, between purchase, licensing, support contracts, power and cooling and generation migrations every 3 to 5 years.

Your home NAS is not the same problem organisations with very, *very* large datasets have to solve and thus very different cost-structures.

about three weeks ago
top

Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

rnws Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

As LTO can compress (for free) and encrypt (usually licensed) in hardware, I'd rather hope that your NetApp compression (and deduplication) is also free or are you paying for that? Even there you get better reduction ratios for less money if you purchased a dedupe appliance from Quantum, HP or EMC.
Tape is seldom the bottleneck if you have sized it correctly. If the tape is running slow (e.g. an LTO-6 drive running at 60MB/s) then it is the disk array that cannot supply it data fast enough. If the drive is running at 160MB/s then it's maxxing out (assuming you get no compression). The vast majority of business arrays are optimised for IOPS and backup is a *sequential* workload and once you empty their cache's most arrays just can't keep tape drive buffers stuffed, but few storage admin have the testicular fortitude to admit their big-$ array can't do sustained sequential workloads very well.

One reason SSD's are so good is they never have trouble keeping tape streaming and thus make tape far more reliable than disk.

Finally, at the hundreds of TB, or in the peta-scale, disk is simply unsustainable at volume, between purchase, licensing, support contracts, power and cooling and generation migrations every 3 to 5 years.

Your home NAS and I daresay (what sounds like) your single NetApp NAS, are not the same problems organisations with very, very large datasets have to solve and thus very different cost-structures.

about three weeks ago
top

Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

rnws Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

To get a drop-in replacement for an existing tape library so that you don't have to rebuild your entire backup workflow overnight.

If you look at most deduping PBBA's like Quantum's DXi range or HP's D2D, you can see they allow you to emulate a tape library as a *non-disruptive* drop-in replacement and they also let you creat SMb or NFS targets too so as new backup sets are created or as old tape sets expire out of rotation, new backup jobs can be created on the LAN instead.

Don't forget - what works _for_you_ may not work for the hundreds of thousands of other businesses worldwide.

about three weeks ago
top

Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

rnws Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

I used to work at an LTO manufacturer and asked why we never drove the older generations down into the SMB space and it is simply this - the components are *really* expensive, the majority of the component cost of the drive is the R/W head, that alone probably accounts for 25% of the drive and you just can't push the price down much further, it costs what it costs. Also, the HUGE majority of these things go into libraries with hundreds of drives, thousands of slots and robots that can move upwards of 90km per hour.

about three weeks ago
top

Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

rnws Consolidation of manufacture (284 comments)

Several years ago when the overall tape market was declining, this was essentially due to the growth of LTO being masked as it cannibalised all the other tape formats (DAT, DLT, SAIT, et al), the overall number of LTO media shipments has continued to increase, that is, PB's shipped.

Two tape-centric factors are in play; capacities keep getting massively bigger but there are fewer customers that can actually use up all the available capacity. Spooks, arguably, but there are lot fewer intelligence agencies in the world than the small and medium-sized businesses that make up the bulk (around 80 percent) of the global economy. The Entertainment industries sure like LTO, its capaciousness and reliability has proven ideal for archiving the digital masters of their SD/HD/4k/IMAX/onwards and upwards formats. Though again, not that many when compared to the global economy.

The second factor is, everyone's known LTO-7 has been coming for a while and tape purchasing cycles always slow down around the introduction of a new capacity point. Organisations usually skip a generation (people who bought LTO-3, probably skipped four and upgraded to five) and once they do buy a new generation, usually buy a smaller library as they can now store double the capacity in a library half the size (and cost).

Like any tech, once the easy science and engineering is done, the market shakes out and the few reamining players begin to consolidate, usually down to one or two as tape has done, as disk is now doing and as SSD's will do in the next couple of years. Right now the only companies doing fundamental physics and materials research into tape are IBM and Fujifilm. Quantum no longer makes its own drives, HP will not make its own LTO-7, leaving everybody buying off IBM while the long-tail business windows down. IBM has played the same game here thay played with mainframes, they doubled-down and invested in new technology when everyone else was giving up in the face of Windows and PC's. The mainframe busines is still a $2bn per annum business and will remain a significant chunk o' change for many years to come. (Arguably, it's actually growing in some places...) That's a nice business model where all the costs have been sunk and what's left is maintenance margin. Well-played IBM. (As long as IBM's tape business can survive the sinking revenues of it's disk business which it's lumped in with).

Maybe to survive LTO will roll into a proper joint-venture, single manufacturer, where HP, IBM, Quantum and perhaps Oracle, throw in their IP to keep the drive technology best-of-breed and keep their share of that long-tail business. (Don't hold you breath though, too many ego's in that equation). Maybe it'll spin out into a niche business like OpenVMS has.

Given the problems the disk manufacturers appear to be having in shipping their new tech (SMD and HAMR) to the public in volume and the rise of SSD's, given that there is no significant amount of disk in (the massive global) archive, it's likely hard disks will die off well before tape does as it's far easier to swap out todays primary arrays for SSD's than it will be to migrate the mass of archives on tape.

about three weeks ago
top

Congress Suggests Moat, Electronic Fence To Protect White House

rnws Re:Shoot one (213 comments)

Immigration? Seriously? Puh-lease, go cry to the Native Americans already. How about those "annexed" Hawaiians who then had their land filled up with "immigrants" from the USA until a large enough number of them had moved in to vote for statehood. You worried that's what South Americans might do to your little paradise too? Turnabout's a bitch. Suck it up.

about a month ago
top

Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

rnws Re:Go back in time 5 years (581 comments)

Massive? Well, that's relative. Last time I checked the plan it was most certainly NOT the plan to have a collection of small daemons long-term, many more functions will be rolled into it over time.

about 1 month ago
top

Window Washing a Skyscraper Is Beyond a Robot's Reach

rnws Re:A cost equation (203 comments)

Pilkington's "Activ" glass will self-clean in the rain. Though with credit to your comment, they recommend hosing it during prolonged dry spells.

about a month ago
top

RIM Co-CEO Cries 'No Fair' On Security Question

rnws Re:IOW (329 comments)

"It's not like they would be able to fight it if USA was the same." - Actually it IS the same. Nokia was criticised in Iran's crackdown a while back and people called for aboycott of their products, for having sold cellular network equipment that's lets the government of Iran, track, intercept and listen to calls or data - technology that was put in place when that kit was sold many years ealier in the western world. I used to sell GSM tech over a decade ago in a western nation and even then government was wanting ways in. EVERY government in the world requires this. I've never owned a RIM phone, indeed I work for a competitor of theirs and EVERY manufacturer of cellular tech has to to this. We MUST comply with the law of each nation we do business in. Why is nobody picking on Alcatel-Lucent, Motorola, Ericsson, Apple, Google and a host of others?

This is pretty crap journalisim on Rory Cellan-Jones' part - better would be exposing how all the other manufacturers of networks, management systems and handsets all do this and how it's done every day right here in our own back-yard.

more than 3 years ago
top

Michio Kaku's Dark Prediction For the End of Moore's Law

rnws On vacuum tubes. (347 comments)

The major difference being the tube/valve industry was done in by the transistor - i.e. we had a viable replacement that was better. The problem with the transistor is that we don't (yet) have a viable replacement.

more than 2 years ago
top

Geek Travel To London From the US — Tips?

rnws BUY AN UMBRELLA (1095 comments)

A good quality umbrella - but you're from Washington State - you already know all about rain :-D

about 5 years ago
top

Con Kolivas Returns, With a Desktop-Oriented Linux Scheduler

rnws Re:great news (333 comments)

"better options already exists for servers where I am guessing CFS is used." Well, that depends on your workload (which is the thrust of the debate). With one of the HPC products I regularly work with, we have a best-practice of using the noop scheduler instead of cfs - this tiny tweak alone will see at least a 30% improvement in our I/O performance (which is nothing to be sneezed at when we're moving ~700MB/s). Being able to have pluggable schedulers is great because Linux can be all things to all people and it does make sense to have options (lets not go crazy here - too much choice can also be a bad thing). People talk about the difference between Linux on netbooks and servers for example but even in the "server" space there is VAST difference between small business file & print, clustered Oracle or scientific data acquisition workloads. I too hope that this debate doesn't go away and also hope that it doesn't become as heated and personal as in the past so that we can all benefit from a selection of good ideas.

more than 5 years ago
top

Deposit Checks By iPhone

rnws Re:Checks (293 comments)

Nope but I can pay them via my cellphone http://www.pago.co.nz/, or the over the web (or via the web, from my cellphone). Usually transfers to another bank happen with 24 hours, to an account within the same bank, sometimes within 12. That's back home, but here in the UK (where I reside), I can pay anybody in the UK or EU via their SWIFT code or IBAN. I can transfer funds to accounts overseas to unrelated banks within 24 hours via Internet banking. I got my first debit card & PIN 22 years ago and haven't looked back. Don't even have a chequebook here in the UK, and the last one I wrote back home must have been like 10 years ago.

more than 5 years ago
top

China's First Mars Probe Ready To Launch

rnws Re:Yinghuo = "Firefly" (67 comments)

Yeah, I saw that and it made me smile. Especially after a certain space-station module could have been named "Colbert" and NASA wussed out on "Serenity" and went with "Tranquility" (the EIGHTH-placed vote!) instead.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

top

Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo crashes during test flight

rnws rnws writes  |  about a month and a half ago

rnws (554280) writes "Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo space tourism craft has crashed in a California desert after experiencing what the company described as "a serious anomaly".

The firm says the status of their pilots is "unknown at this time". The craft was undergoing manned testing.

Television images shot from a helicopter showed what appeared to be wreckage bearing the Virgin logo."

Link to Original Source
top

Court orders two sisters must receive MMR vaccine

rnws rnws writes  |  about a year ago

rnws (554280) writes "The BBC reports that an English High Court judge has ruled that sisters aged 15 and 11 must have the MMR vaccine even though they and their mother do not want it. The High Court decision, made last month, came after the girls' father brought a case seeking vaccination.
When outlining her decision in the latest case, Mrs Justice Theis emphasised it was a specific case "only concerned with the welfare needs of these children", but lawyers say as one of a series it confirms there is no longer any debate about the benefits of the vaccine."

Link to Original Source
top

Microsoft makes a $15million IP payment to Quantum

rnws rnws writes  |  about a year ago

rnws (554280) writes "Now this is interesting. Tucked away in Quantum's latest results is a $15million dollar payment from Microsoft for Quantum IP. What IP isn't specified but the leading candidate may be Microsoft's addition of dedupe to Windows Server. However it's widely known in the storage industry that Quantum's StorNext file system underpins Apple's XSAN. A new file system string to Windows' bow perhaps? Whatever it is, Quantum must have one heck of a patent for a reletive behemoth like Microsoft to come calling."
top

Tony Sale, Colossus computer conservationist, dies

rnws rnws writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rnws (554280) writes ""Sadly noted on the BBC news last night that: "Tony Sale, the brilliant engineer who led the rebuild of Colossus, the first modern computer, has died aged 80."

"The mammoth project to recreate the code-cracking Colossus capped a career built around electronics and computers.

Most recently, Mr Sale drove the campaign to save Bletchley Park, where Colossus aided Allied code-cracking efforts during World War II.

At Bletchley he also founded the National Museum of Computing to help preserve the UK's ageing computers."

More video here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14726045""

Link to Original Source
top

Bush Administration Muzzled Surgeon General

rnws rnws writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rnws writes "The Scientific Activist blog is carrying comment on a New York times article on political pressure applied to the former US Surgeon General:

Yesterday, former Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona testified before congress that he was subjected to extensive and systematic political interference in his work by the Bush Administration. From Gardiner Harris of The New York Times:

"The administration, Dr. Carmona said, would not allow him to speak or issue reports about stem cells, emergency contraception, sex education, or prison, mental and global health issues."
"Dr. Carmona said he was ordered to mention President Bush three times on every page of his speeches. He also said he was asked to make speeches to support Republican political candidates and to attend political briefings.
And administration officials even discouraged him from attending the Special Olympics because, he said, of that charitable organization's longtime ties to a "prominent family" that he refused to name.
"I was specifically told by a senior person, 'Why would you want to help those people?'""

Link to Original Source

Journals

rnws has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?