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Comments

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Stephen Colbert To Be Letterman's Successor

rudy_wayne Re:So no change then (193 comments)

Colbert is funny, so that makes him a comedian.

But is letterman funny or a comedian? Not at all.

Letterman is pants.

Letterman is WORLDWIDE PANTS

about a week ago
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Yahoo DMARC Implementation Breaks Most Mailing Lists

rudy_wayne Re:But who uses Yahoo! mail? (83 comments)

Their best proposed solution is to ban Yahoo email users from mailing lists and encourage them to switch to other ISPs

What the fuck? Since when is Yahoo an ISP?

A lot of people use Yahoo's shitty webmail but only because they are too brain dead to use a real email client sending/receiving email via their ISP's servers.

Although I have to admit, i do like the idea of banning anyone who uses Yahoo mail.

about two weeks ago
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Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

rudy_wayne Re:I see no violation here... (1111 comments)

1) He resigned, he wasn't fired.
2) There was pressure to resign, or else be fired, sure, but the fundamental reason is that users were throwing tantrums and threatening a boycott. That seems like a legit reason to fire someone to me.

No, that's coercion.

What's been lost in all this is the fact that in 2008, the same year that Brendan Eich made that campaign contribution, Barack Obama went on national television in a debate with John McCain, and said that he believes marriage should only be between a man and a woman.

Where is the outrage over that? Why is it that Obama was elected president of the United States, twice, and Eich was forced to resign from the company he helped start?

about two weeks ago
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Windows 8.1 Update Released, With Improvements For Non-Touch Hardware

rudy_wayne Re:It's a start (294 comments)

I won't bother reciting all the things that are wrong with Windows 8, many other people have already done that in great detail. When the new "Update 1" leaked onto the Internet a few weeks ago I decided to give it a try.

The Update does make quite a few improvements and results in a system that is closer to what Windows 8 should have been in the first place. Closer, but not there. After installing the Update and doing a bit of wrangling, what you have is a system that looks and works very similar to Windows 7 except for:

(a) Uglier, shittier color scheme
(b) A "Start Screen" that takes up your entire desktop instead of a proper Start Menu that only uses the lower left quadrant, and you still don't have one of the best features that were introduced in Windows XP 12 years ago -- keeping a list of most recently used programs.
(3) Windows Explorer (now apparently renamed to File Explorer) now has the godawful "ribbon" abomination that makes it 10 times harder to use.
(d) All the other things that are wrong with Windows 8, such as installing a dozen useless "apps" on your desktop.

In other words, what's the point? Windows 8.1 Update 1 is just a shittier version of Windows 7.

about two weeks ago
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Ad Tracking: Is Anything Being Done?

rudy_wayne Re:Wear the tin foil hat (303 comments)

You can configure noscript to temparariy allow javascript from that domain by default.

Yes, that is correct. And back when Noscript was first created that approach worked just fine. But things have changed and Noscript's default behavior (block everything) just doesn't work any more. That's not Noscript's fault. That's the fault of assholes running shitty websites. Regardless, the number of pages that are horribly broken, or don't display at all (without Javascript) continues to grow. So now, every time you visit a domain you've never visited before, you have to tinker with NoScript.

Google Chrome has a feature (or used to, I haven't used it for a while) that allows you to selectively block Javascript by domain. I find this to be a better approach -- everything is whitelisted by default and you selectively block the ones you don't like.

about two weeks ago
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Ad Tracking: Is Anything Being Done?

rudy_wayne Re:Ghostery (303 comments)

I got some websites that now come up with a message begging me to stop blocking their Ad shit, they need to make money.

And those are the sites that I never visit again.

You want to make money? Charge people for whatever it is you have to offer. People spend a few Gazillions of dollars every year paying for things, so it's not like this is a new concept. If people aren't willing to pay for what you have to offer then you have nothing of value and need to die.

And nobody will even notice that you are gone.

about two weeks ago
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Ad Tracking: Is Anything Being Done?

rudy_wayne Re:solution (303 comments)

I wouldn't mind seeing a few unobtrusive adverts, particularly if they are relevant - but turn off adblock and you often get those annoying pop-up adverts that tell lies like "you computer is infected, click OK to quarantine the virus", or ones where hitting the close icon on the window launches a pop-up or download.

And that's the *REAL* problem.

We've lived with ads our entire lives. Radio, television, newspapers, magazines, etc. And it was annoying but not too terrible. But now, everything is dominated by assholes who are committed to making advertising as offensive, intrusive and dishonest as possible.

That's why CPM rates for Internet ads are so low --- everyone knows that they are nothing but shit and scams that nobody would ever click on except accidentally.

about two weeks ago
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Ad Tracking: Is Anything Being Done?

rudy_wayne Re:Wear the tin foil hat (303 comments)

Today, more and more websites are designed in a such a way that disabling Javascript breaks them completely -- you literally get nothing but a blank page.

IMHO these websites are examples of bad design . Good design should fall back to plain html/css with ideally, minimum loss of functionality

Thank you Captain Obvious.

Yes, it is bad design. But it is bad design done deliberately.

about two weeks ago
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Ad Tracking: Is Anything Being Done?

rudy_wayne Re:Wear the tin foil hat (303 comments)

Use noscript , disable cookies. If your tin foil hat is too thick , Tor it out.

The problem with Noscript is that things have changed. You used to be able to block Javascript and most websites worked well enough to still be usable. Today, more and more websites are designed in a such a way that disabling Javascript breaks them completely -- you literally get nothing but a blank page.

about two weeks ago
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Ad Tracking: Is Anything Being Done?

rudy_wayne Re:The problem is not targeted ads (303 comments)

The targeted ads are far better then random ones that mean little to the users.

No they aren't.

Targeted ads are based on something you did in the past. Just because you searched for XYZ a week ago doesn't mean you now want to see a lot of ads for XYZ everywhere you go. So called targeted ads are just as useless and random as everything else.

about two weeks ago
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Dropbox's New Policy of Scanning Files For DMCA Issues

rudy_wayne Re:Two solutions (Encrypt or leave) (243 comments)

Otherwise, stop using drop box and move on to something else.

And that "something else" will still be subject to the same bad laws (DMCA) as Dropbox.

One of the consequences of using the magical cloud is that your are bound to somebody else's rules for how they manage your data.

The problem is, this isn't Dropbox's rules. They are following the law.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Preparing For Windows XP EOL?

rudy_wayne Re:Is it really that costly? (423 comments)

but did you really expect your software to work for more than 10-15 years without needing an upgrade? .

Why not? Automobiles can last for 20 years or more with little more than minor repairs and routine maintenance. Musicians routinely use instruments made in the 1950s or earlier. But for some reason, people have bought into the absurd idea that software is obsolete and unusable after a few years.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Preparing For Windows XP EOL?

rudy_wayne Re:Antivirus is obsolete (423 comments)

Aren't actual viruses pretty rare nowadays? Most malware attacks the browser and plugins.

The term "virus" has evolved to include all forms of malware and anti-virus programs now detect more than just the traditional "virus".

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Preparing For Windows XP EOL?

rudy_wayne Re:Check you premise (423 comments)

If you think that newer versions of windows don't have anything to offer you shouldn't have to do anything at all

First, the only newer version of Windows that "has anything to offer" is Windows 7. Vista isn't as bad as some people have tried to claim, but once Windows 7 became available, Vista became meaningless and there is absolutely no reason to even consider it. Windows 8 is a mess. One of the all time worst.

But the real problem isn't that newer version of Windows don't have anything to offer. The problem is the expense of switching.. Whether it's an individual with one computer or a business with a few thousand, the cost far outweighs the benefits.

Then there is the dirty little secret of business, that isn't so secret. There are millions of computers running shitty, poorly written software that will stop working if you make the tiniest change to the underlying hardware or operating system. That makes switching even more difficult and expensive.

about three weeks ago
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Cryptocurrency Exchange Vircurex To Freeze Customer Accounts

rudy_wayne Re:The cost of an unregulated currency (357 comments)

Bitcoin became popular in no small part because many people believe government-backed currencies are overregulated or poorly managed.

No, Bitcoin became popular because a bunch of crackpots bought into a bunch of anti-government bullshit. Despite all the problems and imperfections with governments and regulations, the bitcoin nutjobs are too busy drinking the anti-government kool-aid to understand that it's precisely those governments and regulations that create stability which in turn makes a currency actually worth something.

And a few speculators looking to get rich quick.

about a month ago
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Cryptocurrency Exchange Vircurex To Freeze Customer Accounts

rudy_wayne Re:Why do people keep their bitcoins at exchanges? (357 comments)

Could someone explain why people put bitcoins in an exchange? I mean isn't the point of bitcoin that you have a copy of the blockchain on your own computer?

Why do people open an account with a stock broker? You're saying to someone "I want to buy (or sell) X, go find me someone who has X to sell (or who wants to buy it)". The whole point of an exchange, whether it's stocks or Bitcoins, is to do the work of finding buyers and sellers so you don't have to.

And it works reasonably well if the exchanges are honest (or forced to be honest by regulations). Bitcoin exchanges are not regulated in any way so they attract people who are specifically looking to rip you off. Just look at the past year. Nobody has lost any significant money from actual trading on Bitcoin exchanges. All the loses have been from exchanges taking people's money and then disappearing.

about a month ago
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Cryptocurrency Exchange Vircurex To Freeze Customer Accounts

rudy_wayne Re:Ponzi scheme (357 comments)

So, basically the same as stock exchanges and future markets.

Not really.

Yes, if you buy Bitcoins and then the price goes down you lose money, just like with stocks and futures. However, most of loses with Bitcoin has not been from normal trading activity. Almost all of the losses have been from the Bitcoin exchanges stealing people's money. That's very rare with stocks and futures due to regulation specifically designed to prevent that sort of thing. I'm not saying it never happens, but it's rare.

about a month ago
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Firefox 29 Beta Arrives With UI Overhaul And CSS3 Variables

rudy_wayne Countdown to Extinction (256 comments)

For the past couple of years the Mozilla developers have been hard at work removing features from Firefox and making it less and less useful. We've been able to (mostly) work around these stupid, pointless changes with the use of additional extensions. Having to add extensions to bring back features that have been removed is stupid, but it works.

Now, with the new "Australis" design they take things to a whole new level. Australis completely destroys almost everything that made Firefox popular in the first place. An enormous amount of flexibility and customizability has been removed. But not just removed. Completely ripped out in such a way that getting it back through extensions (which are just bits of Javascript and CSS) will be difficult, if not impossible. Extensions such as "Classic Theme Restorer" attempt to undo some of the damage, but are only able to do so in a very limited way.

Firefox, as we know it, will soon be gone. What a bunch of assholes.

about a month ago
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Gmail Goes HTTPS Only For All Connections

rudy_wayne Encryption is not the answer (141 comments)

Ultimately, encryption is meaningless. If the NSA (or any other governmental agency) wants something, they will get it.

Even if you invent some suoer-duoer-impossible-to-crack encryption, they will simply go to a secret court (that is accountable to no one) and get a secret order, that you must comply with and that you aren't allowed to talk about under penalty of going to prison, on the grounds of NATIONAL SECURITY.

Until *THAT* problem is addressed, encryption is meaningless.

about a month ago
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Firefox 28 Arrives With VP9 Video Decoding, HTML5 Volume Controls

rudy_wayne Re:I'm still alive (142 comments)

Installed the update and it didn't turn my laptop into a smoking crater on my desk; so far, so good..

Just wait till Firefox 29, aka Australisaurus (assuming they stick to their release schedule).

If you haven't had the displeasure yet, check out one of the recent beta builds. It is a marvel of stupidity and in one fell swoop Mozilla has managed to destroy almost everything that made Firefox popular in the first place.

about 1 month ago

Submissions

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Create A Botnet By Abusing Free Cloud Services

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a month and a half ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Last week at the RSA Conference, a pair of researchers demonstrated how it was possible to legally create a botnet for free by abusing trial accounts made available by high-powered platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) offerings.

The question they asked themselves was how hard would it be to automate the process of signing up for an unlimited number of free accounts from these sites and then developing a central control system from which an attacker could potentially launch malicious activities. The answer: not hard at all.

The project was made possible through the development of a process to automate the creation of unique email accounts on free email services, and then special scripting to automate the process of clicking on email verification links sent to those accounts."

Link to Original Source
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Prenda lawyer kicked off 9th Circuit case

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a year ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "On Friday, Paul Hansmeier, a Minnesota attorney who has been pointed to as one of the masterminds of the Prenda copyright-trolling scheme, filed an emergency motion to stay the $81,000 sanctions order while he and his colleagues could mount an appeal. Today the appeals court flatly denied his motion.. Two appellate judges signed this order, and it gives Hansmeier the option to make a plea for delay with the district court judge. That would be US District Judge Otis Wright, the judge who sanctioned Hansmeier in the first place.

Hansmeier is also getting kicked off a case he was working on that was totally unrelated to Prenda's scheme of making copyright accusations over alleged pornography downloads. On Friday, the 9th Circuit Commissioner ordered Hansmeier, in no uncertain terms, to withdraw a the case involving Groupon since he has been referred to the Minnesota State Bar for investigation. The commissioner has delayed Hansmeier's admission to the 9th Circuit because of Wright's order, which refers to Wright's finding of "moral turpitude.""
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Judge hints at jail time for porn troll Prenda Law

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about a year ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "A federal judge in Los Angeles has suggested serious penalties for Brett Gibbs, an attorney at porn copyright trolling firm Prenda Law. Facing allegations of fraud and identity theft, Gibbs will be required to explain himself at a March 11 hearing. And if Judge Otis Wright isn't satisfied with his answers, he may face fines and even jail time.

The identity theft allegations emerged late last year, when a Minnesota man named Alan Cooper told a Minnesota court he suspected Prenda Law named him as the CEO of two litigious offshore holding companies without his permission. Worried about exposing himself to potential liability for the firms' misconduct, Cooper asked the court to investigate the situation. Cooper's letter was spotted by Morgan Pietz, an attorney who represents "John Doe" defendants in California. He notified Judge Wright of the allegations."

Link to Original Source
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Millions Will Go to Privacy Groups Who Support Weak Facebook Settlement

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Privacy and consumer groups are urging a federal judge to sign off on a controversial settlement to a class-action lawsuit over Facebook's “Sponsored Stories” advertising program, despite indifference to or confusion over the terms of the vaguely written settlement. Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy in Washington, D.C., said the settlement amounts to “just putting some more words into Facebook’s privacy policy that nobody reads.”

However, the Electronic Freedom Foundation which would receive $1 Million under the settlement (almost one-fourth of their entire budget last year) supports the settlement "for budgetary reasons" and according to EFF legal director Cindy Cohn, “We haven’t taken a position on this settlement, whether it’s a good idea or not”."

Link to Original Source
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Wikipedia Didn't Kill Brittanica. Windows Did

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "The end of Encyclopedia Brittanica has been widely reported and its demise has been blamed on Wikipedia. However, this article at Wired points out that the real reason is something entirely different.

"In 1990 Brittanica had $650 million in revenue. In 1996, long before Wikipedia existed, it was bankrupt and the entire company was sold for $135 million. What happened in between was Encarta. Even though Encarta didn't make money for Microsoft and Brittanica produced its own encyclopedia CDs, Encarta was an inexpensive, multimedia encyclopedia that helped Microsoft sell Windows PCs to families. And once you had a PC in the living room or den where the encyclopedia used to be, it was all over for Mighty Brittanica. It’s not that Encarta made knowledge cheaper, it’s that technology supplanted its role as a purchasable ‘edge’ for over-anxious parents. They bought junior a new PC instead of a Britannica. When Wikipedia emerged five years later, Brittanica was already a weakened giant. It wasn’t a free and open encyclopedia that defeated its print edition. It was the personal computer itself.""

Link to Original Source
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How to "Brick" a car

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "According to an article at The Understatement:: A Tesla Roadster that is simply parked without being plugged in will eventually become a “brick”. The parasitic load from the car’s always-on subsystems continually drains the battery and if the battery’s charge is ever totally depleted, it is essentially destroyed. The only known remedy is for the owner to pay Tesla approximately $40,000 to replace the entire battery. Unlike practically every other modern car problem, neither Tesla’s warranty nor typical car insurance policies provide any protection from this major financial loss. Of the approximately 2,200 Roadsters sold to date, a regional service manager for Tesla says he is personally aware of at least five cases of Tesla Roadsters being “bricked” due to battery depletion."
Link to Original Source
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The Problem With Online Ads

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Clive Thompson has an article in Wired magazine about the problem with online advertising. For years, everyone has claimed that you can’t charge for anything online. If you dream up a cool new idea, your only way to make money is to generate as many impressions as possible for advertisers. This inevitably produces horrid, cynical designs that work against what people want — such as clogging pages with distracting banners or breaking them into smaller chunks so users have to click around a lot.

But a new generation of web entrepreneurs has discovered the joys of charging users cold, hard cash. Along with sites like Pinboard (similar to Del.icio.us), there’s the read-it-later service Instapaper, private social-network site Ning, and countless iPhone apps that require you to lay down coin. If we’re lucky, this trend will save the Internet from one of the most corrosive forces affecting it: advertising."

Link to Original Source
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News Corp. looking to sell MySpace

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes ""The Wall Street Journal is reporting that News. Corp is trying to sell MySpace for $100 Million, a fraction of the $580 Million that it originally paid in 2005. Parties reportedly interested in acquiring MySpace include private equity firm THL Partners, Redscout Ventures and Criterion Capital, owner of social network Bebo (the company AOL bought for $850 Million and then sold for $10 Million). Chinese Internet holding company Tencent is also reportedly interested and so is Myspace co-founder Chris De Wolfe. What’s not yet clear is what any of these companies plan to do with MySpace if a sale goes through.""
Link to Original Source
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News Corp. trying to sell MySpace

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "The Wall Street Journal has reported that News. Corp is trying to sell MySpace for $100 Million, a fraction of the $580 Million that it paid for MySpace in 2005. Parties reportedly interested in acquiring MySpace include private equity firm THL Partners, Redscout Ventures and Criterion Capital, owner of social network Bebo (the company AOL bought for $850 Million and then sold for $10 Million). Chinese Internet holding company Tencent is also reportedly interested as is Myspace co-founder Chris De Wolfe. What’s not yet clear is what any of these companies plan to do with MySpace if a sale goes through."
Link to Original Source
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Dish Network Buys Blockbuster

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Dish Network won a bankruptcy auction for Blockbuster with a bid of $320 million and on the surface the deal sounds a little bit crazy. What’s Dish going to do with 1,700 store locations and a brand that’s arguably broken? The real win here may be the Internet streaming rights that Dish will now own. Kaufman Bros. analyst Todd Mitchell wrote: "As part of an acquisition, DISH would presumably get Blockbuster’s Internet streaming rights, the Blockbuster brand and its customer lists. Combined with a build-out of the wireless spectrum it has acquired and technology from EchoStar and Hughes, we believe DISH could launch an on demand movie service that would 1) significantly enhance the competitive offering of the DISH Network, and 2) compete on a standalone basis with Netflix and other over-the-top video services." Dish’s set-top boxes already have an Ethernet port so adding streaming content wouldn’t be much of a stretch."
Link to Original Source
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Internet Explorer will survive and Firefox won't

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  about 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "There is an interesting (and probably controversial) piece on on Why Internet Explorer will survive and Firefox won't

"It’s tempting to look at Microsoft’s history with Internet Explorer and assume that they are just incapable of working at the speed of the Internet. But take a closer look at the development process for IE 9 and there’s a different story to tell. Microsoft is playing the same game as Google. Mozilla is stuck in 2005. And that’s why the core of Internet Explorer will still be around in five years when Firefox will have, at best, a loyal cult following."

"At last year’s MIX conference, Microsoft talked about its new app platform: write code once, target for multiple platforms. That’s the same space that Google is playing in. Google has an entire family of apps that are designed to work exclusively in a browser."

"So where does that leave Firefox? It doesn’t have an app ecosystem or a loyal core of developers. Extensions? Those were worth bragging about in 2005, but in 2012 the story is apps. Businesses and consumers will want to use the same browser that powers their installed apps. In the PC space, that means Google or Microsoft. It doesn’t leave room for a third player.""

Link to Original Source
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How to crash the Internet

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "We know you can take down Web sites with Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. We know that a country, like Egypt, can shut down a country’s entire Internet access. And, we thought we knew that you can't take down the entire Internet.

It turns out we could be wrong.

In a report from New Scientist, Max Schuchard a computer science graduate student and his buddies claim they've found a way to launch DDoS attacks on Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) network routers that could crash the Internet."
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Google, H.264 and WebM - the mud clears (sort of)

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "When it was announced that H.264 was being dropped from Google's Chrome browser I thought it was really weird since Google converted all of YouTube's videos to H.264 just 3 years ago. Now, Charles Arthur, writing for The Guardian says the decision to drop H.264 was made entirely by the Chrome team and did not come from Google's top management. A related article at ZDNet sums it up as "Google is not giving up H.264 on YouTube, H.264 will continue to be supported in Android, and it has nothing to do with YouTube storage issues, H.264 license pricing or Google's desire to be totally open source — it's about Chrome wanting to be disruptive."
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The strange disappearance of Dancho Danchev

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "ZDNet is reporting that Zero Day blogger and malware researcher Dancho Danchev has gone missing since August of last year. Dancho, who was relentless in his pursuit of cyber-criminals, last blogged here on August 18. His personal blog has not been updated since September 11, 2010.

At ZDNet, we made multiple attempts to contact him, to no avail. Telephone numbers are going to Bulgarian language voicemails and our attempts to reach him via a snail mail address also came up empty. Just recently, a trusted member of the malware research community reached out to us to say he had received a troubling letter from Dancho on September 9, 2010, about the threat of persecution in Bulgaria."
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Porn & recipes found on Toronto's dead drop

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes ""Whenever I think of people secretly exchanging information, I envision money bags left behind loose bricks and secret documents hidden in a hollowed out book. As it turns out, this method of sharing information has a name — it's called a "dead drop". In October 2010, Berlin-based media artist Aram Bartholl decided to modernize the idea and created five USB dead drops in New York City. The idea is simple: a USB flash drive is embedded into a wall or other public space using cement. After that, anyone can access the drive and leave and take files as they please."

According to Lauren Souch at blogTO, "In early November, a dead drop appeared in Toronto. The drop currently contains twelve recipes, a list of fictional drug use in movies (with hyperlinks!) and a guide on how to make a homemade stun glove using a disposable camera. Of course, there are also a number of pictures loaded on the USB — 45 to be exact — and I was not surprised to find roughly 40% of the pictures are either half-naked women or porn.""
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Prototype of first portable Mac listed on Ebay

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "This Ebay listing claims to be for a prototype of the first portable Mac, circa 1990. The listing describes the unit as "absolutely mint, flawless, clean" which apparently only applies to the outside of the computer, since inside it contains a dead Lead-Acid battery."
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Is the source of open source the root of all evil?

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Dana Blankenhorn at ZDNet says "Most open source software does not come from open source companies, or the open source community. It comes from proprietary companies. It comes from folks wanting to sell stuff by connecting their wares to the power open source provides." To back up this claim, he points to an article written by Matt Assay, COO of Canonical:

Google contributes more open-source software than Red Hat, for example, most recently open sourcing an Apache server module for improving website performance. And as the software world moves to the web, Facebook, Yahoo!, Twitter, and even Microsoft (gasp!) will outpace their open-source peers in terms of open-source software contributions. The less software is responsible for directly driving sales, the more it will find itself under an open-source license, written by companies who would never describe themselves as open-source software companies, or software companies at all.

"
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Open letter to Steve Jobs: Retire Now

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "David Gewirtz at ZDNet writes:

Friday’s event was deeply disturbing. There you were, up there on stage, mocking genuinely valid concerns over the fundamental performance of your flagship product, arrogantly denying credible analysis by some of the most reputable product testers on the planet, telling members of the press that you love your users so much that you've built 300 Apple retail stores just for them. The whole thing was embarrassing. It was beneath you.

Bill Gates has become one of the world's leading philanthropists, probably the most generous and effective in the history of the mankind. By comparison, you're spending your days (and, apparently, your nights) arguing with consumers who bought a $200 phone and complaining that Consumer Reports doesn't know how to test consumer products. Almost 30 years ago, John Scully was at Pepsi and you asked him, oeDo you want to sell sugar water for the rest of your life, or do you want to come with me and change the world?

So, Steve, here's the question I ask you: oeDo you want to sell crappy phones and consumer electronics for the rest of your life, or do you want to leave Apple and change the world?"
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iPhone Class Action lawsuit will go forward

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "ZDNet reports that a federal judge in California decided that several civil lawsuits filed against Apple and AT&T since 2007 — which address a number of antitrust concerns — could now be consolidated into a single class action in federal court and could proceed accordingly.

The main thrust of the lass action will be about carrier/device lock-in — The plaintiffs contend that even though they entered a two-year agreement when they bought their iPhones, they were really forced into a five year agreement for voice and data services on their devices without their consent, and after two years, they could not unlock their phones and take them to another compatible carrier, such as T-Mobile. They also contend that the iPhone became unusable if a customer had unlocked it for use on another service provider (such as T-Mobile)."
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HD DVD returns and kicks Blu-ray to the gutter

rudy_wayne rudy_wayne writes  |  more than 4 years ago

rudy_wayne (414635) writes "Just when Blu-ray thought it had clear sailing, a tempest has risen in the East: China Blue Hi-definition Disk (CBHD). Toshiba has licensed its HD DVD to them and it will be the unit world leader in HD optical technology in just 12 months. Why? The CBHD players are outselling Blu-ray in China by 3-1 and the CBHD disks cost a quarter of Blu-ray.

The Times Online reports: "China's gambit comes just 18 months after the Blu-ray Disc consortium — a 100-strong group of technology and media companies led by Sony — declared victory over the similarly sized HD-DVD Forum led by Toshiba. Warner Bros, whose support for Blu-ray was the deciding factor during the 2008 war, has said it will support the new format as the technology finds its feet.""

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