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Backblaze's 6 TB Hard Drive Face-Off

rudy_wayne Re:Man, am I old ... (172 comments)

It's harder for me to listen to users justify their "need" for several hundred gigabytes or even terabytes of storage for their personal archives.

Call somebody a pat rat hoarder in real life and they'll likely become horribly offended. Accuse them of the same thing in virtual space, and they wear it like a badge of honor.

I wonder if the average consumer realizes that when they die, no one will give a shit about going through terabytes of crap.

Hoarding physical objects takes up increasing amounts of physical space. Instead of a basement filled with a hundred boxes, I have 8 TB of archived data that takes up about the same amount of physical space as a single hard cover book.

And I couldn't care less what anyone else thinks of my terabytes of stuff. it's for me, not them. And when I die I'm sure they'll just throw it out and free up those few precious square inches of 'wasted' space.

3 days ago
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Dr. Dobb's 38-Year Run Comes To an End

rudy_wayne Re:Pretty sad (155 comments)

I was a subscriber back in the day. Sad to see it going, but it's not too surprising, given modern trends.

Ah yes. the modern trend of selling out.

From TFA:
"Our parent company, United Business Media (UBM), has decided to sunset Dr. Dobb's."

Like so many others, the founders were happy to collect a big pay day and walk away, leaving it in the hands of some other company who only cares about maximizing profits at the expense of all else. And when the profits can't be maximized to their liking they are happy to shut it down. Oh well, Dr. Dobbs lasted a lot longer than most, so I guess there's that.

4 days ago
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Spanish Media Group Wants Gov't Help To Keep Google News In Spain

rudy_wayne Re:Imagine that! (191 comments)

Google needs to play this card more often.

Yes, I'm glad to see someone is finally growing a pair and standing up to this nonsense.

Funny how, just like in Germany, the newspaper publishers scream that Google is killing them, but when Google leaves they complain that Google's leaving is killing them.

about a week ago
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BGP Hijacking Continues, Despite the Ability To Prevent It

rudy_wayne Required -- Except When It Isn't (57 comments)

ARIN requires operators accept something called the Relying Party Agreement.

But the provider community . . . is choosing not to implement it

So ARIN apparently has no ability to enforce the 'requirement', making the 'requirement' meaningless.

about a week ago
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Apple DRM Lawsuit Loses Last Plaintiff, but Judge Rules Against Dismissal

rudy_wayne What? (71 comments)

"At the heart of the case is that Apple's use of DRM harmed customers by raising the price of the iPod"

A couple of years ago I received an iPod Classic as a gift. At the time, the price was $259, which I consider to be ridiculous. Does this meant they were even more expensive previously?

about two weeks ago
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Unity 8 Will Bring 'Pure' Linux Experience To Mobile Devices

rudy_wayne Re:Ugh (125 comments)

No one wants this but you so please give up.

Seriously, what don't you get... Unity was released in 2010. Here's a graph showing distro use:
http://royal.pingdom.com/wp-co...

See how your distro use tanked in 2010? And Mint Spiked? Your users have spoken... listen!

According to that chart, Ubuntu has been steadily declining since 2005 and didn't "tank" in 2010 any worse than it did in any other year.

about two weeks ago
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Apple DRM Lawsuit Might Be Dismissed: Plaintiffs Didn't Own Affected iPods

rudy_wayne Re: Not unexpected. (141 comments)

Because you assume something easy like iTunes might have some sliver of intuitive design, but nope.. Took me a hour to try and get a CD onto my iPhone.

if you are trying to put a CD on your Phone, you're doing it wrong.

about two weeks ago
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The Sony Pictures Hack Was Even Worse Than Everyone Thought

rudy_wayne Re:... Everything? (528 comments)

Certainly legal. There's nobody who can't hold your medial information. .

Wrong.

HIPAA regulations are pretty strict about this. The company I work for does everything through a 3rd party because of this.

  When I told my boss I had to have time off for surgery I was given the phone number for the 3rd party company and they handled everything. They contacted my doctor and obtained all the necessary medical information to verify that I was off work for a legitimate medical reason. When I was ready to return to work, I went to a doctor who examined me and then reported to the 3rd party company that I was OK. The third party company then notified my employer that I was OK to return to work. At no time was my employer ever given any medical information about me.

about two weeks ago
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Hawking Warns Strong AI Could Threaten Humanity

rudy_wayne Re:So What (574 comments)

Another doomsday rubbish article.

We have yet to produce anything that even remotely resembles 'intelligence' by any stretch of the imagination. So far we have only managed to create artifical stupidity. We are in no danger of producing Skynet and automated factories churning out armies of Terminators. Hell, 99% of the businesses in the world can't secure their networks from script kiddies or write software that doesn't have more holes than a metric ton of swiss cheese. Those are the real problems that will harm us, long before we even get close to creating 'artificial intelligence'.

about three weeks ago
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A Mismatch Between Wikimedia's Pledge Drive and Its Cash On Hand?

rudy_wayne Re:Not sure there's a problem... (274 comments)

So from this information alone, I'm not sure I see the problem.

    You have a very large website that I'm sure gets unimaginable amounts of traffic, operating for free and supported by voluntary donations, and their budget is increasing because they've hired engineers to keep the thing running. That all sounds reasonable enough.

So what's the complaint here? Do you think someone is embezzling money, or that they're just stockpiling money for no reason? Do you think that they're spending money in the wrong places, and if so, where you do think they're spending money, and where do you think they should be spending money? I think you need to give me something before I can figure out how to be outraged at all of this.

That's because this is Slashdot and you haven't bothered to actually read TFA.

Improving Wikipedia’s content is not really in the budget. Nearly $20 million goes toward salaries and wages, despite the fact that none of the staff edit Wikipedia as part of their job function. Almost $6 million was spent last year on awards and grants which certainly help produce some content for Wikipedia,but the writers are not typically compensated with anything more than pizza, sandwiches, and soft drinks.

Less than 6% of the WMF budget is spent on Internet hosting even though most people probably believe it’s their biggest expense. Meanwhile, they spend almost as much money (about $2 million) on travel and conferences. There is also a huge bucket for “other operating expenses” totaling nearly $12.5 million — some of which certainly pays for expensive downtown office space in San Francisco.

The WMF staff busy themselves on things that rarely have anything to do with writing, organizing, or exercising editorial discretion over the actual written product of Wikipedia. Instead, the WMF now considers itself a software and technology organization, but ends up doing more harm than good with its software "innovations". The last two software roll-outs — Visual Editor and Media Viewer — were loathed by a wide swath of users. The WMF responded to the community’s rejection of its software by literally forcing it back on the community with a tool called “superprotect”.

It appears that the Wikimedia Foundation has nearly run out of legitimate ways to spend the donors’ money, because much of it ends up in the organization’s savings accounts and bonds, or pays for software programmers who don't really seem to be doing anything worthwhile.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

rudy_wayne Re:One real reason (488 comments)

Most open source projects are
999 header files
355 directories
2345 code files
3 intermixed build systems
A python script or so just because

AND (&&)

There will be not a single line of documentation on how the source tree is laid out, and where to start understanding the project.

2). The response when asking where do I begin. RTFSC ? I'd rather pay for the software than be involved with that crap.

You' re being too kind.

Most are worse than that.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

rudy_wayne Re:Look what those assholes did to gedit. (488 comments)

You're absolutely right. Hipsters are killing open source projects left and right with their fucking awful UI changes.

Just look at what happened to gedit. It's a text editor that comes with GNOME.

It's absolutely fucking moronic what they've done to gedit. They've managed to completely destroy the UI of a text editor, for crying out loud!

Why the fuck would I want to contribute anything but a total and complete reversion back to the old UI? Getting rid of this shit-for-brains UI is the best possible bugfix that gedit could undergo right now. But will it be accepted? Of course not! The hipsters can't possibly be wrong about the UI.

Substitute 'Firefox' or just about any other open source program in place of 'Gedit' and you have a perfect description of what is wrong with open source today.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

rudy_wayne Re:Cult (488 comments)

But, how is that specific to open source?

Because closed source almost never has a publicly viewable bug tracker. At best, there's a forum where you can post bugs that most likely will be ignored and rarely acknowledged even if accepted and fixed..

Because closed source never has people from outside the company submitting patches By definition, people other than the developers can't see the source (hence 'closed'). For example. the vast majority of people who work at Microsoft are not allowed to see the Windows source code.

Because closed source rarely solicits or accepts work of any kind from people outside the company, except under NDA.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Non-Coders, Why Aren't You Contributing To Open Source?

rudy_wayne Re:Cult (488 comments)

This. Open Source people tend to be fundamentalist in nature, which doesn't exactly make it easy to contribute. Compromise, agreement, pragmatism - these are all foreign concepts to them.

Exactly. I have tried almost all of the methods of contributing listed in the article and have either been ignored or rejected.

about three weeks ago
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Scientists Have Finally Sampled the Most Abundant Material On Earth

rudy_wayne Re:Wait till they see water! (128 comments)

I thought stupidity was the most abundant material on earth.

about three weeks ago
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Firefox 34 Arrives With Video Chat, Yahoo Search As Default

rudy_wayne Re:Yahoo Search? (237 comments)

I was really hoping that when Mozilla's contract with Google ran out the whole bloated business would collapse and they would go back to just making a browser that people actually want to use. But a new money truck just arrived in town and they can continue to add more and more useless 'features' while destroying all the things that made Firefox popular in the first place.

about three weeks ago
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The Cashless Society? It's Already Coming

rudy_wayne Re:You can pry my wallet from my... (375 comments)

(Where did you think that "free" money was coming from? Did you think merchants just eat that cost?)

How are online merchants offering free shipping without charging higher prices? UPS and FedEx don't deliver packages for free. The merchant eats the cost to get more business. Same with credit cards.

.(You didn't actually think your CC company was losing money on you, did you? Really!?)

.They lose money on me but make it back 1000 times over on all the dumbasses who charge more than they can afford to pay back.

about three weeks ago
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The Cashless Society? It's Already Coming

rudy_wayne Re:You can pry my wallet from my... (375 comments)

I'm sure the credit card company hates people like me, but fuck'em.

When they can charge merchants a 3% fee because you won't consider using cash, you can be sure your CC company fuckin' loves you.

(Where did you think that "free" money was coming from? Did you think merchants just eat that cost?)

(You didn't actually think your CC company was losing money on you, did you? Really!?)

Hey, guess what, I pay exactly the same price whether I use cash or credit card. The number of businesses that do not accept credit cards is extremely small and getting smaller every day. Yes, merchants *DO* eat the 3% CC fee. They have to. They have no choice thanks to good old fashioned competition. If you don't take credit cards you WILL lose business to competitors who do.

Back some time ago a bunch of merchants won a lawsuit challenging Visa/Mastercard rules, and as a result merchants are now allowed to charge people more for using a credit card instead of paying cash.. Well guess what, I have yet to encounter one single merchant doing that. They have no choice. Once again, good old fashioned competition. If they charge more for using a credit card, they will lose business to competitors who don't.

about three weeks ago
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The Cashless Society? It's Already Coming

rudy_wayne Re:You can pry my wallet from my... (375 comments)

The credit card company loves people like you who evangelize the idea of using your credit card for everything and then paying it off immediately and then earning cashback on it.

Why? Because most of the people you reach with your message will fail to do so correctly, and ultimately will owe the credit card company fees. The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

It's just too tempting for most people to say, "Well, this ONE month, I'll pay it late and then get that JetSki I've had my eyes on."

There is no "message" and I rarely mention this to anyone. Because I know that most people are too stupid to do it properly.

about three weeks ago
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The Cashless Society? It's Already Coming

rudy_wayne Re:You can pry my wallet from my... (375 comments)

I've been 98% cashless since the early 90s and never have more than a few dollars on me at any given time.. I put everything on a credit card and write one check a month to pay for everything. And now I don't even have to write a check, I just go online and make a payment straight out of my bank account to the credit card company. And, because I pay everything off every month it costs me nothing, and, since I'm using a 'cash back' credit card, I get a check for $50 every few months. It's not much but it's free money that I didn't have before. I'm sure the credit card company hates people like me, but fuck'em.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Users can't tell Facebook from a scam

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a month and a half ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Zdnet reports that a new whitepaper from antivirus company Bitdefender, which examined 850,000 Facebook scams over two years, shows that Facebook's own user experience enables these scams to flourish. The researchers found that scammers have infected millions of users with the same tricks over and over again — just repackaged.

The most common tricks, such as 'Guess who viewed your profile (45.5 percent)' and 'change your background color' (29.53 percent) rely on a combination of the obsessions encouraged by the Facebook experience, and a general lack of understanding about Facebook’s functionality — which, as most users know, is a constantly moving target. Users would be none the wiser that a given scam isn't just a new "feature" or another of Facebook's psychological experiments being done on users."
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Space Tourism Isn't Worth Dying For

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a month and a half ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Following the crash of Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo, an opinion piece at Wired calls the project nothing more than a "millionaire boondoggle thrill ride".

In the wake of this tragedy out at Mojave we’re going to hear a lot about exploration, about pioneers and frontiers. People are going to talk about Giant Leaps for Mankind and Boldly Going Where No One Has Gone Before. And we should call bullshit on that.

SpaceShipTwo is not a Federation starship. It’s not a vehicle for the exploration of frontiers. Virgin Galactic is building the world’s most expensive roller coaster, the aerospace version of Beluga caviar. It’s a thing for rich people to do.

Testing new aircraft takes a level of courage and ability beyond most humans. Those engineers and pilots are at the peak of human achievement. What they’re doing is amazing. Why Virgin is doing it is not.

When various corporate representatives eulogize those two pilots as pioneers who were helping to cross the Final Frontier, that should make you angry. That pilot died not for space but for a luxury service provider. His death doesn’t get us closer to Mars; it just keeps rich people further away from weightlessness and a beautiful view.

"
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Goldman Sachs demands Google unsend one of its e-mails

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 6 months ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "A Goldman Sachs contractor was testing internal changes made to Goldman Sachs' system and prepared a report with sensitive client information, including details on brokerage accounts. The report was accidentally e-mailed to a 'gmail.com' address rather than the correct 'gs.com' address. Google told Goldman Sachs on June 26 that it couldn't just reach into Gmail and delete the e-mail without a court order. Goldman Sachs filed with the New York Supreme Court, requesting "emergency relief" to avoid a privacy violation and "avoid the risk of unnecessary reputational damage to Goldman Sachs.""
Link to Original Source
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Create A Botnet By Abusing Free Cloud Services

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 9 months ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Last week at the RSA Conference, a pair of researchers demonstrated how it was possible to legally create a botnet for free by abusing trial accounts made available by high-powered platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) offerings.

The question they asked themselves was how hard would it be to automate the process of signing up for an unlimited number of free accounts from these sites and then developing a central control system from which an attacker could potentially launch malicious activities. The answer: not hard at all.

The project was made possible through the development of a process to automate the creation of unique email accounts on free email services, and then special scripting to automate the process of clicking on email verification links sent to those accounts."

Link to Original Source
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Prenda lawyer kicked off 9th Circuit case

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a year and a half ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "On Friday, Paul Hansmeier, a Minnesota attorney who has been pointed to as one of the masterminds of the Prenda copyright-trolling scheme, filed an emergency motion to stay the $81,000 sanctions order while he and his colleagues could mount an appeal. Today the appeals court flatly denied his motion.. Two appellate judges signed this order, and it gives Hansmeier the option to make a plea for delay with the district court judge. That would be US District Judge Otis Wright, the judge who sanctioned Hansmeier in the first place.

Hansmeier is also getting kicked off a case he was working on that was totally unrelated to Prenda's scheme of making copyright accusations over alleged pornography downloads. On Friday, the 9th Circuit Commissioner ordered Hansmeier, in no uncertain terms, to withdraw a the case involving Groupon since he has been referred to the Minnesota State Bar for investigation. The commissioner has delayed Hansmeier's admission to the 9th Circuit because of Wright's order, which refers to Wright's finding of "moral turpitude.""
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Judge hints at jail time for porn troll Prenda Law

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "A federal judge in Los Angeles has suggested serious penalties for Brett Gibbs, an attorney at porn copyright trolling firm Prenda Law. Facing allegations of fraud and identity theft, Gibbs will be required to explain himself at a March 11 hearing. And if Judge Otis Wright isn't satisfied with his answers, he may face fines and even jail time.

The identity theft allegations emerged late last year, when a Minnesota man named Alan Cooper told a Minnesota court he suspected Prenda Law named him as the CEO of two litigious offshore holding companies without his permission. Worried about exposing himself to potential liability for the firms' misconduct, Cooper asked the court to investigate the situation. Cooper's letter was spotted by Morgan Pietz, an attorney who represents "John Doe" defendants in California. He notified Judge Wright of the allegations."

Link to Original Source
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Millions Will Go to Privacy Groups Who Support Weak Facebook Settlement

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Privacy and consumer groups are urging a federal judge to sign off on a controversial settlement to a class-action lawsuit over Facebook's “Sponsored Stories” advertising program, despite indifference to or confusion over the terms of the vaguely written settlement. Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy in Washington, D.C., said the settlement amounts to “just putting some more words into Facebook’s privacy policy that nobody reads.”

However, the Electronic Freedom Foundation which would receive $1 Million under the settlement (almost one-fourth of their entire budget last year) supports the settlement "for budgetary reasons" and according to EFF legal director Cindy Cohn, “We haven’t taken a position on this settlement, whether it’s a good idea or not”."

Link to Original Source
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Wikipedia Didn't Kill Brittanica. Windows Did

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "The end of Encyclopedia Brittanica has been widely reported and its demise has been blamed on Wikipedia. However, this article at Wired points out that the real reason is something entirely different.

"In 1990 Brittanica had $650 million in revenue. In 1996, long before Wikipedia existed, it was bankrupt and the entire company was sold for $135 million. What happened in between was Encarta. Even though Encarta didn't make money for Microsoft and Brittanica produced its own encyclopedia CDs, Encarta was an inexpensive, multimedia encyclopedia that helped Microsoft sell Windows PCs to families. And once you had a PC in the living room or den where the encyclopedia used to be, it was all over for Mighty Brittanica. It’s not that Encarta made knowledge cheaper, it’s that technology supplanted its role as a purchasable ‘edge’ for over-anxious parents. They bought junior a new PC instead of a Britannica. When Wikipedia emerged five years later, Brittanica was already a weakened giant. It wasn’t a free and open encyclopedia that defeated its print edition. It was the personal computer itself.""

Link to Original Source
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How to "Brick" a car

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "According to an article at The Understatement:: A Tesla Roadster that is simply parked without being plugged in will eventually become a “brick”. The parasitic load from the car’s always-on subsystems continually drains the battery and if the battery’s charge is ever totally depleted, it is essentially destroyed. The only known remedy is for the owner to pay Tesla approximately $40,000 to replace the entire battery. Unlike practically every other modern car problem, neither Tesla’s warranty nor typical car insurance policies provide any protection from this major financial loss. Of the approximately 2,200 Roadsters sold to date, a regional service manager for Tesla says he is personally aware of at least five cases of Tesla Roadsters being “bricked” due to battery depletion."
Link to Original Source
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The Problem With Online Ads

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Clive Thompson has an article in Wired magazine about the problem with online advertising. For years, everyone has claimed that you can’t charge for anything online. If you dream up a cool new idea, your only way to make money is to generate as many impressions as possible for advertisers. This inevitably produces horrid, cynical designs that work against what people want — such as clogging pages with distracting banners or breaking them into smaller chunks so users have to click around a lot.

But a new generation of web entrepreneurs has discovered the joys of charging users cold, hard cash. Along with sites like Pinboard (similar to Del.icio.us), there’s the read-it-later service Instapaper, private social-network site Ning, and countless iPhone apps that require you to lay down coin. If we’re lucky, this trend will save the Internet from one of the most corrosive forces affecting it: advertising."

Link to Original Source
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News Corp. looking to sell MySpace

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes ""The Wall Street Journal is reporting that News. Corp is trying to sell MySpace for $100 Million, a fraction of the $580 Million that it originally paid in 2005. Parties reportedly interested in acquiring MySpace include private equity firm THL Partners, Redscout Ventures and Criterion Capital, owner of social network Bebo (the company AOL bought for $850 Million and then sold for $10 Million). Chinese Internet holding company Tencent is also reportedly interested and so is Myspace co-founder Chris De Wolfe. What’s not yet clear is what any of these companies plan to do with MySpace if a sale goes through.""
Link to Original Source
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News Corp. trying to sell MySpace

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "The Wall Street Journal has reported that News. Corp is trying to sell MySpace for $100 Million, a fraction of the $580 Million that it paid for MySpace in 2005. Parties reportedly interested in acquiring MySpace include private equity firm THL Partners, Redscout Ventures and Criterion Capital, owner of social network Bebo (the company AOL bought for $850 Million and then sold for $10 Million). Chinese Internet holding company Tencent is also reportedly interested as is Myspace co-founder Chris De Wolfe. What’s not yet clear is what any of these companies plan to do with MySpace if a sale goes through."
Link to Original Source
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Dish Network Buys Blockbuster

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Dish Network won a bankruptcy auction for Blockbuster with a bid of $320 million and on the surface the deal sounds a little bit crazy. What’s Dish going to do with 1,700 store locations and a brand that’s arguably broken? The real win here may be the Internet streaming rights that Dish will now own. Kaufman Bros. analyst Todd Mitchell wrote: "As part of an acquisition, DISH would presumably get Blockbuster’s Internet streaming rights, the Blockbuster brand and its customer lists. Combined with a build-out of the wireless spectrum it has acquired and technology from EchoStar and Hughes, we believe DISH could launch an on demand movie service that would 1) significantly enhance the competitive offering of the DISH Network, and 2) compete on a standalone basis with Netflix and other over-the-top video services." Dish’s set-top boxes already have an Ethernet port so adding streaming content wouldn’t be much of a stretch."
Link to Original Source
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Internet Explorer will survive and Firefox won't

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "There is an interesting (and probably controversial) piece on on Why Internet Explorer will survive and Firefox won't

"It’s tempting to look at Microsoft’s history with Internet Explorer and assume that they are just incapable of working at the speed of the Internet. But take a closer look at the development process for IE 9 and there’s a different story to tell. Microsoft is playing the same game as Google. Mozilla is stuck in 2005. And that’s why the core of Internet Explorer will still be around in five years when Firefox will have, at best, a loyal cult following."

"At last year’s MIX conference, Microsoft talked about its new app platform: write code once, target for multiple platforms. That’s the same space that Google is playing in. Google has an entire family of apps that are designed to work exclusively in a browser."

"So where does that leave Firefox? It doesn’t have an app ecosystem or a loyal core of developers. Extensions? Those were worth bragging about in 2005, but in 2012 the story is apps. Businesses and consumers will want to use the same browser that powers their installed apps. In the PC space, that means Google or Microsoft. It doesn’t leave room for a third player.""

Link to Original Source
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How to crash the Internet

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "We know you can take down Web sites with Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. We know that a country, like Egypt, can shut down a country’s entire Internet access. And, we thought we knew that you can't take down the entire Internet.

It turns out we could be wrong.

In a report from New Scientist, Max Schuchard a computer science graduate student and his buddies claim they've found a way to launch DDoS attacks on Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) network routers that could crash the Internet."
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Google, H.264 and WebM - the mud clears (sort of)

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "When it was announced that H.264 was being dropped from Google's Chrome browser I thought it was really weird since Google converted all of YouTube's videos to H.264 just 3 years ago. Now, Charles Arthur, writing for The Guardian says the decision to drop H.264 was made entirely by the Chrome team and did not come from Google's top management. A related article at ZDNet sums it up as "Google is not giving up H.264 on YouTube, H.264 will continue to be supported in Android, and it has nothing to do with YouTube storage issues, H.264 license pricing or Google's desire to be totally open source — it's about Chrome wanting to be disruptive."
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The strange disappearance of Dancho Danchev

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "ZDNet is reporting that Zero Day blogger and malware researcher Dancho Danchev has gone missing since August of last year. Dancho, who was relentless in his pursuit of cyber-criminals, last blogged here on August 18. His personal blog has not been updated since September 11, 2010.

At ZDNet, we made multiple attempts to contact him, to no avail. Telephone numbers are going to Bulgarian language voicemails and our attempts to reach him via a snail mail address also came up empty. Just recently, a trusted member of the malware research community reached out to us to say he had received a troubling letter from Dancho on September 9, 2010, about the threat of persecution in Bulgaria."
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Porn & recipes found on Toronto's dead drop

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes ""Whenever I think of people secretly exchanging information, I envision money bags left behind loose bricks and secret documents hidden in a hollowed out book. As it turns out, this method of sharing information has a name — it's called a "dead drop". In October 2010, Berlin-based media artist Aram Bartholl decided to modernize the idea and created five USB dead drops in New York City. The idea is simple: a USB flash drive is embedded into a wall or other public space using cement. After that, anyone can access the drive and leave and take files as they please."

According to Lauren Souch at blogTO, "In early November, a dead drop appeared in Toronto. The drop currently contains twelve recipes, a list of fictional drug use in movies (with hyperlinks!) and a guide on how to make a homemade stun glove using a disposable camera. Of course, there are also a number of pictures loaded on the USB — 45 to be exact — and I was not surprised to find roughly 40% of the pictures are either half-naked women or porn.""
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Prototype of first portable Mac listed on Ebay

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "This Ebay listing claims to be for a prototype of the first portable Mac, circa 1990. The listing describes the unit as "absolutely mint, flawless, clean" which apparently only applies to the outside of the computer, since inside it contains a dead Lead-Acid battery."
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Is the source of open source the root of all evil?

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Dana Blankenhorn at ZDNet says "Most open source software does not come from open source companies, or the open source community. It comes from proprietary companies. It comes from folks wanting to sell stuff by connecting their wares to the power open source provides." To back up this claim, he points to an article written by Matt Assay, COO of Canonical:

Google contributes more open-source software than Red Hat, for example, most recently open sourcing an Apache server module for improving website performance. And as the software world moves to the web, Facebook, Yahoo!, Twitter, and even Microsoft (gasp!) will outpace their open-source peers in terms of open-source software contributions. The less software is responsible for directly driving sales, the more it will find itself under an open-source license, written by companies who would never describe themselves as open-source software companies, or software companies at all.

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