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Comments

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Safercar.gov Overwhelmed By Recall For Deadly Airbags

roc97007 I dunno... (110 comments)

> What can sites serving an important public function do to ensure they stay running during periods of unexpected load?

I dunno...maybe ask how google and yahoo and amazon do it, instead of going with the standard government formula for developing websites, which is clearly NOT WORKING.

I think one could make a case for government website development being a parable for many, perhaps most, government supplied services. If the government doesn't directly benefit, (ie, IRS) it can't be done in reasonable time for reasonable funding.

2 hours ago
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The Future of Stamps

roc97007 Re:Too complicated (84 comments)

...especially since you likely already have a laser printer, and therefore already have the ability to print stamps as needed.

3 hours ago
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The Future of Stamps

roc97007 yeah let's do that (84 comments)

Let's create a brand new type of stamp and launch a taxpayer-funded initiative to upgrade every sorting machines. It'll only take a gazillion dollars, not be completed in any reasonable amount of time, and eventually abandoned.

3 hours ago
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'Microsoft Lumia' Will Replace the Nokia Brand

roc97007 Re:lumia... (130 comments)

And Microsoft had tuned the OS so that rebooting the phone only takes 2.3 seconds, which means you don't have to wait very long if you want to turn the flashlight on.

...but they reboot in 2.3 seconds by restoring a state image from the previous session. A full reboot after BSOD will still take 23 minutes.

7 hours ago
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'Microsoft Lumia' Will Replace the Nokia Brand

roc97007 lumia... (130 comments)

"Microsoft Lumia. Because it will function as a flashlight."

10 hours ago
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Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

roc97007 Re:I installed it (138 comments)

Any unsuccessful software product, even Microsoft Bob, have their proponents. I'm aware that there are people who liked really large monochrome squares. Shrug. Don't really care.

but more to the point, the presence of a start menu is not something I somehow decreed that Microsoft had to have (as if I could do that). It's simply something I would not do without. Microsoft is free to keep the busybox interface, I hear it does really well with children. They'll just have to do it without me as a customer.

I approach 9 (now called 10) with caution. Microsoft lost a lot of credibility with 8, and they lost even more when they "gave you back the start button" which was only an icon that took us to the start screen. I'm concerned about what arrogant new thing they'll try to foist on us next time, and wondering if I should take this opportunity to get out. And really, I don't need them anymore. I'm mostly sticking with them at this point only because it's too much trouble to switch. (Sort-of like why people stay with Comcast.)

To make this perfectly clear: Microsoft can do what it wants. It's their product. I can choose to buy it or not. It's my money. I really don't invest any more emotional energy in it than that.

3 days ago
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Battery Breakthrough: Researchers Claim 70% Charge In 2 Minutes, 20-Year Life

roc97007 Re:Charging amperage (395 comments)

> Tesla is presently the show off for the affluent crowd.

Damned right. Excellent point, and one that's often lost in the noise. If we're not solving for everyman, then this zero point emission thang will only be a rich person's toy. Which kinda blows the whole point of the effort.

But I'd argue that 60kWh battery packs, or even larger, may be important in larger, load carrying vehicles. For instance, when I need to carry objects that wouldn't fit in an econodeathbox, I use an F-series truck. If those are ever going to be electrified, they're going to need bigger packs than a Leaf, and charge time may be an issue. So fast charge of larger power packs may still be something worth exploring, even if you're not planning to tear up the road in an overpriced sports car.

about a week ago
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Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

roc97007 Re:I installed it (138 comments)

Hey, putting the start menu back was a big deal. It's one of the top requirements in my decision on whether or not to switch to Apple.

about a week ago
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Lockheed Claims Breakthrough On Fusion Energy Project

roc97007 grain of salt (564 comments)

I'm not convinced, (been burned on that too many times over too many years) but in the back of my mind I always thought that if practical fusion is ever achieved, it'd be by a private company that intends to make money off it.

So, we put one 'a' these next to every one of those 2400 amp auto quick chargers, and we'd really have something.

Something this small also revives the possibility of fusion propelled spacecraft.

But, you know, it has to work first.

about a week ago
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Battery Breakthrough: Researchers Claim 70% Charge In 2 Minutes, 20-Year Life

roc97007 Re:There is no battery (395 comments)

It does seem like a lot of "breakthroughs" lately have been edge conditions that aren't practical to reproduce.

about a week ago
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Battery Breakthrough: Researchers Claim 70% Charge In 2 Minutes, 20-Year Life

roc97007 Re:Charging amperage (395 comments)

The Tesla car battery is 375 Volt.
85kWh to 70% in 2 minutes would require around 5000 amps. Lets say that a more realistic charge current is 1000 Amps. 10 minutes at the station, that's doable but the connector is going to be some kind of beast.

Was wondering about that. Surely the power pack is made up of a group of individual cells. It seems like you could attach a cable to each cell and charge them all simultaneously without having to use a single cable as big as your leg.

It'd be inconvenient to attach and deattach, but perhaps industrial robots could be employed. That might be interesting to watch.

about a week ago
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Battery Breakthrough: Researchers Claim 70% Charge In 2 Minutes, 20-Year Life

roc97007 Re:Charging amperage (395 comments)

20KW generators powered by diesel engines are pretty common...oh wait.

That's a succinct example of the difference between "zero emissions" and "zero point emissions".

about a week ago
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Battery Breakthrough: Researchers Claim 70% Charge In 2 Minutes, 20-Year Life

roc97007 Re:Just moves a choke point (395 comments)

Simple. Put each of those new 2000 amp charging stations next to one 'a' them new fusion reactors.

about a week ago
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Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

roc97007 Re:lost password process as an attack vector (546 comments)

This is not secure.

Sure it is.

My first car was your mom, and my favorite animal is a head of lettuce.

I do that too, with even more obscure answers, but let's face it; most people will answer the questions honestly.

about a week ago
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Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

roc97007 Re:lost password process as an attack vector (546 comments)

" your password recovery phrase will be the street you lived on in high school or the name of your first dog. This is not secure" if the email account it sends the password to has already been compromised.

So you use a secure random string for your email (I do) and they also have a password recovery system that's easy to social engineer. And if you're lucky that only goes to another email (rinse, repeat) or to a text on your cell phone... See today's /. article on cell phones being hacked.

about a week ago
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The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

roc97007 Re:logical error (622 comments)

And besides, the behind the scenes photos of her getting painted up as Mystique were more attractive than the ill-lit snaps she sexted. Have some taste, girl.

about a week ago
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Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

roc97007 Re:Oh great (546 comments)

In theory it is, but in practice "Love is beautiful, like birds that sing." is more likely to show up in a dictionary attack than a random string of gibberish. Just because it's nearly impossible to brute force doesn't mean it's necessarily a good password. Popular pharses, lyrics, Bible verses, etc can be substituted in a guessing algorithm just like using "$" instead of "S". Here's an interesting article about some of that:
http://arstechnica.com/securit...

Perhaps, but I think that's why the xkcd comic stipulated four random words. It's the human mind's ability to see patterns or visualizations in words ("It's a battery staple!" "Correct!") that makes such phrases easy to remember.

I agree that common phrases may not be good choices. But I'm pretty sure that "gopher banana rim plunger" would be fairly immune to attack, although perhaps unpleasant to visualize.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Google Latitude leaves Google Maps, will be turned off August 9

roc97007 roc97007 writes  |  about a year ago

roc97007 (608802) writes "According to Cnet (and notifications to google users) Google Latitude is no longer part of Maps and will be turned off August 9. The functionality will be incorporated into Google+. Is this a natural progression or an effort to increase participation in Plus? Will users migrate to Plus, or switch to competing platforms like Life 360?

I used to use Latitude to track my daughter's whereabouts, first as a child while on vacations, and again when she first started driving solo, and having it directly incorporated into Maps was a plus. But now that she's on her own my use case has gone away, so I'm ambivalent about this. Others might feel differently."
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Malware causes fatal plane crash

roc97007 roc97007 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

roc97007 (608802) writes "As if you needed another reason not to get on the plane: Malware, possibly from an infected USB stick, caused a fatal crash of Spanair flight 5022. From the article:

  Authorities investigating the 2008 crash of Spanair flight 5022 have discovered a central computer system used to monitor technical problems in the aircraft was infected with malware.

An internal report issued by the airline revealed the infected computer failed to detect three technical problems with the aircraft, which if detected, may have prevented the plane from taking off, according to reports in the Spanish newspaper, El Pais."

Link to Original Source
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Yorke says music industry on verge of collapse

roc97007 roc97007 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

roc97007 (608802) writes "Thom Yorke cautions up and coming musicians not to sign traditional record deals because the industry could collapse within months.

From the article: "It will be only a matter of time — months rather than years — before the music business establishment completely folds. (It will be) no great loss to the world.""

Link to Original Source

Journals

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First week on company iPhone

roc97007 roc97007 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

A week ago, my team received their new company iPhones. For the first few days, lots of playing, exploring, downloading of apps, taking pictures, putting funny faces on them, showing off various discoveries.

Today was the first team meeting since the iPhones were delivered. It wasn't pretty.

One team member has already traded in his for a Motorola Razr because "it will receive calls". Another says she keeps hers in Edge mode normally, so the phone will work, switching to G3 only when she needs to be on the internet. Another guy forwarded his iPhone to his private cell and uses the iPhone as a rather expensive iPod. The recently released firmware update made no noticeably difference to the reception issues. Our program manager described trying to make a call as "hello? I'd like to... damn" (redial) "Hello? I'd like... damn" (redial) "Hello? damn" (redial).

Other gripes -- Rapid battery death in GPS mode. The camera isn't as good as the one in the company-issued Blackberry. (2.0 Mp vs 3.0 Mp). No flash. No video capabilities. No MMS. Awkward file management. One person said "Once you get past the flashy interface, you realize the guts are five or six years old".

Early adopters. Don't you love 'em.

But seriously, I'm glad there are people out there who will put up with teething issues as the necessary price of being the first to have something shiny and new. I think the concept has merit, and will be glad to "drink the Kool-Aid" as the detractors put it, when the time is right. Which isn't now. My phone, is, like, my phone. First and foremost, it has to work as a phone. The rest is cake.

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Are the number of MS licenses significantly overreported?

roc97007 roc97007 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Yesterday I was helping move around some desktop and laptop machines at work, and noticed for the first time that every one of these units had an official Microsoft sticker with a Windows license key, the great majority of which were for Windows Home Edition, which we do not use at work. (We only use XP Professional or Windows Server.)

I asked around, and apparently all those Home Edition licenses are legitimate; they are part of the cost of the unit. The company then stages the disk with the copy of windows for which we have a corporate license.

I haven't checked yet, but I suspect the latest hardware come with a Vista Home Basic license, which is then re-imaged with corporate XP Pro. (I will check this and update as necessary.)

I'm wondering -- doesn't this effectively double the number of licenses that Microsoft can claim to have sold, at least for corporate customers?

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