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Comments

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Will Windows 10 Finally Address OS Decay?

rudy_wayne Re: Here's the solution (482 comments)

Not really. It's just bad design.

Your server isn't getting games installed on it, which put all kinds of settings in the registry, then removed later when the game is old and tired, leaving behind cruft (including DRM bullsit) in the registry.

When a program is UNinstalled, all traces of it should be gone. Apple took a different approach, which arguably works far better. Even if stuff is left behind, it just takes up a bit of disk space, and doesn't affect the system at all.

Yes it is bad design. It is bad design by the people who create applications. The level of incompetence is staggering and this includes all the big name vendors.

Funny you should mention Apple. The Windows version of iTunes (the shittiest piece of software ever written) installs support files for 34 different languages. There is no option to only select the language you want at install time and the user is completely unaware that iTunes has just dropped approximately 4,400 un-needed files onto his hard drive.

But wait! It gets better! iTunes also creates a registry entry FOR EVERY SINGLE FUCKING FILE!! I am not making this up. ~4,400 files AND registry entries that can be deleted with absolutely no effect on the functioning of iTunes.

yesterday
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Microsoft's Asimov System To Monitor Users' Machines In Real Time

rudy_wayne Re:Start menu usage dropped in lieu of what? (266 comments)

Prior to Windows 8, what exactly where people using to start applications if they were not using the start menu?
Or did they just notice the start menu was being used less often because people were keeping applications open?

90% of the people I see using windows have the desktop covered with icons to launch everything.

This is probably true, but it also illustrates the problem with Microsoft removing the Start Menu.

Removing the Start Menu provides zero benefit to the people who don't use it (they don't use it so they don't care if it's gone and removing it has no effect on how they do things) and makes things more difficult for the people who do use it.

2 days ago
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Netropolitan Is a Facebook For the Affluent, and It's Only $9000 To Join

rudy_wayne Re:.info (178 comments)

According to their website:

"The entire service is inaccessible from the public Internet, including search engines. "

about two weeks ago
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Say Goodbye To That Unwanted U2 Album

rudy_wayne Re:Not good enough (323 comments)

a) false. You had to have your device set to allow automatic pushes.
2) Hardly new.
III) That's irrelevant to what happened. You putting this here tells me the only reason you are upset is because it's a group you don't like.
I know, I now, it's quite fashionable to hate a guy who spends a shit load of money helping people.

Please listen .... what's that sound?

WHOOSH!!

about two weeks ago
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Say Goodbye To That Unwanted U2 Album

rudy_wayne Re:Not good enough (323 comments)

The most troubling aspects of this are:

(a) Apple can push material onto your device without your knowledge or consent

(2) It can be done in a way that is difficult to remove

(iii) Bono

about two weeks ago
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Google Serves Old Search Page To Old Browsers

rudy_wayne There are several problems with this (152 comments)

Google says: "We encourage everyone to make the free upgrade to modern browsers -- they’re more secure and provide a better web experience overall."

Bullshit.

First, this simply is not true. Beginning with version 29 (which is now 3 or 4 versions out of date already), Firefox completely fucked up their browser and turned it into unusable garbage. Newer is not better. Newer is demonstrably worse. If I wanted a shitty browser with extremely limited configurability, I'd use Internet Explorer.

Second, you should be able to view any web page using any browser released in the last 5 years. If something doesn't work properly it means you are putting too much fucked up bullshit into your webpage.

about a month ago
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Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

rudy_wayne Re:What problem does this solve, again? (215 comments)

Driverless cars and drone deliveries are good examples of the old saying, "just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD."

about a month ago
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How the Internet of Things Could Aid Disaster Response

rudy_wayne Re:How the Internet of Things Could Aid Disaster (60 comments)

How the Internet of Things Could Aid Disaster
By not having updates (of kernel or any other software, kinda like android does today for many "old" phones) and/or being closed source, we will have TONS of compromised systems, each and every single IoT device will become a bot.
Just imagine the future: your entire network compromised from your fridge, the digital thermometer or who knows what else. The consequences of such a disaster are already known...

And there lies the real problem.

An "Internet of things" could be very useful in many situations. But the companies who produce these things are so criminally incompetent (and greedy) that they don't give two shits about security. They don't even give one shit about security. And so now we already have a few billion devices that are easily exploited. And it's only going to get worse.

about 2 months ago
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Sony Forgets To Pay For Domain, Hilarity Ensues

rudy_wayne Re:ring ring (277 comments)

you try ringing one of these corporations and see how far you get.

Exactly. Unless you know someone or have some inside connections, it is virtually impossible to contact someone, who actually knows something, using publicly available information. And I'm sure that NetworkSolutions really doesn't want to spend time calling everyone who lets their registration lapse.

The real problem is that Sony couldn't be arsed to register the domain names using a working e-mail address that actually goes to the person at Sony who is responsible for such a thing.

about 2 months ago
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Interviews: Ask Lawrence Lessig About His Mayday PAC

rudy_wayne Re:Irony (308 comments)

This would be taken seriously if Cantor hadn't just lost after outspending the other guy 5,000,000 to 200,000.

. The Eric Cantor case was an exception, not the rule. In most cases, the politician who greatly outspends his opponent usually wins

But the bigger issue that Lessig doesn't seem to understand is that he's not the only person trying to buy politicians. No matter how much money he raises, there are people out there spending a whole lot more money, a LOT more money, to buy politicians who oppose the political agenda supported by Lessig, the EFF and others.

about 3 months ago
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After 47 Years, Computerworld Ceases Print Publication

rudy_wayne Re:Did anyone care anymore? (105 comments)

I think I bought my last computer magazine in about 2000. The web killed the market for such things long ago.

Although the Internet has certainly put a big dent in all magazine sales, I've been noticing that most magazine publishers are their own worst enemy -- less content, lower quality content, more ads and higher prices.

about 3 months ago
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Washington Redskins Stripped of Trademarks

rudy_wayne Re:Chicago Blackhawks too? (646 comments)

Chief Wahoo is pretty insulting.

That's your opinion.

In my opinion there is nothing wrong with Chief Wahoo and the name Redskins. So what make you right and me wrong? And that's the problem here. There is no such thing as a wrong opinion. With all the problems we have in this society, it is absurd that THIS is what people are upset about.

about 3 months ago
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Comcast Converting 50,000 Houston Home Routers Into Public WiFi Hotspots

rudy_wayne Re:Liability (474 comments)

Yes, this is a shitty thing to do, but, Comcast is a shitty company, so no surprise there. But there is a simple answer. Turn it off. If you don't know how, do a little research and figure out how. If you can't be bothered to expend a little mental energy, then it must not be much of a problem.

about 4 months ago
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Was Turing Test Legitimately Beaten, Or Just Cleverly Tricked?

rudy_wayne Re:but that's the problem with the turing test... (309 comments)

It has nothing to do with actual artificial intelligence and everything to do with writing deceptive scripts. It's not just this incident, it's a problem with the goal of the Turing test itself. I always found the Turing test a kind of stupid exercise due to this.

Exactly right.

Was Turing Test Legitimately Beaten, Or Just Cleverly Tricked? I see no difference between the two. Beaten is beaten, no matter how it is accomplished.

If the Turing Test can be "cleverly tricked" then it simply demonstrates that the Turing Test is flawed and meaningless.

about 4 months ago
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Bill Watterson (briefly) Returns To Comics

rudy_wayne Re:If only Bill Waterson inspired other cartoonist (119 comments)

To stop cartooning. Beatle Baily, Hagar the Horrible, Garfield and yes... I'll even go far as Dilbert (I'm sure blasphemy to geeks around here) are worn out strips that are recycling the same dumb gags and phone-it-in art over and over. I actually respect Waterson for quitting in his prime.

Sadly I have to agree. All the strips that have been around for a while are on auto-pilot, coasting along on their fame. The creators are putting zero effort into them.

about 4 months ago
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Bill Watterson (briefly) Returns To Comics

rudy_wayne Re:I wonder where Watterson would go today (119 comments)

With online distribution, he could draw whatever he wanted without as many limits, and while limitations do breed creativity, they can also put you in a box.

But I suspect he's too bitter to try.

Or is he?

Calvin and Hobbes is still syndicated all over the world and according to sales figure I saw a couple of years ago, he is conservatively pulling in a couple hundred thousand dollars a year from the sales of Calvin and Hobbes books (there are 18 of them).

Not bad for a guy who hasn't worked since 1995.

about 4 months ago
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GM Names and Fires Engineers Involved In Faulty Ignition Switch

rudy_wayne Re:Get those little people! (307 comments)

It's always the little people that do the real damage! Not anybody at the top!

According to the article, 15 people were fired and this includes some "senior leaders and executives"

about 4 months ago
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Bill Blunden's Rejected DEF CON Presentation Posted Online

rudy_wayne Re:Actually RTFA (40 comments)

This is a conjecture talk, I can see why they rejected it. Bill, if you happen to read this comment, I think your talk was refused because it uses a lot of "could" and "might" to build a global picture of corruption, landed back in the banking system and corrupt government, failed to point out any non-obvious outcomes or opportunities, and didn't suggest any ways an attendee could constructively effect or participate in the problem. .

He starts off good and makes quite a few good points, nothing terribly new or exciting but valid points still. But then about 3/4 of the way through he goes off the rails and starts ranting about corrupt banks and ends up sounding like just another crackpot.

about 4 months ago
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Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Buys the LA Clippers For $2 Billion

rudy_wayne Re:What a punishment (270 comments)

Will he rename the teams to the Los Angeles Clippys?

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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Goldman Sachs demands Google unsend one of its e-mails

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 3 months ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "A Goldman Sachs contractor was testing internal changes made to Goldman Sachs' system and prepared a report with sensitive client information, including details on brokerage accounts. The report was accidentally e-mailed to a 'gmail.com' address rather than the correct 'gs.com' address. Google told Goldman Sachs on June 26 that it couldn't just reach into Gmail and delete the e-mail without a court order. Goldman Sachs filed with the New York Supreme Court, requesting "emergency relief" to avoid a privacy violation and "avoid the risk of unnecessary reputational damage to Goldman Sachs.""
Link to Original Source
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Create A Botnet By Abusing Free Cloud Services

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 7 months ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Last week at the RSA Conference, a pair of researchers demonstrated how it was possible to legally create a botnet for free by abusing trial accounts made available by high-powered platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) offerings.

The question they asked themselves was how hard would it be to automate the process of signing up for an unlimited number of free accounts from these sites and then developing a central control system from which an attacker could potentially launch malicious activities. The answer: not hard at all.

The project was made possible through the development of a process to automate the creation of unique email accounts on free email services, and then special scripting to automate the process of clicking on email verification links sent to those accounts."

Link to Original Source
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Prenda lawyer kicked off 9th Circuit case

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a year ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "On Friday, Paul Hansmeier, a Minnesota attorney who has been pointed to as one of the masterminds of the Prenda copyright-trolling scheme, filed an emergency motion to stay the $81,000 sanctions order while he and his colleagues could mount an appeal. Today the appeals court flatly denied his motion.. Two appellate judges signed this order, and it gives Hansmeier the option to make a plea for delay with the district court judge. That would be US District Judge Otis Wright, the judge who sanctioned Hansmeier in the first place.

Hansmeier is also getting kicked off a case he was working on that was totally unrelated to Prenda's scheme of making copyright accusations over alleged pornography downloads. On Friday, the 9th Circuit Commissioner ordered Hansmeier, in no uncertain terms, to withdraw a the case involving Groupon since he has been referred to the Minnesota State Bar for investigation. The commissioner has delayed Hansmeier's admission to the 9th Circuit because of Wright's order, which refers to Wright's finding of "moral turpitude.""
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Judge hints at jail time for porn troll Prenda Law

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a year and a half ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "A federal judge in Los Angeles has suggested serious penalties for Brett Gibbs, an attorney at porn copyright trolling firm Prenda Law. Facing allegations of fraud and identity theft, Gibbs will be required to explain himself at a March 11 hearing. And if Judge Otis Wright isn't satisfied with his answers, he may face fines and even jail time.

The identity theft allegations emerged late last year, when a Minnesota man named Alan Cooper told a Minnesota court he suspected Prenda Law named him as the CEO of two litigious offshore holding companies without his permission. Worried about exposing himself to potential liability for the firms' misconduct, Cooper asked the court to investigate the situation. Cooper's letter was spotted by Morgan Pietz, an attorney who represents "John Doe" defendants in California. He notified Judge Wright of the allegations."

Link to Original Source
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Millions Will Go to Privacy Groups Who Support Weak Facebook Settlement

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Privacy and consumer groups are urging a federal judge to sign off on a controversial settlement to a class-action lawsuit over Facebook's “Sponsored Stories” advertising program, despite indifference to or confusion over the terms of the vaguely written settlement. Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy in Washington, D.C., said the settlement amounts to “just putting some more words into Facebook’s privacy policy that nobody reads.”

However, the Electronic Freedom Foundation which would receive $1 Million under the settlement (almost one-fourth of their entire budget last year) supports the settlement "for budgetary reasons" and according to EFF legal director Cindy Cohn, “We haven’t taken a position on this settlement, whether it’s a good idea or not”."

Link to Original Source
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Wikipedia Didn't Kill Brittanica. Windows Did

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "The end of Encyclopedia Brittanica has been widely reported and its demise has been blamed on Wikipedia. However, this article at Wired points out that the real reason is something entirely different.

"In 1990 Brittanica had $650 million in revenue. In 1996, long before Wikipedia existed, it was bankrupt and the entire company was sold for $135 million. What happened in between was Encarta. Even though Encarta didn't make money for Microsoft and Brittanica produced its own encyclopedia CDs, Encarta was an inexpensive, multimedia encyclopedia that helped Microsoft sell Windows PCs to families. And once you had a PC in the living room or den where the encyclopedia used to be, it was all over for Mighty Brittanica. It’s not that Encarta made knowledge cheaper, it’s that technology supplanted its role as a purchasable ‘edge’ for over-anxious parents. They bought junior a new PC instead of a Britannica. When Wikipedia emerged five years later, Brittanica was already a weakened giant. It wasn’t a free and open encyclopedia that defeated its print edition. It was the personal computer itself.""

Link to Original Source
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How to "Brick" a car

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "According to an article at The Understatement:: A Tesla Roadster that is simply parked without being plugged in will eventually become a “brick”. The parasitic load from the car’s always-on subsystems continually drains the battery and if the battery’s charge is ever totally depleted, it is essentially destroyed. The only known remedy is for the owner to pay Tesla approximately $40,000 to replace the entire battery. Unlike practically every other modern car problem, neither Tesla’s warranty nor typical car insurance policies provide any protection from this major financial loss. Of the approximately 2,200 Roadsters sold to date, a regional service manager for Tesla says he is personally aware of at least five cases of Tesla Roadsters being “bricked” due to battery depletion."
Link to Original Source
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The Problem With Online Ads

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Clive Thompson has an article in Wired magazine about the problem with online advertising. For years, everyone has claimed that you can’t charge for anything online. If you dream up a cool new idea, your only way to make money is to generate as many impressions as possible for advertisers. This inevitably produces horrid, cynical designs that work against what people want — such as clogging pages with distracting banners or breaking them into smaller chunks so users have to click around a lot.

But a new generation of web entrepreneurs has discovered the joys of charging users cold, hard cash. Along with sites like Pinboard (similar to Del.icio.us), there’s the read-it-later service Instapaper, private social-network site Ning, and countless iPhone apps that require you to lay down coin. If we’re lucky, this trend will save the Internet from one of the most corrosive forces affecting it: advertising."

Link to Original Source
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News Corp. looking to sell MySpace

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes ""The Wall Street Journal is reporting that News. Corp is trying to sell MySpace for $100 Million, a fraction of the $580 Million that it originally paid in 2005. Parties reportedly interested in acquiring MySpace include private equity firm THL Partners, Redscout Ventures and Criterion Capital, owner of social network Bebo (the company AOL bought for $850 Million and then sold for $10 Million). Chinese Internet holding company Tencent is also reportedly interested and so is Myspace co-founder Chris De Wolfe. What’s not yet clear is what any of these companies plan to do with MySpace if a sale goes through.""
Link to Original Source
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News Corp. trying to sell MySpace

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "The Wall Street Journal has reported that News. Corp is trying to sell MySpace for $100 Million, a fraction of the $580 Million that it paid for MySpace in 2005. Parties reportedly interested in acquiring MySpace include private equity firm THL Partners, Redscout Ventures and Criterion Capital, owner of social network Bebo (the company AOL bought for $850 Million and then sold for $10 Million). Chinese Internet holding company Tencent is also reportedly interested as is Myspace co-founder Chris De Wolfe. What’s not yet clear is what any of these companies plan to do with MySpace if a sale goes through."
Link to Original Source
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Dish Network Buys Blockbuster

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Dish Network won a bankruptcy auction for Blockbuster with a bid of $320 million and on the surface the deal sounds a little bit crazy. What’s Dish going to do with 1,700 store locations and a brand that’s arguably broken? The real win here may be the Internet streaming rights that Dish will now own. Kaufman Bros. analyst Todd Mitchell wrote: "As part of an acquisition, DISH would presumably get Blockbuster’s Internet streaming rights, the Blockbuster brand and its customer lists. Combined with a build-out of the wireless spectrum it has acquired and technology from EchoStar and Hughes, we believe DISH could launch an on demand movie service that would 1) significantly enhance the competitive offering of the DISH Network, and 2) compete on a standalone basis with Netflix and other over-the-top video services." Dish’s set-top boxes already have an Ethernet port so adding streaming content wouldn’t be much of a stretch."
Link to Original Source
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Internet Explorer will survive and Firefox won't

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "There is an interesting (and probably controversial) piece on on Why Internet Explorer will survive and Firefox won't

"It’s tempting to look at Microsoft’s history with Internet Explorer and assume that they are just incapable of working at the speed of the Internet. But take a closer look at the development process for IE 9 and there’s a different story to tell. Microsoft is playing the same game as Google. Mozilla is stuck in 2005. And that’s why the core of Internet Explorer will still be around in five years when Firefox will have, at best, a loyal cult following."

"At last year’s MIX conference, Microsoft talked about its new app platform: write code once, target for multiple platforms. That’s the same space that Google is playing in. Google has an entire family of apps that are designed to work exclusively in a browser."

"So where does that leave Firefox? It doesn’t have an app ecosystem or a loyal core of developers. Extensions? Those were worth bragging about in 2005, but in 2012 the story is apps. Businesses and consumers will want to use the same browser that powers their installed apps. In the PC space, that means Google or Microsoft. It doesn’t leave room for a third player.""

Link to Original Source
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How to crash the Internet

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "We know you can take down Web sites with Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. We know that a country, like Egypt, can shut down a country’s entire Internet access. And, we thought we knew that you can't take down the entire Internet.

It turns out we could be wrong.

In a report from New Scientist, Max Schuchard a computer science graduate student and his buddies claim they've found a way to launch DDoS attacks on Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) network routers that could crash the Internet."
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Google, H.264 and WebM - the mud clears (sort of)

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "When it was announced that H.264 was being dropped from Google's Chrome browser I thought it was really weird since Google converted all of YouTube's videos to H.264 just 3 years ago. Now, Charles Arthur, writing for The Guardian says the decision to drop H.264 was made entirely by the Chrome team and did not come from Google's top management. A related article at ZDNet sums it up as "Google is not giving up H.264 on YouTube, H.264 will continue to be supported in Android, and it has nothing to do with YouTube storage issues, H.264 license pricing or Google's desire to be totally open source — it's about Chrome wanting to be disruptive."
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The strange disappearance of Dancho Danchev

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "ZDNet is reporting that Zero Day blogger and malware researcher Dancho Danchev has gone missing since August of last year. Dancho, who was relentless in his pursuit of cyber-criminals, last blogged here on August 18. His personal blog has not been updated since September 11, 2010.

At ZDNet, we made multiple attempts to contact him, to no avail. Telephone numbers are going to Bulgarian language voicemails and our attempts to reach him via a snail mail address also came up empty. Just recently, a trusted member of the malware research community reached out to us to say he had received a troubling letter from Dancho on September 9, 2010, about the threat of persecution in Bulgaria."
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Porn & recipes found on Toronto's dead drop

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes ""Whenever I think of people secretly exchanging information, I envision money bags left behind loose bricks and secret documents hidden in a hollowed out book. As it turns out, this method of sharing information has a name — it's called a "dead drop". In October 2010, Berlin-based media artist Aram Bartholl decided to modernize the idea and created five USB dead drops in New York City. The idea is simple: a USB flash drive is embedded into a wall or other public space using cement. After that, anyone can access the drive and leave and take files as they please."

According to Lauren Souch at blogTO, "In early November, a dead drop appeared in Toronto. The drop currently contains twelve recipes, a list of fictional drug use in movies (with hyperlinks!) and a guide on how to make a homemade stun glove using a disposable camera. Of course, there are also a number of pictures loaded on the USB — 45 to be exact — and I was not surprised to find roughly 40% of the pictures are either half-naked women or porn.""
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Prototype of first portable Mac listed on Ebay

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "This Ebay listing claims to be for a prototype of the first portable Mac, circa 1990. The listing describes the unit as "absolutely mint, flawless, clean" which apparently only applies to the outside of the computer, since inside it contains a dead Lead-Acid battery."
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Is the source of open source the root of all evil?

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Dana Blankenhorn at ZDNet says "Most open source software does not come from open source companies, or the open source community. It comes from proprietary companies. It comes from folks wanting to sell stuff by connecting their wares to the power open source provides." To back up this claim, he points to an article written by Matt Assay, COO of Canonical:

Google contributes more open-source software than Red Hat, for example, most recently open sourcing an Apache server module for improving website performance. And as the software world moves to the web, Facebook, Yahoo!, Twitter, and even Microsoft (gasp!) will outpace their open-source peers in terms of open-source software contributions. The less software is responsible for directly driving sales, the more it will find itself under an open-source license, written by companies who would never describe themselves as open-source software companies, or software companies at all.

"
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Open letter to Steve Jobs: Retire Now

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "David Gewirtz at ZDNet writes:

Friday’s event was deeply disturbing. There you were, up there on stage, mocking genuinely valid concerns over the fundamental performance of your flagship product, arrogantly denying credible analysis by some of the most reputable product testers on the planet, telling members of the press that you love your users so much that you've built 300 Apple retail stores just for them. The whole thing was embarrassing. It was beneath you.

Bill Gates has become one of the world's leading philanthropists, probably the most generous and effective in the history of the mankind. By comparison, you're spending your days (and, apparently, your nights) arguing with consumers who bought a $200 phone and complaining that Consumer Reports doesn't know how to test consumer products. Almost 30 years ago, John Scully was at Pepsi and you asked him, oeDo you want to sell sugar water for the rest of your life, or do you want to come with me and change the world?

So, Steve, here's the question I ask you: oeDo you want to sell crappy phones and consumer electronics for the rest of your life, or do you want to leave Apple and change the world?"
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iPhone Class Action lawsuit will go forward

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "ZDNet reports that a federal judge in California decided that several civil lawsuits filed against Apple and AT&T since 2007 — which address a number of antitrust concerns — could now be consolidated into a single class action in federal court and could proceed accordingly.

The main thrust of the lass action will be about carrier/device lock-in — The plaintiffs contend that even though they entered a two-year agreement when they bought their iPhones, they were really forced into a five year agreement for voice and data services on their devices without their consent, and after two years, they could not unlock their phones and take them to another compatible carrier, such as T-Mobile. They also contend that the iPhone became unusable if a customer had unlocked it for use on another service provider (such as T-Mobile)."

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