×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Who's To Blame For Rules That Block Tesla Sales In Most US States?

sabri Re:Turf (122 comments)

Of course I have only been involved in the automotive industry for 45 years, so maybe you are correct

That's the core of your problem: you're to stuck in your legacy views of the automobile market to spot the trends and changes.

yesterday
top

11 Trillion Gallons of Water Needed To End California Drought

sabri Re:But but but (315 comments)

Surely there is a technological fix for this?

If I look outside the window of my little office in Santa Clara, the patch has already been applied. It has been raining all day!

2 days ago
top

Every Weapon, Armored Truck, and Plane the Pentagon Gave To Local Police

sabri Re:$1000 Flashlights? (191 comments)

And why did they give our local PD 145 flashlights worth $130K? What does a thousand-dollar flashlight even /look/ like?

I was going to post exactly the same thing, so you must be from Santa Clara County as well.

$896 for a flashlight... But what about the 6 camouflage sets for $26k? Do they fly?

about two weeks ago
top

Aliens Are Probably Everywhere, Just Not Anywhere Nearby

sabri Re:Paradoxes Be Damned (334 comments)

The speed limit is c. It's the law.

Then I suggest we vote the current corrupt politicians out of office and get us some new ones that increase the speed limit!

about two weeks ago
top

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

sabri Re:I wonder who bought him (216 comments)

Thanks. Why wouldn't radar work? Mountainous roads?

Radar will work, but radar-detectors won't. So a speeder can not rely on his companion-in-crime...

about two weeks ago
top

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

sabri Re:I wonder who bought him (216 comments)

I doubt that the sensors you're talking about are for speed enforcement: That's easily done with radar and photos.

In many countries fixed-base speed traps are built using inductive loop detectors (the pneumatic ones aren't that good). One of the reasons is that radar-detectors won't work...

about two weeks ago
top

UK Announces 'Google Tax'

sabri Re:There is no single "fair" value. (602 comments)

What I don't like is when the government becomes an engine for wealth redistribution, forced charity, or social engineering experiments.

My kingdom for modpoints.

about two weeks ago
top

Football Concussion Lawsuits Start To Hit High Schools

sabri Re:Soccer and other helmetless football codes (233 comments)

Good, hand-egg is for pussies; it is a bunch of obese men tackling each other. You want athletic, go football.

Fixed that for you.

What North-Americans call "football" is nothing more than a bunch of men holding an egg-shaped object in their hands, hence the term hand-egg. The rest of the world calls the game where 2 opposing teams of 11 men touch a ball-shaped object with primarily their feet football.

about three weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Making a 'Wife Friendly' Gaming PC?

sabri Re:Don't fight it (720 comments)

The living case of "I'll format him when we get married".

Between the time of engagement and the wedding, I behaved like an absolute baboon. I farted, burped, left my dirty socks (and worse) everywhere around the house. Every time I got a complaint, I smiled and asked her "Are you sure you want to marry me? I'm not going to change after we're married".

The "idiot"* still married me, and the few times when she does complain, I'll point her to our engagement period.

* idiot because she was the only person of womankind stupid enough to marry me :)

about three weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Making a 'Wife Friendly' Gaming PC?

sabri Re:Don't fight it (720 comments)

There seems to be a double standard where people are expected to make all sorts of completely unnecessary sacrifices to appease some control freak partner, but the partner doesn't take into account the other person's feelings, as if their own are any more important.

This is the type of thing you keep in mind before getting married...

about three weeks ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Making a 'Wife Friendly' Gaming PC?

sabri Re:Don't fight it (720 comments)

New phase of your life. I think all of married mankind will agree with this:

Happy wife, happy life.

Seriously. Keep her happy.

about three weeks ago
top

FAA Report Says Near Collisions With Drones On the Rise

sabri Re:Birds (115 comments)

Consider that most 'drones' are very tiny light weight items more akin to a good old fashion toy R/C model airplane than what people think of as 'DRONES' as in war planes. When a real drone gets hit by a full size airplane, such as the 767 mentioned in the article, the real drone is destroyed and the 767 will not even notice the gnat with the possible exception being if a big drone went through the engine which would possibly cause damage but be unlikely to disable the large aircraft.

I've seen (and reported to ATC) a drone flying at 3500ft over Palo Alto. I was flying a 172 at the time. Do you have any idea what happens if I would hit that thing at 140mph? It could severely damage flight controls (image the tail being hit), engine, prop or air intake. Not to mention the damage if it somehow got through the windscreen (they're not bulletproof, you know).

As far as I am concerned, drones are aircraft and should be regulated as such. Manned or unmanned. If someone is flying an aircraft (whether the pilot is on the ground or inside) s/he should know the rules of the sky.

about three weeks ago
top

FAA Report Says Near Collisions With Drones On the Rise

sabri Re: *sigh* (115 comments)

Dji phantoms won't let you fly near airports, the onboard gps knows the location of every airport and will not allow it. The app even displays a message saying restricted airspace and will not allow flight into it.

If they're that smart, why not do it for class A (IFR only), B (PPR), C (2 way communication and transponder required) and D (2 way communication required) airspace as well?

I'm pretty sure those things won't be carrying transponders (or ADS-B as required in a few years), nor will they be able to talk to ATC.

about three weeks ago
top

Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

sabri Re:But correct != complete and fairly representati (193 comments)

Yes, of course. And domain names are utterly irrelevant to this.

A state can only impose sanctions against a business to the extent that the business falls within its jurisdiction, but otherwise no business has any power to override national laws in nations where it operates, so it has to play by the rules or accept the consequences. It really is as simple as that.

I think you have just proven my point. Google operates in Germany with its google.de domain name and its own Google legal entity for Germany. Google operates in The Netherlands with its google.nl domain name and its own Google legal entity for The Netherlands. Google operates in Belgium with its google.be domain name and its own Google legal entity for Belgium. Google operates in the US with its google.com domain name and Google Inc.

Why would some local I-feel-important politician that hasn't even been chosen directly in The Netherlands be in the position to dictate a foreign entity what to do? Let them have jurisdiction of google.nl.

Lawmakers need to simply accept the consequences that connecting to a global network (the internet) means that there are boundaries with regards to their legal jurisdiction. If the EU does not want to deal with American companies, they should choose to disconnect. If China can do it, then the EU can do it as well. And I honestly, honestly do not see a difference between the censorship in China and the censorship of the EU. Well, maybe one thing: at least China does it openly.

about three weeks ago
top

Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

sabri Re:But correct != complete and fairly representati (193 comments)

In law, you can only ever go after someone within your jurisdiction, and in this case either or both of the original source and a search engine that directs people to it would be required by law to comply if they are within that jurisdiction.

Ok, so your point is that as long as Google operates within a certain country, it should comply with all laws in that country? Take this one step further. Google operates in China, do you expect Google to comply with all Chinese laws, including censorship, as well? No of course you don't. Chinese law is applied on google.cn, not on google.com.

And this is exactly what's going on here, according to TFA, or even the summary:

Google currently de-lists results that appear in the European versions of its search engines, but not the international one.

This would imply that China (or the EU for that matter) is now forcing its own laws on the international version of Google. Which means that they would be grossly overstepping the bounds of their own jurisdiction.

And for what it's worth: there is no such thing as EU law. There are EU directives, which have to be implemented into local law by its member states. Which means that, assuming you agree with me on the China analogy, Google would only have to censor individual country-specific TLD search results such as google.nl, google.de, google.be etc. And what is happening now is that the EU tries to force Google to change the international version of Google, meaning it is attempting to shove EU directives through the rest of the world's throats.

about three weeks ago
top

Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

sabri Re:But correct != complete and fairly representati (193 comments)

I'm arguing that because of human nature search engines should be required not to promote misleading or inaccurate information that may lead to unfair inferences being drawn about innocent people, once the search engines are explicitly made aware that they are doing so.

Unfortunately from this point of view, there are plenty of places in the world where they will tell you to go hang, because their right to mislead people about you is more important than your right to be treated fairly. This law is the closest we have right now to routing around that problem.

Ok, so we have nailed your point of view down to "we can't control the content of the book, but we do control the table of content". Don't you think that's a bit like shooting the messenger? Furthermore, don't you think that you're now placing an undue burden on a company that has nothing to do with the content that is being indexed?

I find this a typical case of where governments go wrong. They won't go after the one they need to go after, so they go after the one they can go after.

about three weeks ago
top

Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

sabri Re:But correct != complete and fairly representati (193 comments)

For example, there was an infamous case in the UK a few year ago when a paediatrician -- a doctor who specialises in helping children -- was run out of their home by vigilantes who were too stupid to know the difference between a paediatrician and a paedophile.

So, you're arguing that due to English schtupidity (pronounce as Clarkson), Google should conceal factually correct data from being discovered while it is perfectly visible elsewhere on the web?

in reality the people accessing information on the Internet are only human, and in reality even well-meaning people may come across incorrect or misleading information and make judgements based on it without realising they were in error. That means sometimes it does make sense to conceal information, at least partially or for a limited period of time, in order to protect other humans from unfair harm.

No disagreement there.

I believe everyone has a basic moral right to fair treatment in this respect, particularly because the damage to a wronged individual if that right is violated will be far greater than the damage to someone who just didn't trivially find out about some possibly incorrect allegations.

And this is the part where it becomes interesting. Remember what is happening here. Google is a search engine, an indexer of information that is readily available elsewhere. If the Guardian reports about child-abuse allegations against John Doe, and Mr Doe is acquitted in court, the report about the allegations are still correct. You're arguing that Google should no longer be allowed to produce search results that link to the original allegations. I'm arguing that this is a silly way of handling things. If one would really want to protect the acquitted, the law should mandate that the article be amended with information regarding the acquittal.

Obscuring the fact that the original allegation was made by passing laws against an indexing service smells like Chinese Censorship to me, and I find that to be a dangerous slippery slope.

I also note that the justice systems in almost every civilised country take a similar view, often such that even actual criminal convictions become "spent" after a time and no longer need to be disclosed. It turns out that sometimes people do change and that encouraging the successful rehabilitation of past offenders makes that much more likely than leaving them with some minor infraction hanging over them for the rest of their lives.

Totally agree there. But my point remains valid: in such a case the origin of the information should be affected, not the indexer. And also, most criminal convictions will stay on the record (especially in the case of felonies), but won't be taken into account (or to a lesser extent) when performing a background check. In my former home country (The Netherlands) that usually means 4 years for infractions, 8 years for felonies. The record itself stays and the individual can go to the courthouse to see the rapsheet, but it will not be disclosed to anyone.

I assume that in yours my freedom of movement also extends to the right to enter your home and my freedom of expression extends to the right to spray paint abusive comments all over it?

You have the freedom of movement that extends to the border of my properties. Your freedom of expression extends to the right to say whatever you want. Spray painting is not free speech, that would be infringement on my property rights. I think it was Thomas Jefferson who once said:

The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. But it does me no injury for my neighbour to say there are twenty gods, or no god. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.

about three weeks ago
top

Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

sabri Re:How about (193 comments)

The problem is you can't anymore, without forgetting to use the web in its entirety.

Bullshit. You name me one Google service that you can't live without. Last time I checked, Google Beating Heart or Google Breathing Air were not available yet.

about three weeks ago
top

Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

sabri Re:some sharp knives in that European drawer (193 comments)

The Internet has the bad habit of not forgetting anything, hence laws are necessary to purge incorrect, or out of date information pertaining to people.

There are already existing laws that cover incorrect information. Correct information itself is never out of date. If someone has been charged with a crime, that fact stays, even if s/he was found not guilty. Information on the second world war is out of date as well, shall we just erase that from history?

If the OP shouts communism or socialism it just shows how idiot you really are.

On the contrary, it shows how socialistic nanny-states try to force companies founded in free countries to adhere by their standards. The EU doesn't want American laws to apply to Europe, but they do want EU law to apply to US companies? They can fsck themselves.

about three weeks ago
top

How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

sabri Re:What about long-term data integrity? (438 comments)

You can have mirrored ram. you can have battery backed-up ram.

Yes you can. Now name me one vendor that actually offers that today....

about three weeks ago

Submissions

top

Highly Educated Foreign Workers Treated Like Indentured Servants

sabri sabri writes  |  about 1 month ago

sabri (584428) writes "NBC Bay Area reports about indentured servants in Silicon Valley, primarily H1-B visa holders. NBC Bay Area and CIR’s team discovered an organized system that supplies cheap labor made up of highly-educated and highly-skilled foreign workers who come to the US via H-1B visas.

It virtually makes these employees a slave,” said one worker who came from India more than a decade ago."
top

CHP officers steal, forward nude pictures from arrestee smartphones

sabri sabri writes  |  about 2 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "Following the initial suspension of a CHP officer earlier this week, the news has come out that apparently, the CHP has an entire ring of officers who steal and subsequently share nude pictures. The nudies are stolen from females who are arrested or stopped. Officer Sean Harrington of Martinez reportedly confessed to stealing explicit photos from the suspect’s phone, and said he forwarded those images to at least two other CHP officers..

Where is the ACLU when you need them the most?"
top

CHP officer steals nudies from arrested girl to his own cellphone

sabri sabri writes  |  about 2 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "Apparently your cellphone is not safe in the hands of the CHP. CHP officer Sean Harrington, 35, of Martinez, was caught stealing nudies from the cellphone of a woman he had just arrested.

What did the CHP do? They must have fired the bastard! Nope. They gave him a deskjob: 'The five-year CHP veteran has been assigned to desk duties', the CHP explains."
top

No shortage in tech workers, advocacy groups say

sabri sabri writes  |  about 5 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "To have a labor shortage or not to have, that's the question. According to the San Jose Mercury News:

Last month, three tech advocacy groups launched a labor boycott against Infosys, IBM and the global staffing and consulting company ManpowerGroup, citing a "pattern of excluding U.S. workers from job openings on U.S soil."

They say Manpower, for example, last year posted U.S. job openings in India but not in the United States."
top

City of San Jose wants to snoop private CCTV camera's

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year ago

sabri (584428) writes "The City of San Jose, self-proclaimed capitol of Silicon Valley, wants to snoop into the security camera's of private citizens, in an effort to combat the rising crime figures of the city. The councilman proposing the ordinance says " The new database "is something that costs very little but could have a big impact in making San Jose safer."". Full article available on the website of the San Jose Mercury News website."
top

Woman facing $3500 fine for posting online review

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year ago

sabri (584428) writes "Jen Palmer tried to order something from kleargear.com, some sort of cheap Thinkgeek clone. The merchandise never arrived and she wrote a review on ripoffreport.com. Now, kleargear.com is reporting her to credit agencies and sending collectors to collect $3500 as part of a clause which did not exist at the alleged time of purchase.

Now I'm wondering whether or not the terms and conditions even apply, since the sales transaction was never completed."
top

Second SFO disaster avoided seconds before crash

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year ago

sabri (584428) writes "On July 25th, flight EVA28, a Boeing 777 flying from Taiwan to SFO, was on the final approach for runway 28L when they were alerted by ATC that they were only at 600ft above the ground at less than 4NM from the threshold. SFO's tower directed the flight crew to climb immediately and declare missed approach.

Assuming they were flying at 140 knots (typical approach speed of a 777), they were less than 2 minutes from the runway and at a 3 degree angle (approx 500ft/min descent), about a minute from impact. This is the same type of aircraft and runway used by the crashed Asiana flight. Similar weather conditions and awfully similar flight path. Is there a structural problem with computer-aided pilot's ability to fly visual approaches?"
top

USCIS receives 50,000 packages of H-1B petitions on first day

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year and a half ago

sabri (584428) writes "The USCIS has received 50,000 applications for new H-1B visas on the 1st day of the H-1B season for FY2014. It is expected that this years season will not last longer than the minimum of 5 days.

While the proponents and opponents of the H-1B visa program still disagree, one thing is sure: the increased H-1B visa demand is a sign that the economy is improving."
top

Huawei got caught copying - again

sabri sabri writes  |  about 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "Huawei, the industry leader in copying other companies code and property, has done it again. This time they did not even bother removing their victim's contact information:

"Sabina Berloffa, vice president of marketing at Kapsch CarrierCom, made her views quite clear on her company's website — see Kapsch vs. Huawei: Find the differences — after Huawei issued promotional materials that not only resembled Kapsch's in practically every respect but which also included a hyperlink to Kapsch's contact details."

You'd think they would learn at some point..."

Link to Original Source
top

Security expert: Huawei routers riddles with vulnerabilities

sabri sabri writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "Cnet reports in this article that German security expert Felix Lindner has unearthed several vulnerabilities in Huawei's carrier grade routers. These vulnerabilities could potentially enable attackers, or the Chinese government, to snoop on users' traffic and/or perform a man-in-the-middle attack. While these routers are mostly in use in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, they are increasingly being used in other parts of the world as well, because of their dirt-cheap pricing.

Disclaimer: I work for one of their competitors."

Link to Original Source
top

"Cyber" criminals distribute infected USB sticks on parking lot

sabri sabri writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "The Dutch news-site Elsevier is reporting that cybercriminals attempted to steal data from a multinational by "losing" spyware infected USB sticks on the companies parking lot. Their attempt failed as one of the employees who found the stick dropped it off at the companies IT department, who then found the spyware and issued a warning.

So next time, don't expect to find someones dirty pictures on a USB stick you just found..."

Link to Original Source

Journals

sabri has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?