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Comments

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Nearly 2,000 Chicago Flights Canceled After Worker Sets Fire At Radar Center

sabri Re:Big Goverment no backup (221 comments)

Reroute the data to a cloud service have the PCs remote into virtual workstations and have the radio fed through the same system.

Imagine making the call to your HOA: "do you mind if I install a primary and secondary radar system on the rooftop of the apartment building? Yeah, I need that for work. Ok, thanks, bye"

3 days ago
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How the NSA Profits Off of Its Surveillance Technology

sabri Re:I can't quite decide (82 comments)

Licensing technology developed on the public dime seems like a rather responsible thing to do, just like negotiating for maximum compensation for oil on public land is the smart thing to do.

You're conveniently omitting the fact that oil on the public land has not already been paid by the taxpayer.

In your world, the taxpayer pays twice for procuring the technology. First for the development, then for the licensing.

3 days ago
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How the NSA Profits Off of Its Surveillance Technology

sabri Re:I can't quite decide (82 comments)

The NSA has done a lot of things over the years, most of them

Funded by the taxpayer already.

Now if companies are paying the NSA to get access to their research, they're paying twice: once as a taxpayer, and now as a "customer".

If the technology can be declassified, the information should be public property, as its research was funded by the taxpayer.

3 days ago
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Amazon Forced To Reboot EC2 To Patch Bug In Xen

sabri Re:Compared to Azure (94 comments)

It might be a shitty platform. but you are a shitty programmer.

Apply water to burned area.

4 days ago
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Not Just Netflix: Google Challenges Canada's Power To Regulate Online Video

sabri Re:Broadcast rights (108 comments)

Dithering about whether or not streaming is a form of broadcasting for the purposes of canadian content rules is just splitting hairs

No it is not. When looking a a law, you also have to look at the historic reasoning behind it. Until very recently, broadcasting meant that once you put it on a radiowave or a cable TV system, the broadcaster had very little control on who would receive it. A radio or TV system could receive any content that was broadcast by the sender (hence the term broad-cast).

The laws that were setup under that system, are meant for that system as well. It provides a clear definition on what a broadcaster is, so that the law would not be used for other purposes.

Technological advances have changed the landscape, and if the CRTC (an executive branch of government), wants to broaden its authority to 1-on-1 content rather than 1-on-255.255.255.255 content, it should consult with the people first, in the form of the democratically elected lawmakers.

This is not nitpicking, this is respecting the law as it was written.

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

sabri Re: Read Slashdot (471 comments)

you committed to being a world expert in one particular realm of knowledge

Yes, a theoretical expert. I've worked with PhDs in a hands-on environment. They were completely and utterly useless to get things done.

Great thinkers, and excellent in solving complex theoretical problems. But nothing usable in a hands-on world of coding, linux administration or network configuration.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

sabri Re:Read Slashdot (471 comments)

Also, hide the PhD.

As weird as it may sound, this may help. You write yourself:

get rejected after an overly technical question

Advertising a PhD may come across as advertising that you think you're good. You may not mean it that way, but it will most certainly be received like that. I've performed many technical interviews and when I prepare myself for a candidate, I go over their resume (their ad). If the candidate advertises knowledge of a specific topic, he or she better know it.

The rejections you got may not have been because you didn't know a specific answer to a very technical question. Nobody knows everything. You may have been rejected because of the answer that you gave, and let me explain.

When I interview, I will make sure there is one topic with a couple of questions that I don't expect you to know from the top of your head. I will get online and get the answers if needed. I will ask the question (if we get to it) and see the response. If you get the answer right: well done, you will have my vote. If you don't then this is where the psychology comes in. I'll be looking for you to be honest. Don't make up answers, don't come up with a bullshit reply. If I get bullshit, no matter how good you were, you will fail the interview. If you bullshit me, you'll bullshit a customer, manager or anyone else when you're in the hot seat.

Don't underestimate the importance of attitude and honesty in an interview.

about a week ago
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Netflix Rejects Canadian Regulator Jurisdiction Over Online Video

sabri Re:Funny how this works ... (184 comments)

We're more like european countries with Free School for all, Free Healthcare for all, lots of social services and support for our vulnerable population.

I fled one of those countries. If you'r old enough to know what TANSTAAFL means, this is your classic example. Your "Free" education, "Free" healthcare and the Social Security State are being funded by who? An anonymous philanthropist? No they're not. They're being funded by you, the taxpayer.

Which (in my former home country) was achieved by a 52% income tax and a 21% sales tax. So that's 73% in total, going straight to Mother Russia^H^H^H^H^H^H State, who will make sure it gets spent on Revolutionary things like bailing out Greece, redistributing my hard-earned cash to people who refuse to work, Eastern European thugs coming to pickpocket and pay the master thieves of the EU.

An aspect of this, is the government spending a LOT of money developing artists, book/movie production houses, etc. This conflict between Netflix and the CRTC is tied to that. Other broadcaster have to chip money into the pot for, yes, our socialist approach to fostering local arts. Many Canadians *support* this idea

See, you even agree with me. Basically Canada should be returned to the Russians to be part of the new Soviet Ukrain Canadian Union. American companies are NOT socialist. So get your commie ass back to Russia or stop whining.

about a week ago
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Mark Zuckerberg Throws Pal Joe Green Under the Tech Immigration Bus

sabri Re:Dissolution of the middle class!. YES! (260 comments)

YOU are a member of an elite

No I'm not. I was forced out of San Jose because of the high housing prices. I'm not even going to try Palo Alto, Menlo Park or San Francisco. I'm way south of the Bay. Definitely not elite, even though I'd like to think of myself as someone skilled in network engineering.

you work in an ivory tower with the great unwashed baying at the gate

You could not be further from the truth. I encourage anyone, from the janitor to the security guards, to take an interest in computer science and network engineering. I remind them that I never took any classes that are relevant to my job. If I can do it, they can do it. So can everyone else who is interested. I got to where I am today because I threw Windows 95 from my PC and installed Linux. That led me down a path of systems administrator, network administrator to the JNCIE that I am today. My formal education did nothing whatsoever to get me here. Nothing 31337 about that.

about a week ago
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"Big Bang Signal" Could All Be Dust

sabri Re:funny! [frist post] (133 comments)

Who was the first troll?

The God that created the Big Fart of course...

about a week ago
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Mark Zuckerberg Throws Pal Joe Green Under the Tech Immigration Bus

sabri Re:Dissolution of the middle class! (260 comments)

If you're even remotely presentable and capable of basic human interaction, you cannot not have a job in the Bay area, even if you're completely freaking clueless.

Actually, I kind of have to agree with you here. Yesterday I had a friend over who worked in the same team as I did for a large vendor of telecommunications equipment. For years (at least 5), there was one guy who was completely and utterly useless, did not perform and could not even complete the most basic tasks by himself. I always thought he had some compromising images of his boss or something similar that prevented him from being fired.

Turns out the guy was hired by a startup recently. I thought that would be unimaginable, but then I realized that I was mistaken. He is very well-spoken, has a nice personality and if you don't have to work with him, he is generally a good guy to have a beer with. It's just that he is useless as a tech worker IMHO. Oh, and if you read this: no offense :)

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is iOS 8 a Pig?

sabri Re:Alright smart guy (504 comments)

You think there is something funny about this?

At least he has the cajones to admit his mistakes, with his username, COWARD.

about a week ago
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Mark Zuckerberg Throws Pal Joe Green Under the Tech Immigration Bus

sabri Re:Dissolution of the middle class! (260 comments)

Drive down wages

In the specific case of Facebook, it is not about driving wages down. Facebook pays decent wages, even for Silicon Valley standards. It is about not increasing wages.

What Facebook et al need is a way to ensure that they'll be able to fill their positions without creating too much of a jobseekers market so they won't be forced to lure employees away from the competition. All those sign-on bonuses, recruiter fees and salary increases (usually roughly 10% if you jump ship) will add up quickly.

Truth of the matter is, in the SF Bay Area, it is hard to be unemployed if you're a properly skilled tech worker, citizen, green-card holder or otherwise. That doesn't mean I condone the way that the H1-B program often is being abused today. I've seen abuse, and we'll always see that. But this is only made possible due to the ridiculous limits on permanent resident visas vs the amount of H1-B visas, as I pointed out in this comment.:

There is disconnect between the amount of H1-B visas (which are not limited per country) and amount of greencards (which are limited per country). We all know which country I'm talking about: the folks from India, however you may feel about their presence, are hitting this the most: For each EB category (EB1, EB2, EB3 in general), there are 265 greencards available per month. That's a little over 9500 per year. On the other side is the number of H1-B (and L-1) visa that get allocated to workers chargeable to India. Just for H1-B, that number comes close to 170,000 just for FY2012 (source [uscis.gov]). Then there are the L1 visa holders, which are uncapped.

So, you end up having ~10k greencards, vs ~200k influx, just for India alone. This means that there is a huge waiting list for people with approved I-140s, but not eligible to file for AOS. What are you going to do with them? Sent them back? Politics chose to let them stay by renewing their H1-B every 1 to 3 years, even after the 6th year.

about a week ago
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Next Android To Enable Local Encryption By Default Too, Says Google

sabri Re:If you believe this (126 comments)

I know everybody talks about encryption, but the word itself is just the tip of security.

Rknpgyl gung. "Rapelcgrq" qbrf abg nyjnlf zrna "Frpherq".

about two weeks ago
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NASA's Manned Rocket Contract: $4.2 Billion To Boeing, $2.6 Billion To SpaceX

sabri Re:I hate to be this guy... (188 comments)

Space "exploration", such as it is, is a hobby.

Space exploration may prove the only way for our species to survive an ELE.

about two weeks ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

sabri Re:Most taxes are legalized theft (324 comments)

It's "without permission" and "the right" part (among other things) that makes taxation and theft two different things.

See, this is the interesting part. I think we'll both agree that the permission part depends on me giving permission, so we won't need to discuss that. The next part is more difficult.

I have a two year old. We're weaning her off the pacifier, but occasionally, she manages to slip into her bedroom and finds a pacifier. When we ask her who gave her the pacifier, the reply is "I gave it to myself!".

The government is doing the same thing. It's the government that grants itself permission to take away my property. Putin gave himself permission to enter Ukraine.

In my first year of law school, I learned that legal scholars define something they call a "social contract", which says that in a civilized society, everyone has a contract with each other to "do the right thing". So again, I'm not debating whether or not we should pay taxes. I'm simply saying that the way things are going today, are open for improvement (to be very British).

about two weeks ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

sabri Re:Most taxes are legalized theft (324 comments)

Taxation is not theft.

Well, the dictionary disagrees with your:

to take (the property of another or others) without permission or right, especially secretly or by force

The government is taking my property without my permission, and it gives itself the right to do so. The government partially does it secretly, and if I don't comply I will go to jail.

But you took my words out of context. I am talking about "general forms of tax". For example income tax, sales tax and all taxes that have no specific purpose. Buy an airline ticket? You pay security tax. Fine, fair and square. I choose to buy an airplane ticket and the government has to provide security, ATC etc. So I pay taxes for it. But why the F should I pay income taxes to the government can bail out "Too big to fail" crooks?

I am not opposed to paying taxes in general, I'm just opposed to that "we're taking your money and put it in our wallet, and we'll see later what we'll do with it. But trust us, it's in your interest" crap. You want my money, I want to see (and preferably have a voice as to) what you're doing with it.

about two weeks ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

sabri Most taxes are legalized theft (324 comments)

General forms of taxes are legalized theft anyway. When the government just takes money away for their "general bucket", it is nothing more than stealing.

Instead, tax-per-use: road tax, school tax, environmental tax, so the tax-payer knows what happens to their money.

If governments would be more transparent, less people would have problems paying taxes.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T Proposes Net Neutrality Compromise

sabri Re:You mean... (241 comments)

Out of mod points when I need them the most. Mod parent up.

about two weeks ago
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Browser To Facilitate Text Browsing In Emergencies

sabri Re:They want to ensure the SMS network is overload (40 comments)

When disaster comes, what else is going to work anyway?

I have my handheld aviation radio. Tune in to 121.5 and someone is going to listen. I also have CB radio as a backup. Plus of course, said AM radio (but most people will have AM, even if they don't know it: just get into your car).

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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No shortage in tech workers, advocacy groups say

sabri sabri writes  |  about 3 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "To have a labor shortage or not to have, that's the question. According to the San Jose Mercury News:

Last month, three tech advocacy groups launched a labor boycott against Infosys, IBM and the global staffing and consulting company ManpowerGroup, citing a "pattern of excluding U.S. workers from job openings on U.S soil."

They say Manpower, for example, last year posted U.S. job openings in India but not in the United States."
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City of San Jose wants to snoop private CCTV camera's

sabri sabri writes  |  about 8 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "The City of San Jose, self-proclaimed capitol of Silicon Valley, wants to snoop into the security camera's of private citizens, in an effort to combat the rising crime figures of the city. The councilman proposing the ordinance says " The new database "is something that costs very little but could have a big impact in making San Jose safer."". Full article available on the website of the San Jose Mercury News website."
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Woman facing $3500 fine for posting online review

sabri sabri writes  |  about 10 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "Jen Palmer tried to order something from kleargear.com, some sort of cheap Thinkgeek clone. The merchandise never arrived and she wrote a review on ripoffreport.com. Now, kleargear.com is reporting her to credit agencies and sending collectors to collect $3500 as part of a clause which did not exist at the alleged time of purchase.

Now I'm wondering whether or not the terms and conditions even apply, since the sales transaction was never completed."
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Second SFO disaster avoided seconds before crash

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year ago

sabri (584428) writes "On July 25th, flight EVA28, a Boeing 777 flying from Taiwan to SFO, was on the final approach for runway 28L when they were alerted by ATC that they were only at 600ft above the ground at less than 4NM from the threshold. SFO's tower directed the flight crew to climb immediately and declare missed approach.

Assuming they were flying at 140 knots (typical approach speed of a 777), they were less than 2 minutes from the runway and at a 3 degree angle (approx 500ft/min descent), about a minute from impact. This is the same type of aircraft and runway used by the crashed Asiana flight. Similar weather conditions and awfully similar flight path. Is there a structural problem with computer-aided pilot's ability to fly visual approaches?"
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USCIS receives 50,000 packages of H-1B petitions on first day

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year and a half ago

sabri (584428) writes "The USCIS has received 50,000 applications for new H-1B visas on the 1st day of the H-1B season for FY2014. It is expected that this years season will not last longer than the minimum of 5 days.

While the proponents and opponents of the H-1B visa program still disagree, one thing is sure: the increased H-1B visa demand is a sign that the economy is improving."
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Huawei got caught copying - again

sabri sabri writes  |  about 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "Huawei, the industry leader in copying other companies code and property, has done it again. This time they did not even bother removing their victim's contact information:

"Sabina Berloffa, vice president of marketing at Kapsch CarrierCom, made her views quite clear on her company's website — see Kapsch vs. Huawei: Find the differences — after Huawei issued promotional materials that not only resembled Kapsch's in practically every respect but which also included a hyperlink to Kapsch's contact details."

You'd think they would learn at some point..."

Link to Original Source
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Security expert: Huawei routers riddles with vulnerabilities

sabri sabri writes  |  about 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "Cnet reports in this article that German security expert Felix Lindner has unearthed several vulnerabilities in Huawei's carrier grade routers. These vulnerabilities could potentially enable attackers, or the Chinese government, to snoop on users' traffic and/or perform a man-in-the-middle attack. While these routers are mostly in use in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, they are increasingly being used in other parts of the world as well, because of their dirt-cheap pricing.

Disclaimer: I work for one of their competitors."

Link to Original Source
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"Cyber" criminals distribute infected USB sticks on parking lot

sabri sabri writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "The Dutch news-site Elsevier is reporting that cybercriminals attempted to steal data from a multinational by "losing" spyware infected USB sticks on the companies parking lot. Their attempt failed as one of the employees who found the stick dropped it off at the companies IT department, who then found the spyware and issued a warning.

So next time, don't expect to find someones dirty pictures on a USB stick you just found..."

Link to Original Source

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