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Prison Cell Phone Smuggling Out of Control

rudeboy1 Re:Cell Phone Jammers? (428 comments)

...Or you could just install a Faraday cage (or metallic paint) inside prisoner cells. I would think a 5 sided coating (plus coating on the bars) would eliminate most of the signal, depending on the direction of the cell tower. I don't know much about the effects of metallic paint on cell signal, but I would guess signal reflection would do more damage than absorption (if it works anything like 802.11 networks). In which case, 5 way reflection should be sufficient.

more than 3 years ago
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The Matrix Re-Reloaded

rudeboy1 Re:No. (640 comments)

I agree with this... except for the fact that this story came about when Keanu said he was on board for it. He's DEAD in the third film. I guess he can be digital only, but even the digital version of him blew up with all the other Smiths. I guess the 01 city backup tapes are pretty thorough...

more than 3 years ago
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DVD-CSS's Encryption Not Enough? Here Comes DECE

rudeboy1 Re:I don't want physical copies anymore (361 comments)

You may be on to the root cause here. Disney has successfully marketed 50 year old movies for consistent new sales through this "vault" tactic. It makes sense, particularly if, quite frankly, your best intellectual property was created before we put a man on the moon.

This new DECE system would put a stop to that. At first I thought Disney may be trying to put themselves on the ethical side of the argument. Now I'm thinking they're just trying to protect their best interest. Either way, if their holding out on this, it's OK in my book, whatever their motivation.

more than 4 years ago
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Stephen Hawking Is "Very Ill" In Hospital

rudeboy1 Re:Oh dear (413 comments)

Fail.
There have been numerous interviews with Hawking and other scientists, mathematicians, physicists, etc. that reference "god" as an unknown quantity in the face of stupendous data. Not to be confused with a deity. Einstein also wrote about "god" in this same reference, and he was a very well known atheist.

more than 5 years ago
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Appeals Court Stays RIAA Subpoena

rudeboy1 Re:This could be big (78 comments)

I wish I was a better student, and could make it through law school. I think I would love to practice the kind of law that you do. As it stands, I'm just an IT guy, and IT certifications are about as much structured schooling as I can make it through at one time. Ah, to stand up for the little guy. I salute you, sir.

more than 5 years ago
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What Has Fox Got Against Its Own Sci-Fi Shows?

rudeboy1 Re:DVR (753 comments)

I agree with this. If it weren't for my DVR, I would never have even known the new season of Sarah Connor had started. That has less to do with my viewing habits, and more to do with a crappy job of promoting the show.

Fox is generally on my shit list for this. I might have been the only person to arrange my schedule around so I could watch Drive (Nathon Fillion. Come ON!). They went on a break, and never came back. I gave serious thought to catching a plane so I could put a brick through the window of Fox corporate office. Sarah Connor Chronicles is one of the few shows on network TV that I watch. Dollhouse is on the list because it's Joss Whedon, and it's something the girlfriend and I can sit and watch together. Outside of that, though, it's all cable stuff, mostly Discovery channel stuff (Dirty Jobs FTW. Mike Rowe is my own personal Jesus (pronouncing that with a silent J makes it funnier given the subject matter)).

My point is, Fox has a hold on my household watching habits, and if it continues to take otherwise good shows and cancel them (or screw them over to the point where they get cancelled), then I'm sure I'm not the only person who will stop allowing themselves to be jerked around, and move exclusively over to cable, where the show schedulers tend not to be complete idiots.

more than 5 years ago
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Norton Users Worried By PIFTS.exe, Stonewalling By Symantec

rudeboy1 Re:They used to get it. (685 comments)

I just realized how astroturf-y that sounded. My apologies. I think I need a bath now.

more than 5 years ago
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Norton Users Worried By PIFTS.exe, Stonewalling By Symantec

rudeboy1 Re:They used to get it. (685 comments)

I googled some of these suggestions, and came out with another choice. When searching reviews for Avast and Antivir, it seems that a product called BitDefender tops the ratings whenever it is compared to these others. I didn't see anything negative on Google about it. Anyone tried it?

more than 5 years ago
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Norton Users Worried By PIFTS.exe, Stonewalling By Symantec

rudeboy1 Re:They used to get it. (685 comments)

As you seem to be fairly experienced in such matters, what would you suggest as an alternative client for Windows systems? My old IT job used to run McAfee as part of their standard image, and I hated dealing with it. Norton always seemed like the lesser of those two evils, but in the last few years, their interface has gotten ridiculously huge, and now is filed in my mind as bloatware.

On my home machine, I just built a dual quad-core Xeon (I do a lot of recording/post production on the side from the day job), so while resources are not much of a concern (still seeing a bit of a bottleneck under heavy loads from my SATA HDs, should have sprung for the SSD. :) ), I'd still like to find a streamlined client that will do AV/spyware, with the automatic updates I've grown accustomed to in Norton/McAfee products. Suggestions?

more than 5 years ago
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Combining BitTorrent With Darknets For P2P Privacy

rudeboy1 Better than TorrentPrivacy? (325 comments)

I was reading about TorrentPrivacy last week, and it sounded nice, except the site gave me a heavy "fishy" vibe, and they charge a fee for their service.

I'm reading up on OneSwarm, but I don't know enough about the technology to know if this works the same way, or better than TP. Any thoughts?

more than 5 years ago
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Pirate Bay P2P Trial Begins In Sweden

rudeboy1 Re:A Strawman for the Symptom (723 comments)

Unless this place has a sniper with a tranq rifle sitting above the screen to take down self-absorbed jackasses talking during the movie, I don't think it will help. There's a nifty arts cinema that recently started playing about half mainstream stuff here in town. It's on the other side of town from me, but I'll go for the smaller theater size, better concession options (white chocolate popcorn FTW) and the ability to bring in drinks from the attached bar. However, that said, I still have a consistant track record of people kicking my seat, talking during the movie, or texting someone every 5 minutes, and holding the phone screen-out so I know when they have a text message before they do.

I just spent my tax rebate on about $2K worth of computer equipment, otherwise I'd be investing in home theater stuff. Which is more than likely what I'll be doing with my rebate next year. I have a nice shotgun room in my basement (about 10 feet by 30 feet) that will make for a perfect home theater. All I have to do is waterproof the basement (or water-resist, as I have been learning), throw up some drywall and carpet, and the rest is just the equipment I need to simulate a trip to the cinema. A nice projector and sound system, and my file server with all of the movies I might or might not have sits right on the other side of the wall. I think more people will be doing this in the future, as the combination of better/cheaper components mixes with the further proliferation of electronic compies of movies.

more than 5 years ago
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Pirate Bay P2P Trial Begins In Sweden

rudeboy1 Re:A Strawman for the Symptom (723 comments)

I couldn't agree more. The last 3 movies I've seen in a theater were without exception ruined by either other movie-goers, or another factor like idiotic theater staff or sticky floors. I LOVE movies, but I'm almost to the point of swearing off going to the cinema.

I might or might not pirate movies from time to time, but if I did, the vast majority of them would be movies I've seen before, usually in the theater. While I wouldn't be paying for these hypothetical movies, it is a matter of convenient acquisition of movies, so that I can access them anytime I want and watch them at my convenience.

I DO pay for a Netflix subscription. Which, when combined with my XBox, allows me to access a lot of movies at almost the same convenience factor of the ones sitting on my hard drive. This is an example of turning someone who might or might not have pilfered the occasional torrented movie into someone paying a fair price for a fair shake. Netflix does include a measure of DRM, essentially making it impossible (that I am aware of) to copy the streamed moves to disc- or if you can, it would equate to copying a song off the radio-post stream and all that. However, Netflix applies this DRM without making me feel like a criminal for trying to access my content in a normal manner.

This is the ONLY example of a major media outlet actually taking advantage of new technologies to expand their offerings. But I think that has a large part to do with the fact that Netflix IS the new technology. I'm sure Blockbuster would love to claim the part of the victim of new technology of they had a foot to stand on. From what I hear, they are circling the drain these days as a direct result of Netflix' market share.

more than 5 years ago
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Pirate Bay P2P Trial Begins In Sweden

rudeboy1 Re:Free Lunch (723 comments)

They're called patents. If you make a nickel off everyone who uses your formula or proof, you're in the same boat as the rest of these cats.

more than 5 years ago
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Pirate Bay P2P Trial Begins In Sweden

rudeboy1 Hoping their go-to mantra holds out (723 comments)

As I understand it, TPB has long held that the website does not contain any copyrighted material, and that they don't distribute any copyrighted material. I guess what I'm getting is that the prosecution is trying to prove that pointing out the location of copyrighted material is a crime.

Given that corporate greed is a constant, (as evidenced by the US banks, who hoarde bailout money and spend it on sports stadium naming rights in the face of imminent economic collapse) I see this snowballing to the point where companies that manufacture software, like BitTorrent and Azureus will soon come under fire. They tried this with the gun industry, and have had mixed results for years. I think it's rediculous that you should be held accountable for someone potentially doing something illegal with the software you designed in good faith, and under the allowance of current law. It's an erosion of rights thorugh corporate lobbying that leads to this sort of behavior. As others have stated, artists won't see any extra income if bittorrent traffic in its entirety (not at stake in this trial, I know) comes to a halt. In fact,there is a good chance, I think, that the media companies pushing this witch hunt will find that even if they were somehow successful in completely ceasing all P2P trading of their content, they would not see any increase in revenue. To the contrary, the large population of people that hear about an artist via the medium will no longer have access to this method, and the proliferation of new music will slow down considerably, fueled only by expensive promoting methods. If the media companies want their 1970's revenues back, so be it. But I think they're also looking at 1970's revenue minus the adjustment for inflation.

more than 5 years ago
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Circuit City Closes Its Doors For Good

rudeboy1 Re:More than mismanagement (587 comments)

Agreed. I bought some memory there a while back, through their in-store pickup option. I paid for it online, drove to the store, and had to wait 30 MINUTES for them to figure out how to process my order. Without exception, every time I went in to a Circuit City, I left disgusted and vowing to avoid shopping there again.

Incidentally, now that CC is closed, that mantle is being passed on to Fry's. The reps never know anything, assuming you can actually get one to help you, and they never have to part I'm looking for. It's either not stocked anymore, or they're always sold out of it. Sure it's fun to go in there and drool at the TVs, but I'm sticking to Newegg from now on.

more than 5 years ago
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Future Astronauts May Survive On Eating Silkworms

rudeboy1 Re:Potato Chips on a Sub (384 comments)

#$%^. Not enough coffee. 3 meals/day * 5 people * 365 days/year * 3 years is 16,425 meals. Definitely drives my point home a bit further.

more than 5 years ago
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Future Astronauts May Survive On Eating Silkworms

rudeboy1 Re:Potato Chips on a Sub (384 comments)

What you're not getting, is that they're concerned with finding a food source that can be replicated while en route to Mars. Say the Mars crew was 5 people strong. 3 years is 1095 days. For 5 people to eat 3 square meals a day, that's 5475 servings of food. Scratch that, not servings, but complete meals, which generally represent at least a couple servings of various food groups. The concern is that A.)You're packing a ton of extra weight that has to break Earth's gravity, and then adding in additional fuel to compensate, which then makes the craft even heavier. B.) That much food, even in compact forms like tuna cans and beef jerky, is still going to take a massive area just for storage. Again, extra weight added to craft for additional spacecraft real estate. C.)Survivability. Most of the foods you listed will not keep at room temperature for 3 years. Tuna, perhaps, but jerky, bagels, etc. Won't make it even close to that. You can freeze it, but this will also require extra gear, energy and materials to accomplish.

Now, if you were to introduce a renewable food source like the silk worm, most of those problems are reduced considerably. You leave orbit with only a seed population, and since their bodies, much like ours, are comprised mostly of water, it is not a straight equation of 1LB of worm food begets 1LB of worms. They eat leaves, which could theoretically also be grown using a minimum of resources, which only require light (free), water (recyclable) and soil (recyclable). Therefore you are netting a gain in food that is more than what you leave with from Earth.

I'm sure they will probably pack some regular food too, but likely more as an appeasement to keep the astronauts sane. It will be spaced out sparingly over a long ride, and is essentially a luxury. I view it a lot like the food situation in Firefly, where most of their diet is comprised from nondescript protein bars. If you didn't see the behind the scenes of them making those protein bars, I think you'd be looking at a very similar set of circumstances. Once the worms have been harvested, they can be processed any number of ways, including being refined and compacted into their most efficient form (bars). Then you add in a box of strawberries every now and then just to keep from going all bibbledy.

more than 5 years ago
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Intel Quad-Core Price and Performance Showdown

rudeboy1 Re:the computer is not just the cpu (115 comments)

Actually, I had to look that up recently. It's not 3GB, it's 4GB. Here comes the science:

"Microsoft Windows XP Professional, designed as a 32-bit OS, supports an address range of up to 4 GB for virtual memory addresses and up to 4 GB for physical memory addresses. Because the physical memory addresses are sub-divided to manage both the computer's PCI memory address range (also known as MMIO) and RAM, the amount of available RAM is always less than 4 GB.

The PCI memory addresses starting down from 4 GB are used for things like the BIOS, IO cards, networking, PCI hubs, bus bridges, PCI-Express, and video/graphics cards. The BIOS takes up about 512 KB starting from the very top address. Then each of the other items mentioned are allocated address ranges below the BIOS range. The largest block of addresses is allocated for today's high performance graphics cards which need addresses for at least the amount of memory on the graphics card. The net result is that a high performance x86-based computer may allocate 512 MB to more than 1 GB for the PCI memory address range before any RAM (physical user memory) addresses are allocated.

RAM starts from address 0. The BIOS allocates RAM from 0 up to the bottom of the PCI memory addresses mentioned above, typically limiting available RAM to between 3 GB and 3.4 GB."

I actually learned something last week, thought I'd pass it on...
*Cue the "The More You Know" logo*

more than 5 years ago
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Intel Quad-Core Price and Performance Showdown

rudeboy1 No Xeon? (115 comments)

Um, I'm sorry but isn't Xeon still an Intel brand? There are quite a few offerings in the Xeon line that are quad core. In fact, I'm building a Socket 771 machine now with dual Xeon procs, and was interested to see how the Xeon quad 2.5GHz was going to stack up, (what I can afford) but no. Fail.

more than 5 years ago
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Broadband Access Without the Pork?

rudeboy1 Re:some yes some no (412 comments)

AT&T UVerse does not require a phone line for DSL, though I believe you still have to purchase TV service.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Tesla Motors to Unveil New Sedan Today at 3:30 ET

rudeboy1 rudeboy1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rudeboy1 writes "Tesla Motors, makers of the all-electric $109,000 Tesla Roadster, will be annoucing a sub-$50,000 (after federal energy tax credits) sedan today live on streaming video. According to Left Lane News, who is carrying the streaming video, "No press material has been handed out in advance to any media outlets, and the teasers that have been released were carefully timed and controlled. If we didn't know better, we'd guess Steve Jobs was running the show at Tesla.""
Link to Original Source
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Lars Ulrich of Metallica pirates his own album

rudeboy1 rudeboy1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

rudeboy1 writes "Lars Ulrich, drummer for Metallica, and long time opponent of file sharing admitted to 'pirating' his own album, Death Magnetic last year. "I sat there myself and downloaded 'Death Magnetic' from the Internet just to try it," he said. "I was like, 'Wow, this is how it works.' I figured if there is anybody that has a right to download 'Death Magnetic' for free, it's me." Is it too much to hope for that the RIAA catches wind of this and serves him with a lawsuit?"
Link to Original Source
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Joss Whedon Shuns Hollywood With Indie Web Series

rudeboy1 rudeboy1 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

rudeboy1 writes "Joss Whedon, creator of geek TV staples such as Firefly and Buffy The Vampire Slayer, has come out with a new, internet only, superhero epic called Dr. Horrible's Sing Along Blog. The series stars Neil Patrick Harris as Dr. Horrible, and Firefly's Nathan Fillion as his arch enemy, Captain Hammer. As if the cast and director combination wasn't good enough, there's an extra twist: The series is a musical! Each episode contains multiple numbers, sung (pretty well) by the lead characters. In a letter written by Whedon on the site, Joss explains that the development came during the WGA writer strike which concluded earlier this year. It is a direct attempt to show what can be done outside the normal Hollywood system, "To show how much could be done with very little." Each of the three episodes is set to go live this week, the first is already live, while acts 2 and 3 go up later this week. The series will be available for free on the site until July 20th, at which point it will be available for download and later released to DVD."
Link to Original Source
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rudeboy1 rudeboy1 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

rudeboy1 (516023) writes "So, after ambling through the aisles of the usual super-bookstores that populate my town, I have come to the conclusion that, given my relative knowledge and passion for the subject, I will begin writing a book very soon on the matters of tech politics, in an effort to bring them into the mainstream.
    The apathy of this country on such matters is rather well known, and doubly so when the subject matter cannot be explained an 8 year old child. So, with years of experience in such things, as most people here do, and with the penchant for rants and rave, I will embark on this project ASAP. I've never written anything this long, and that scares me a bit. My strategy is to have a detailed outline that I will simply "fill in the blanks", in do doing, should be able to pump out a 2-300 page book in about 6 months time. My main adversary on this project is the fact that I'm writing about current affairs, which may be completely different in 6 months. That is a bitch, and I'd love to know how other authors manage to churn out thick, heavy books on hot topics seemingly as soon as they become hot. My only hope is to judiciously choose my topics for ones that have a longer life span.
    Due to the fact I am airing this information in a public forum, I shall keep the topics under consideration private, as I can read and therefore am subjected every other day to people who were foolish enough to share their ideas with the wrong people, and were beaten to the market in bringing those ideas to fruition.
    I know that, despite what I think I know about the subject, I have a mountain of research to do on the subject, and will need to conduct several interviews. If anyone passing by this journal entry happens to be an authority on the subject of any of the following, please contact me, and I will be glad to set up an interview, and give proper credit in said book. What slashdot blowhard could resist being quoted as an expert in a honest-to-god, DTW book? Email me, should you decide you are up to the challenge. A note of warning to all unqualified wackjobs; I will be checking references, so if you are a guy with an opinion, I don't need you. If you are a lawyer with an opinion, I want to talk to you urgently! The above subjects needed are as follows:
--Law, general and/or specific to politics, entertainment, environmental, copyright, privacy, and litigation
--Technical, in the areas of the internet-the nuts and bolts of its governence and operation, rootkits, open source, source code in general, and technical surveillance techniques.
    There may be more, but that is a compiled list based on what I'm working on right now. If you feel you are an expert on a subject related to a hot technical issue, give me buzz, and I will see where you fit in with my overall concept.
Good Night!"

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