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Comments

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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

s.petry Re:no, dickhead (144 comments)

Right, because the military is the worst possible place to learn about the military. I'm better asking Richard Jewel about 2 man tactics than I am reading a military TM, which provides the history and theory as well as the tactics.

Just like your stupid ass bayonet claim, it's fucking wrong. The US Military does not have any serrations on their weapons because of Geneva conventions. It can not be used as a multipurpose tool, and has not been issued as a multipurpose tool for that exact reason. If you need to saw rope, you have to use an entrenching tool.

Contrary to your pathetic attempt at an ad hominem, the source is usually the best way to get information. Not always, but military doctrine and principles are very well documented and available to every soldier that wants to go read. Those same books are not always available to the public, so your Wiki page != US Military Libraries.

Lastly, before you go another round of pathetic fallacy, learn what "one of many" means and then reread the post.

5 hours ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

s.petry Re: no, dickhead (144 comments)

Your troll does not make sense. If ball ammo has longer range how the fuck can this possibly relate to close quarters combat? Fuck you are stupid.

5 hours ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

s.petry Re:Absolutely false (144 comments)

The Geneva convention explicitly restricts the use of a serrated blades in combat. It has nothing to do with sticking in enemies, sorry.

6 hours ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

s.petry Re:wounding != maiming (144 comments)

Best is something that takes you out of commission for a while, but causes no permanent damage

From a law enforcement perspective I absolutely agree with you. From a military perspective, this is not true. You don't want to blind someone for 24 hours and have them back on the battlefield (as one example of obviously many).

I'm happy to share knowledge and ideas with you, but we should set terms and ensure that we are discussing the same subject. I posted this due to someone presenting a false military doctrine. If we attempt to merge military and law enforcement doctrines we end up with conflicting ideology in the same generalization because the goals are not compatible. Reading what you wrote above, it appears that you are trying to merge the two hence. I have concern in continuing dialogue.

6 hours ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

s.petry Re:no, dickhead (144 comments)

Prior to typing next time, join the Military or ask a Veteran. The military taught us in boot camp why it was selected over a heavier round. Tumbling rounds are able to travel a farther distance than a hollow point round, and hold more energy at a longer distance. In two sentences you managed to fabricate two fairy tales. What an outstanding example of a moron you are, no wonder you post anonymously.

6 hours ago
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How Governments Are Getting Around the UN's Ban On Blinding Laser Weapons

s.petry Absolutely false (144 comments)

One of the primary reasons that the US Military went with a 5.56mm round instead of the standard 7.62mm is because it does not kill, it wounds people more often. Military Philosophy is that if you wound an enemy, it takes 3 soldiers out of commission and demoralizes them. The wounded soldier, a medic, and someone to carry the guy to the medic. Killing someone only takes 1 person out of commission, and will often make enrage their companions.

The convention against certain types of weapons had nothing to do with not wounding someone, it had to do with humane ways of wounding and killing people. This is why it's perfectly fine to stab someone with a smooth bayonet but you can not stab someone with a serrated bayonet, even though death from serrated bayonet was more likely. You can stitch up a wound from one pretty easily, the other is going to leave a big mess that probably won't be closable..

8 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Re:Lets not forget (443 comments)

The type of behavior that a "tax" attempts to modify does not matter. Study history and economics. Taxes do not work, and have never worked in any history or economics system as an attempt to modify behavior. Those types of taxes only harm consumers (see slavery and force toll roads)

Or don't and continue to believe in some fantasy world that does not exist. You can believe in your fantasy, but that does not make it real and should not be expressed falsely as any reality.

8 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Re:Lets not forget (443 comments)

A Pigovian tax is a subset of taxes claiming it will modify a specific behavior. You somehow believe that it will work, even though taxes have never changed any other subset of bad/immoral business behavior. In general terms, your pigovian tax is no different than a slavery tax and would bring the same result. No end of bad behavior, just higher cost to consumers and increased revenue for the people that own the companies behaving badly.

As stated, taxes are not enforced regulation. Historical attempts to use taxes as enforced regulations have all failed.

9 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Re:Lets not forget (443 comments)

But you still took the opportunity to take a shot at Obama and talk about Agenda 21 and I don't see why were either of those were relevant.

Pt. 1. Al Gore started preaching exactly what Agenda 21 is. If you don't see the relevance then you are really not looking.

Pt. 2. Al Gore received a Nobel prize for his position on both Global Warming and Carbon Taxes. As with above, if you don't see the relevance you are not trying.

10 hours ago
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Oculus Rift CEO Says Classrooms of the Future Will Be In VR Goggles

s.petry Re:Some classes would be AWESOME! (177 comments)

What you need to prove the claim I quoted and disapprove of. You claimed, and I'll add incorrectly, that VR corrects all of the other problems with media as an education platform. This would be easily proved if it was true, but the fact is that VR is going to add about as much as TV to education.

No, you can't move the goal post to technology that is not here. The TFA is not a concept based on future technology, it's about current technology and false claims.

11 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Re:Lets not forget (443 comments)

What? So taxing slavery is what ended slavery? Taxing voting unbiased the voting system? Come on now, I'm not a lunatic that believes nobody should be taxed but your assertion is provably wrong.

I believe you are trying to equate "Enforced Regulation" with "Tax" where no equality can exist.

11 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Re:Lets not forget (443 comments)

That is one of the most idiotic replies I have ever received. You sir are trolling, and inventing statements never made to troll with.

11 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Re:Lets not forget (443 comments)

I'm sorry. Tell me again how taxation (which is what cap-and-trade does) is a "Al Gore" idea.

Where did I ever say any of these things were an "Al Gore" idea or restrict carbon tax to the same? Hint: Never happened.

You bring up some interesting points, but those points don't change the facts I brought up about Al Gore.

12 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Re:Lets not forget (443 comments)

Why do I get the feeling your opinions are driven by partisanship instead of science and economics?

Probably because instead of asking for my opinion you provide your own. You can read my post history, I'm anything but partisan on just about every subject. False dilemmas don't really address problems, they merely cover them up.

12 hours ago
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Extent of Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches Record Levels

s.petry Lets not forget (443 comments)

Al Gore has made a fortune peddling "global warming", and even received the Nobel Peace prize for his peddling (not surprising, Obama won it for merely speaking an opinion).

Yes, we need to change how we interact with the Earth and there are some real problems. Pollution is a real problem, long term energy without fossil fuels is a problem, and I could co on. A "Carbon Tax" is not the way to solve the problems, and this is the solution that has been peddled by Al Gore and countless others trying to implement Agenda 21.

13 hours ago
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Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two

s.petry Re:You make the other side's point ... (121 comments)

No, I introduced mercenaries specifically because they meet the same criteria of the sacrifice of putting their lives at risk for extended periods of time.

Which is a fallacy argument. The only way that argument could be valid is if Mercenary and Soldiers had everything in common, which they don't.

Followed immediately by yet another attempt at muddying waters.

I would suggest that you learn some basic rhetoric skills prior to debating me in the future. I refuse to make additional comments since you can neither hold a rational thought nor express an opinion rationally (take the hint, your position is indefensible, irrational, and illogical).

13 hours ago
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Oculus Rift CEO Says Classrooms of the Future Will Be In VR Goggles

s.petry Re:Some classes would be AWESOME! (177 comments)

I can assure you that chat rooms, phones, even webcams and the like, do not cut it for human interaction. So much is lost in the subtle body language, the eyes, the stance, the arms folded. VR could change all that. If I can finally see you properly, look you in the eye, share a virtual whiteboard, then it will truly no longer matter if we are in the same office. Or classroom.

Prove it! Incredible claims require incredible evidence and all that. Further, you need to prove that it benefits general education in order to make a claim that it benefits general schools.

I spent 15 years building VR including motion detection. Not just helmets, but also CAVE and Powerwall systems from 10x8' to 12x10'. This included motion platforms for vehicle simulation. While there are surely beneficial applications for this technology, absolutely none of those benefits translate to general education.

To GPs point about High School Physics, what benefit is there to the average school? You have to learn the basics to learn something advanced, there is no exception to that rule. A good school that already has the basics can have some "cool" reinforcement viewing simulation, but everyone else would just be wasting time trying to simulate what they don't know. That aspect causes much more harm than good.

Public Education is supposed to be for the majority, not the minority. Nothing stops an advanced school from doing more than public education requires so that can't be the argument.

yesterday
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Oculus Rift CEO Says Classrooms of the Future Will Be In VR Goggles

s.petry Ignorance is bliss... (177 comments)

VR is not comparable in any way shape or form to the automobile. VR has very specific applications and benefits, none of which should have anything to do with education until very late into education. I have built VR CAVE and PowerWall systems and developed VR programs, and assure you that there is no benefit to standard education. If you have doubts, go out into the world and look at real word benefits. I do mean actual benefits, not just some "cool technology" factor. Hint: Human Factors Engineering surely can benefit from VR, as can very advanced kinematics. Neither of those two subjects are in standard classrooms, and both require advanced degrees and a tremendous amount of knowledge in specific software to build the models and simulations.

Further, none of the subjects that could benefit from VR should be taught in standard education. Not because any education is bad mind you. The reasoning is A) cost B) Time (you would have to give up a lot of other general education) and C) Not enough people would or could benefit.

If you wish to argue that it should be taught, ask yourself why other advanced degrees are not mandatory.

yesterday
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Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two

s.petry Re:You make the other side's point ... (121 comments)

Bullshit, followed by more Bullshit. Your point is absolutely false and I have demonstrated that it is false numerous times. Try reading the thread again. You introduced the mercenary argument on your own because you are trying (incorrectly) to claim that the job is identical to a soldiers. There is no such equivalency in regards to a soldier losing their natural human rights and rights every other citizen is provided.

Your last sentence is an attempt to muddy the waters, nothing more.

You can not debate the points, you instead introduce fallacy after fallacy to maintain a delusion. I'm not impressed, but then again not surprised.

3 days ago
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Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two

s.petry Re:You make the other side's point ... (121 comments)

Wow, nothing like arguing intangibles. A mercenary is not a soldier. By definition, a mercenary is a hired thug who can choose which jobs to take and which to decline. Mercenaries don't have to live by social normals and have no public oversight or public pay.

Will you next try and bring up jobs from science fiction novels to argue with?

3 days ago

Submissions

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Slashdot Beta Woes

s.petry s.petry writes  |  about 7 months ago

s.petry (762400) writes "What is a Slashdot and why the Beta might destroy it?

Slashdot has been around, well, a very long time. Longer than any of it's competators, but not as long as IIRC. Slashdot was a very much one of the first true social media web sites.

On Slashdot, you could create a handle or ID. Something personal, but not too personal, unless you wanted it to be. But it was not required either. We know each other by our handles, we have watched each other grow as people. We may have even taken pot shots at each other in threads. Unless of course you are anonymous, but often we can guess who that really is.

One of Slashdot's first motto's was "News for Nerds" that Matters. I have no idea when that was removed. I have not always scoured the boards here daily, life can get too busy for that. That excuses my ignorance in a way. I guess someone thought it politically incorrect, but most of us "Nerds" enjoyed it. We are proud of who we are, and what we know. Often we use that pride and knowledge to make someone else look bad. That is how we get our digs in, and we enjoy that part of us too. We don't punch people, we belittle them. It's who we are!

What made Slashdot unique were a few things. What you will note here is "who" has been responsible for the success of Slashdot. Hint, it has never been a just the company taking care of the servers and software.

— First, the user base submitted stories that "they" thought mattered. It was not a corporate feed. Sure, stories were submitted about companies. The latest break through from AMD and Intel, various stories regarding the graphic card wars, my compiler is better than your compiler, and yes your scripting language stinks! Microsoft IIS has brought us all a few laughs and lots of flame wars to boot. Still, we not only read about the products but get to my second point.

— User comments. This is the primary why we have been coming here for as long as we have, many of us for decades. We provide alternative opinions or back what was given in the article. This aspect not only makes the "News" interesting, but often leads to other news and information sharing. It's not always positive, but this is the nature of allowing commentary. It also brings out the third point.

— Moderation. Moderation has been done by the community for a very long time. It took lots of trial and error to get a working system. As with any public system it's imperfect, but it's been successful. People can choose to view poorly modded comments, but don't have to. As with posting anonymous versus with our own handle it's an option that allows us to personalize the way we see and read what's on the site. And as a reward for submitting something worth reading, you might get a mod point of your own to use as a reward for someone else.

Why we dislike Beta and what is being pushed, and why this will result in the end of an era if it becomes forced on the community.

1. Bulky graphics. We get that Dice and Slashdot need revenue. I have Karma good enough to disable advertisements, but have never kept this setting on. I realize that Slashdot/Dice make money with this. That said, the ads sit away from my news and out of the way. I can get there if I want it (but nobody has ever gotten a penny from me clicking an ad... nobody!), but it's not forced into my face or news feed.

2. Low text area. I like having enough on my screen to keep me busy without constant scrolling. Slashdot currently has the correct ratio of text to screen. This ratio has never been complained about, yet Beta reduces the usable text area by at least 1/2 and no option for changing the behavior. I hate reading Slashdot on mobile devices because I can't stand scrolling constantly.

3. JavaScript. We all know the risks of JS, and many of us disable it. We also have an option of reading in Lync or non-standard browsers that many of us toy with for both personal and professional reasons. This flexibility is gone in Beta, and we are forced to allow JS to run. If you don't know the risks of allowing JS to run, you probably don't read much on Slashdot. Those that allow JS do so accepting the risk (which is admittedly low on a well known site).

4. Ordering/Sorting/Referencing. Each entry currently gets tagged with a unique thread ID. This allows linking to the exact post in a thread, not just the top of the thread. In Beta this is gone. It could be that the site decided to simply hide the post ID or it was removed. Either way, going to specific posts is something that is used very commonly by the community.

5. Eye candy. Most of us are not here for "eye candy" and many have allergic reactions to eye candy. Slashdot has a good mix currently. It's not as simple as the site starting with a r-e-d-i-t, which is good. That site has a reputation that keeps many of us away, and their format matches my attitude of them (s-i-m-p-l-e-t-o-n). At the same time, it's not like watching some other "news" sites with so much scrolling crap I can't read an article without getting a headache. The wasted space in beta for big bulky borders, sure smells like eye candy. Nothing buzzes or scrolls yet, but we can sense what's coming in a patch later.

The thing is, the community cares about Slashdot. We come here because we care. We submit stories because of that, we vote because of that, we moderate because of that, and we comment because of that. At the same time we realize that without the community Slashdot loses most of its value. We respect that we don't host the servers, backup the databases, or patch the servers. Slashdot/Dice provide the services needed for Slashdot.

It's a give give relationship, and we each get something in return. Slashdot gets tons of Search hits and lots of web traffic. We get a place to learn, teach, and occasionally vent.

Look, if you want to change default color scheme or make pre-made palettes for us to choose from, we would probably be okay with that. If you want to take away our ability to block ads by Karma, or move the ads to the left side of my browser window, I would be okay with those things too.

If you want to make drastic changes to how the site works, this is a different story all together. The reason so many are against Beta is that it breaks some of the fundamental parts of what makes Slashdot work.

User input until recently has not been acknowledged. The acknowledgment we have received is not from the people that are making the decision to push Beta live. We told people Beta was broken, what it lacked, and we were rather surprised to get a warning that Beta would be live despite what we told people. People are already making plans to leave, which means that Slashdot could fade away very soon.

Whether this was the goal for Dice or not remains to be seen. If it is, it's been nice knowing you but I won't be back. A partnership only works when there is mutual respect between the parties. A word of caution, us Nerds have good memories and lots of knowledge. The loss of Slashdot impacts all of Dice holdings, not just Slashdot. I boycott everything a company holds, not just the product group that did me wrong.

If that was not the goal of Dice, you should quickly begin communicating with the user base. What are the plans are to fix what Beta has broken? Why is Beta being pushed live with things broken? A "Sorry we have not been communicating!", and perhaps even a "Thank you" to the user base for helping make Slashdot a success for so many years."
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Limiting debate in science, is it still science?

s.petry s.petry writes  |  about a year ago

s.petry (762400) writes "We knew that this was coming, but I'm sure many of us thought that science would be immune to censorship. Perhaps not. I was not surprised that it happened on Boing Boing, but on a "science" site I never expected it (at least not this quickly).

These decisions may smack some as subjective or even malicious. After all comments are arguably the digital age response to print's "letter to the editor" — and they often contain criticisms of the article ranging from grammatical erorrs to factual oversights. Some may view the decision to ban comments as a form of censorship, a means for writers to escape any sort of visible accountability among their audience.

While that statement does not get to the meaty subject of real trolling and sock puppets, it does beg a very important set of questions. Especially when the reason for Popular Science from them claims:

And because comments sections tend to be a grotesque reflection of the media culture surrounding them, the cynical work of undermining bedrock scientific doctrine is now being done beneath our own stories, within a website devoted to championing science.

As the article points out, Science is not about doctrine. Science is about methods of proof. Science also requires collaboration and gets much better when numerous minds work on and debate the Science.

Is censorship the right direction, or is finding more intelligent ways of reducing sock puppets and trolls through moderation?"

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