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Google's Mayer Says Personalization is Key To Future Search

rsmiller510 Re:Sorry, I choose to "personalize" your ideas awa (93 comments)

I just report and discuss what I see and hear and react to it, but I do think the semantic web, whatever it turns out to be, will have some impact on the future of content delivery and of search. I don't think you have to concern yourself with this just yet. As Mayer said, if you bothered read the post, that this is her 2020 prediction, a ways away just yet and lot of technology hurdles to overcome. You have every right to be skeptical, but this is just one person from one company talking and it doesn't necessarily mean this is how it's going to play out.

more than 5 years ago
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Google's Mayer Says Personalization is Key To Future Search

rsmiller510 Re:Semantic Search != Personalisation (93 comments)

With all due respect, I don't think I misunderstand it at all. Part of semantic search and semantic content delivery (which are linked) is to understand about the user and deliver the content that matters most to them. While I agree it has to do with programatically delivering content based on lots of contextual clues, it also is about pinpointing the responses and the content you show for any given user, rather than pretending that you can have one-size-fits all content. Ron Miller

more than 5 years ago
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Google's Mayer Says Personalization is Key To Future Search

rsmiller510 Editor's Added Comments Are Not Quite Correct (93 comments)

I submitted this piece and while Mayer discussed the Search Wiki, this is not what I was referring to. If you fast forward to around the 16 or 17 minute mark of the video, Mayer begins a discussion of the future of search, 10-20 years out where she talks about personalization, modes and media as three pillars of future search. It is this part of the discussion that I focus on in my post. The Search Wiki actually has nothing to do with this.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Spain's Link Tax Taxes My Patience

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 4 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Spain's new tax on linking to Spanish newspaper articles is ill defined and short sighted and ends up protecting a dying industry, while undermining a vibrant one. In another case of disrupted industries turning to lawmakers to solve their problems, this one makes no sense at all, especially given the state of the Spanish economy and the fact that it comes 15 years too late to even matter."
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A curmudgeonly view of Yo

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 5 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Yo, an application that simply lets you call your followers with a "Yo" and nothing else has somehow inexplicably captured the imagination of press and public alike this week, reaching the heady territory of a million downloads, but I'm here to tell you this little baby is just a flash in the pan. And by the way, you there, get the hell off my lawn with your smartphone."
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Box can no longer play the underdog -- and that's bad news

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 8 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "For years, Box has played the role of the innovative and disruptive startup, but being plucky and forcing the big guys to do business differently isn't gong to be enough moving forward. When Box filed its S-1 this week, it moved into new territory and it's going to be tough to play the role of plucky upstart once it's a publicly traded company, but it's no easier to transform into a mature stand-alone cloud vendor where very soon investors are going to want to see profits and results.."
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Let's put an end to the cloud-mainframe comparisons

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 8 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "There was an SNL skit in the 1990s with Mike Myers called If it’s not Scottish, it’s crap, and when people mixed up Scotland and Ireland, he would angrily point to a map and say “There’s Ireland! There’s Scotland! There’s the bloody sea! They’re different!” I feel that way when I hear old-school IT pros try to argue that the cloud is just an update of mainframe time-sharing. They're different and it's time we put that argument to rest."
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Just when you thought IT was safe again, here come the wearables

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 8 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Wearables are a brand spanking new area in technology, so much so you probably have yet to see them show up in your business, but chances are at some point, some C-level executive is going to want help connecting his fitness band to his laptop and when he does...boom!...you'll have entered the age of wearables without even knowing it. Over time, we'll start to see these devices move from their current consumer focus to more practical business applications, and while this might feel like it's far off into the future, it's probably going to happen sooner than you think."
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The sign of a mature mobile strategy: Agility trumps security every time

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 9 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "It may seem counterintuitive at first to IT pros trained to think security first, but speakers on a panel at Mobile World Congress last week agreed that in order to achieve the agility benefits that a good enterprise mobile app can bring, the company may have to put business benefits ahead of security. That's not to say that security doesn't matter, but it can't be so important that it stifles the benefits the mobile app can offer an organization. And in fact, all organizations go through a defined maturity pattern where they start with security first and gradually realize that mobile is not only about security. Once they see the light, it's only then they can reap the benefits of moving a business process to a mobile context."
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IBM researcher: Companies won't invest in data privacy until society demands it

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 9 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Of course we have the ability today to collect all kinds of data on people, but what we lack is the art of subtlety when it comes to using that data to understand people better and give a personalized experience that feels amazing instead of creepy. IBM researcher Marie Wallace says that as a society we are far behind our abilities to collect and process data, and we need to demand data privacy so that our politicians and the companies we frequent online will take us seriously. But do we have the gumption to ask?"
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Android can't escape the Pandora's Box of openness

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 9 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "As a large company with a target on its back, Google has to walk a fine line when it comes to Android. That's because when it made Android open source, it left it vulnerable to forking where it could eventually lose control of its own project. It's an issue Oracle has faced in the past and one Google has to be wary of even if as a mature OS, it's more difficult to pull off at scale."
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Why a Google Ethics commission is an oxymoron

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 10 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Ah, you have to love Google. After people raised concerns about its purchase of Deep Mind, an artificial intelligence company, Google reportedly responded by saying it would form an ethics commission to make sure that all of Google's artificial intelligence research was on the up and up. Excuse me while I spit out my coffee, but Google and ethics go together about as well the House Intelligence Committee. Which of these things is not like the other and who in their right mind is going to trust Google to be self-policing on anything, never mind AI?"
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Why VMware just spent $1.54 billion on AirWatch

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 10 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "By now you've heard the news that VMware spent $1.54 billion to purchase AirWatch, but the real story isn't that they did it, but why they did it and what that means to the mobile device management market. It's worth noting, for instance that this is the fourth deal by a large company for an MDM vendor in the last year or so, but this one's a little different because AirWatch is the belle of the ball and the one company with a significant customer base and that's actually making money. And you can be sure that there are big companies out there pausing this morning and seeing which players are left on the board."
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To get data to work for you, package it like the big data companies

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 10 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Just about every company by now understands the power of big data to help transform decision making, but it's much harder to take all that information and present it in a way that makes sense and allows you to put it to work. You could actually learn a lot about how to do this by mimicking how big data companies package and sell their data and apply these same principles to create packages of data to help lines of business answer key questions about marketing, sales, R&D and other key business areas."
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Moving beyond Snowden, what kind of country does America want to be

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 10 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "We've pretty much exhausted the Edward Snowden debate. You may think he's a hero or a villain, but whatever you think you can't undo what he did. The genie is out of the bottle and we now what we know about the extent of government surveillance. We can't pretend we don't, so the time has come to debate the issues and figure just what level of surveillance is required to make us safe --and if we can do it within the rule of law or continue to give security apparatus carte blance to monitor anyone's activities at any time, regardless of whether they are suspected of a crime or not."
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iOS is the most lucrative mobile OS of them all

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about 10 months ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "It's not exactly news that iOS users are more active than Android users. Several studies have shown this over the years including the most recent data from IBM from the holiday shopping season, but does that same gap exist when people move from the consumer side to work? I thought it was at least worth exploring that questions. Here's what I found."
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Apple's iPhone 5C strategy is working just as it was supposed to

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about a year ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Apple was never going to be a low-end phone company. It just doesn't fit in with their company culture and product mentality, but they knew they had to at least come up with a mid-range phone that would lure some Android customers, particularly Samsung loyalists, to the Apple ecosystem. The 5C was a kind of compromise for them. It was a lower end phone without being a cheap phone and the idea was to add some customers who couldn't afford an iPhone in the past. Some new data suggests the iPhone 5C might not be selling like hot cakes, but it is drawing in that very type of customer Apple was hoping for, and from that perspective, the strategy is working according to plan."
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Customers are in control, so companies need to get smart

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  about a year ago

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Remember everything you learned in college about marketing? Well forget it. Today the relationship between marketing and customers has been flipped upside down and the customer is firmly in charge. That means preaching to them isn't going to get you anywhere. It requires an organized and intelligent approach to marketing where you engage them on social media on their terms, and you give them the information they need in the context of whatever they're doing and whatever device they happen to be on. It's a huge challenge and most companies just aren't doing a very good job yet."
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Here's what happened when an iPhone loyalist tried a Nexus 5 | CITEworld

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  1 year,1 day

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "I've been using iPhones since I've been using smart phones. That goes back to the 2008 timeframe, so I thought it would be interesting to find out how it feels to use a high end Android phone, the new Nexus 5 running the Kitkat Android OS. One thing I learned is that a phone is a phone and that all the passion people waste on one OS or another is a bit ridiculous. Use what you want to use. Not sure why people have to go war over it. Anyway, here's what I learned."
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The Cloud upended IT procurement --and it's never going back

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  1 year,8 days

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Once upon a time if you wanted a server for your project, you begged to IT, and if you were lucky in 6 or 8 weeks, maybe you would have access to it. The cloud changed all that because with a service like Amazon Web Services, you can now provision a low-cost server environment with a credit card in about 90 seconds.

And the same goes for software. Thanks to open source and apps, we can get the software we need for free or very low cost and we don't have to ask IT permission or use the klunky, awful enterprise variety they always buy. This ability to procure our own stuff has forever changed the relationship between IT and end users, and I hate to tell you, but it's never going back."

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Time to forgive Ed Snowden and let him come home

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  1 year,11 days

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "When Edward Snowden began showing us the extent of the US surveillance state back and in June, he was doing us a huge favor. He peeled back that curtain and let us see exactly what our government was doing, and in the process, while he surely embarrassed US officials, he didn't reveal any US government secrets that put US security at risk. For that reason, Snowden should be allowed to come back home without fear of retribution to testify before Congress, so that we can discuss these issues in the open and find the level of surveillance we are willing to tolerate in a free society in the name of keeping us safe."
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Stop listening to your users

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  1 year,12 days

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "It would seem on its face that simply asking your users what they need in an app would be the easiest way to build one, but it turns out it's not quite that simple. People often don't know what they want or need or they can't articulate it in a way that's useful to you. They may say I want Google or Dropbox for the enterprise, but they don't get that developers can be so much more creative than that. And the best way to understand those users' needs is to watch what they do, then use your own skills to build apps to make their working lives better or easier."
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What if one tech company won the clash of the Tech Titans?

rsmiller510 rsmiller510 writes  |  1 year,22 days

rsmiller510 (1051940) writes "Imagine one tech company --whether Facebook, Google, Apple, Amazon or Microsoft --won the battle of the tech titans and in the darkness bound us. Such is the premise of Dave Egger's latest novel, The Circle. As it turns out, it's a pretty lousy book, but it raises some interesting points about unrestrained power --and as you can imagine it's not pretty. The dystopian tale lets us follow the company from vaguely sinister to downright despotic, a scenario you would think would be interesting. Unfortunately, the author lacked one key ingredient: a good story."
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