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Seagate Bulks Up With New 8 Terabyte 'Archive' Hard Drive

rrohbeck Re:Just in time. (219 comments)

You need N+2 redundancy for large drives. RAID1 or RAID5 will lead to data loss with good probability when a drive has failed, needs to be rebuilt and you get read errors on the remaining drives. The raw read error rate has been unchanged ar 10^-14 despite huge capacity growth.

5 days ago
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Stars Traveling Close To Light Speed Could Spread Life Through the Universe

rrohbeck Re:Life? (184 comments)

Yeah, I'd like to see some matter from that star or system interact with something else at "normal" galactic speeds. That would be awesome, space opera stuff a la Doc Smith. A meteor or asteroid at 1/3rd c? Randall Munroe should look into this.

about two weeks ago
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Football Concussion Lawsuits Start To Hit High Schools

rrohbeck Re:That's going to be tricky to wiggle out of... (233 comments)

Haha. I stayed at a hotel with a golf course once (I don't play golf) and every guest had to acknowledge in writing that walking outside when golfers are present is inherently dangerous and that the hotel is not liable if you're hit by a ball.

about three weeks ago
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Black Friday '14: E-commerce Pages Far Slower Than They Were in 2013

rrohbeck Jeez, NewEgg (143 comments)

I gave up browsing at some point, it was so bad. Amazon was a bit slow but worked OK.

about three weeks ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

rrohbeck Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (215 comments)

"Access time"="time from sending the request until data starts to flow." For 1,000 times the IOPS the transfer rate and overhead on the bus would have to scale by three orders of magnitude too, which they don't.

about three weeks ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

rrohbeck Re:Slashdot promised 110 Ghz 12 years ago (215 comments)

Not really. There are a couple of developed nations that still have a high birth rate which shows that reduced fertility is not an automatic byproduct of developmnt. The current UN forecast is 11 billion in the early 22nd century. I think mother nature will have something to say about that.

about three weeks ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

rrohbeck Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (215 comments)

I have several VMs on my system that each need at least a half TB to be useful (better a full TB.) A local cache of our SVN repo is again a couple 100 GB. Next, backups of my other systems, each a couple 100 GB at least. Next, a mirror of my server at work - nearly another TB or so. And a couple movie downloads that I haven't watched yet. Voila, over 5TB.

about three weeks ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

rrohbeck Re:Slashdot promised 110 Ghz 12 years ago (215 comments)

For some reason extrapolating exponential growth is very popular in certain circles. I assume that's because it detracts from other areas of exponential growth, like total population, energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Singularity, here we come!

about three weeks ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

rrohbeck Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (215 comments)

There was an article recently (can't remember where) that made the case that with slowing density increase the lifetime of HDDs has to increase because you're not going to replace them after two or three years anyway because the next generation is so much better. Much better MTBF is clearly possible - just look at HGST versus the rest in the Backblaze reports.

Yup, in large arrays the trend is to go beyond RAID6 - see e.g. NetApp's DDP. Too bad there's so little technical info available about it.

about three weeks ago
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Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

rrohbeck Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (215 comments)

WTF? HDDs have seek times in the milliseconds while total access time for SSDs is in the microseconds.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

rrohbeck Re:Super-capitalism (516 comments)

The metropolitan areas of the US have the same population density as Europe.

about three weeks ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

rrohbeck Re:Really? (438 comments)

There's a significant effect though: The market for lower capacity HDDs has disappeared, and with it much of the volume so the HDD manufacturers have to make their margins at the higher end. 1TB HDDs are an endangered species now because you can get a 120GB SSD for the same price and many consumers don't need 1TB while they appreciate the performance of an SSD.

about three weeks ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

rrohbeck Re:LOL (438 comments)

Moore's law has been dead for years. It applied to Flash only in the beginning and the cells have reached physical limits, that's why it's only about cramming more cells into a package today.

about three weeks ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

rrohbeck Re:LOL (438 comments)

When I started university the central ICL 1906 mainframe had 384 K words of core, and a year or two later we upgraded to 512KW (24 bit each) of "solid state" memory with the unbelievable access time of 0.3 microseconds. The paging devices were drums because of their much lower latencies compared to disk drives - we had quite a few drums with a couple MB. No mercury delay lines but the VDU display memory was coax delay lines. At least we didn't have to submit our programs on punch cards like the ME and EE peons - we were CS so we had *online* access!

about three weeks ago
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Attack of the One-Letter Programming Languages

rrohbeck One letter? (127 comments)

Here I was wondering how to program with one letter where even Brainfuck needs several.

about three weeks ago
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"Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" Pulled From Amazon

rrohbeck Re:Well, to be fair... (561 comments)

There was an insanely pretty and tall woman with long blond hair in some of my MSCS courses. Way out of my league...

about a month ago
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"Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" Pulled From Amazon

rrohbeck Re:So close, so far (561 comments)

OMFG, Kosmos still exists? I had several of those about 40 years ago. But then I also had their electronics sets so that's where I ended up.

about a month ago
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"Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" Pulled From Amazon

rrohbeck Re:From Experience (561 comments)

1)get a hot chick to put together jugsaw puzzles on youtube.

I don't think you can have hardcore gore horror on Youtube.

about a month ago

Submissions

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ACTA is back

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "From eff.org:

The shadow of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is back in Europe. It is disguised as CETA, the Canada-European Union and Trade Agreement.

A comparison of the leaked draft Canada-EU agreement shows the treaty includes a number of the same controversial provisions, specifically concerning criminal enforcement, private enforcement by Internet Service Providers (ISPs), and harsh damages."

Link to Original Source
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The $25/£15 computer from the UK

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "Electronics Weekly brings us a report on the Raspberry Pi, a computer the size of a USB stick with USB (for keyboard/mouse/network/storage), composite/HDMI video out and power connectors and a memory card slot. It runs a 700MHz ARM11 with 256MB of memory and is designed as a teaching tool, envisioned to boot Ubuntu right into interactive Python like the BASIC computers that got many of us hooked on programming.
There is a lot of interest from developing countries and chances are that there will be a buy one, give one program.

"There is an energy barrier at the start of the learning curve," said Upton. With the Spectrum or the BBC micro, even if you only wanted it to run a game, you turned it on and it immediately said 'BASIC' and you could write
>10 print "Hello world"
>20 goto 10.
A lot of us got sucked in by that and became programmers."

PCs just don't cut the mustard."

Link to Original Source
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Apple engineer builds Antikythera out of Legos

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  about 4 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "SciAm brings us a truly nerdy story: 'Videographer John Pavlus spent much of 2010 writing and shooting a video about an Apple engineer, Andy Carol, who designed and built a fully functional eclipse-predicting machine, a replica of an ancient Greek device, out of 1,500 Lego Technic parts and 110 gears.'"
Link to Original Source
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4KB disk sectors are coming

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  about 5 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "Anandtech brings us an article about WD's campaign to increase disk drive sector size to 4KB, and the reasons behind it. They are basically better format efficiency, better error correction, and less overhead everywhere. Every modern OS uses at least 4KB block sizes, but some may create misaligned partitions, making the use of alignment tools or even 512B sector emulation necessary.
Now when we re-align everything, can we please think of SSDs too and align partitions and everything else on at least 1MB boundaries?

It's been a long time coming — I remember talk about this from 5 years ago or so."

Link to Original Source
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Amazon US refunds Windows license fee too

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "Today Amazon credited my card with $65.45.

After ordering an Eee PC 1005 HA from amazon.com, I asked them for a refund for the cost of Windows XP via the "Contact us" form. At first they told me to cancel any items on my order that I wanted a refund for, but after I explained that XP was preinstalled on the machine they got it. They asked what the cost of the OS was, and I answered that I had no idea but that Amazon UK refunded GBP 40.00. Within a few hours I got a response saying "I've requested a refund of $65.45 to your Visa card."

Somehow I doubt that Amazon will charge Asus or even Microsoft, but maybe they will one day if more people do this.

Eeebuntu 3.01 doesn't have network (wired or wireless) drivers for the new generation of Eee PCs, but Karmic Alpha-3 does and looks quite good already. I love the Launcher! Now let's see how long the battery will last if I run Linux only off the SDHC card and don't spin the hard drive much. Voila, poor man's SSD.

Oh and peeling off the "Designed for Microsoft Windows XP" sticker is easy too."
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Snakes on a plane... for real

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "The BBC reports, "An Australian airliner was grounded after four baby pythons escaped from their container in the aircraft's hold."

Passengers were transferred to another aircraft and the plane was fumigated. How boring. They should have called Samuel L. Jackson."
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British teen 'saved by Facebook'

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "Police saved a 16-year-old with a drug overdose after he announced his suicide on Facebook.

From the the BBC:
'A British teenager who took a drugs overdose has been saved after the American girl he was chatting to online raised the alarm.
The 16-year-old boy from Oxfordshire had sent her a message suggesting he intended to commit suicide.'

The girl in Maryland told her parents, who called the police, who went from the White House via the UK embassy to local UK police in Abingdon, Oxfordshire. They found the teen in the fourth house they checked."
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YouTube music videos blocked in the UK

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "The BBC reports:

"YouTube is blocking all premium music videos to UK users after failing to reach a new licensing agreement with the Performing Right Society (PRS).
Thousands of videos will be unavailable to YouTube users from later on Monday."

So I guess they'd rather have no licensing revenue from YouTube and force UK users to learn about proxies and P2P."
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Forry Ackerman dead at 92

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  about 6 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "Forrest J Ackerman, the "world's biggest fan", literary agent for names like Isaac Asimov, A.E. van Vogt, or Hugo Gernsback, writer of over 2,000 articles and short stories, and creator of the term sci-fi, died at the age of 92. In recent years he had to sell the "Ackermansion" and most of the about 300,000 items of memorabilia it stored due to mounting health bills. The LA Times prints an obituary today."
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Site against California's Prop 8 being DoS'd

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "A site against California's Proposition 8 (Gay marriage ban) is apparently being subjected to a DoS attack.

eqca.org reports:
SACRAMENTO — 10/30/08 — Today the NO on Prop 8 campaign's Web site (http://www.noonprop8.com/) was the victim of what appears to be a coordinated attack designed to bring the system down. According to http://www.calitics.com/, the denial-of-service attack (DoS) on the NO on Prop 8 website occurred before 11:30pm, Wednesday, October 29th and coincides with a similar attack on Florida's NO on 2 campaign, the Constitutional Amendment Against Marriage Equality.

Alexa shows a huge rise in traffic over the last few days."
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Senator Ted Stevens guilty on all counts

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "Senator Ted "Tubes" Stevens was found guilty on all counts today.

USA Today writes:
'Sen. Ted Stevens, the legendary Republican senator who is affectionately known as Uncle Ted to Alaskans, was found guilty Monday of failing to disclose more than $250,000 in gifts.

The verdict, delivered by a jury 3,300 miles from his home in Girdwood, Alaska, comes just eight days before Election Day, when Stevens was hoping to win re-election to an eighth term.'"
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Vanadium batteries for renewable energy

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "Compensating for the intermittent nature of wind and solar power needs conventional power plants to fill the gaps or large scale energy storage like hydroelectric.
Large batteries, for example based on the sodium-sulfur system are an alternative. Discover magazine runs an article on recent improvements with the vanadium redox battery, which is another system that can provide MW/MWh batteries. The smallest ones are "closet" size, so don't count on them for cars — yet, but they could be an option for UPSs too."
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North pole might be ice free this summer

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rrohbeck (944847) writes "The north pole might be without ice for the first time this summer, reports The Independent. 'It seems unthinkable, but for the first time in human history, ice is on course to disappear entirely from the North Pole this year.'
'Seasoned polar scientists believe the chances of a totally ice-free North Pole this summer are greater than 50:50 because the normally thick ice formed over many years at the Pole has been blown away and replaced by huge swathes of thinner ice formed over a single year.'
Although melting of floating ice doesn't increase sea level, it's a sign of major thawing in the arctic, and 'If it happens, it raises the prospect of the Arctic nations being able to exploit the valuable oil and mineral deposits [...] which have until now been impossible to extract because of the thick sea ice above.'"
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The brightest Gamma Ray Burst ever

rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rrohbeck writes "The universe honored Arthur C. Clarke's death on March 19 with a record number of Gamma Ray Bursts overall and the brightest GRB ever observed: GRB 080319B.
At a distance of about 7.5 billion light years, the associated explosion was the farthest object ever visible to the naked eye for a short time and the intrinsically brightest.
Space.com has an article about the event detected by NASA's SWIFT satellite and observed by many others."
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rrohbeck rrohbeck writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rrohbeck writes "The New York Times has a story on what Blue Origin, [Amazon.com founder] Jeff Bezos' space company is up to after his Texas land grab. A couple of Flash videos show a short successful test hop of the "Goddard" test vehicle.

The Goddard has a science-fiction sleekness. Videos show the craft taking off and landing again with a loud whooshing sound. In one view, one of the nine rocket nozzles jitters as it maintains the ship's attitude. Goddard resembles the DC-X, another vertical-takeoff-and-landing craft under development in the 1990s by McDonnell Douglas for the Defense Department and NASA until the government pulled the plug.
And in case you're an aerospace engineer, they're hiring."

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