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Comments

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Next Android To Enable Local Encryption By Default Too, Says Google

sabri Re:If you believe this (124 comments)

I know everybody talks about encryption, but the word itself is just the tip of security.

Rknpgyl gung. "Rapelcgrq" qbrf abg nyjnlf zrna "Frpherq".

yesterday
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NASA's Manned Rocket Contract: $4.2 Billion To Boeing, $2.6 Billion To SpaceX

sabri Re:I hate to be this guy... (185 comments)

Space "exploration", such as it is, is a hobby.

Space exploration may prove the only way for our species to survive an ELE.

2 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

sabri Re:Most taxes are legalized theft (319 comments)

It's "without permission" and "the right" part (among other things) that makes taxation and theft two different things.

See, this is the interesting part. I think we'll both agree that the permission part depends on me giving permission, so we won't need to discuss that. The next part is more difficult.

I have a two year old. We're weaning her off the pacifier, but occasionally, she manages to slip into her bedroom and finds a pacifier. When we ask her who gave her the pacifier, the reply is "I gave it to myself!".

The government is doing the same thing. It's the government that grants itself permission to take away my property. Putin gave himself permission to enter Ukraine.

In my first year of law school, I learned that legal scholars define something they call a "social contract", which says that in a civilized society, everyone has a contract with each other to "do the right thing". So again, I'm not debating whether or not we should pay taxes. I'm simply saying that the way things are going today, are open for improvement (to be very British).

2 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

sabri Re:Most taxes are legalized theft (319 comments)

Taxation is not theft.

Well, the dictionary disagrees with your:

to take (the property of another or others) without permission or right, especially secretly or by force

The government is taking my property without my permission, and it gives itself the right to do so. The government partially does it secretly, and if I don't comply I will go to jail.

But you took my words out of context. I am talking about "general forms of tax". For example income tax, sales tax and all taxes that have no specific purpose. Buy an airline ticket? You pay security tax. Fine, fair and square. I choose to buy an airplane ticket and the government has to provide security, ATC etc. So I pay taxes for it. But why the F should I pay income taxes to the government can bail out "Too big to fail" crooks?

I am not opposed to paying taxes in general, I'm just opposed to that "we're taking your money and put it in our wallet, and we'll see later what we'll do with it. But trust us, it's in your interest" crap. You want my money, I want to see (and preferably have a voice as to) what you're doing with it.

2 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

sabri Most taxes are legalized theft (319 comments)

General forms of taxes are legalized theft anyway. When the government just takes money away for their "general bucket", it is nothing more than stealing.

Instead, tax-per-use: road tax, school tax, environmental tax, so the tax-payer knows what happens to their money.

If governments would be more transparent, less people would have problems paying taxes.

3 days ago
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AT&T Proposes Net Neutrality Compromise

sabri Re:You mean... (236 comments)

Out of mod points when I need them the most. Mod parent up.

3 days ago
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Browser To Facilitate Text Browsing In Emergencies

sabri Re:They want to ensure the SMS network is overload (40 comments)

When disaster comes, what else is going to work anyway?

I have my handheld aviation radio. Tune in to 121.5 and someone is going to listen. I also have CB radio as a backup. Plus of course, said AM radio (but most people will have AM, even if they don't know it: just get into your car).

3 days ago
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New Details About NSA's Exhaustive Search of Edward Snowden's Emails

sabri Re:Again? (200 comments)

"At least the NSA can be voted out of office." Explain how.

Congress funds the NSA. All you need to do is vote for representatives that will cut the funding.

4 days ago
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New Details About NSA's Exhaustive Search of Edward Snowden's Emails

sabri Re:Again? (200 comments)

Who are you going to believe, Snowden or the NSA? Keep in mind that one has been caught red handed lying to Congress and the media over and over and over again.

While the other violated his NDAs and is now wanted for treason.

At least the NSA can be voted out of office.

4 days ago
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Why Atheists Need Captain Kirk

sabri Re:illogical captain (900 comments)

the main difference is that people in your group tend to tell other people what to do, and atheists tend not to tell people what to do.

I guess this hits the nail with the hammer

In the end, religion is like having a penis. It's ok to have one, and it's ok to be proud of it. But if you're going to take it out and attempt to shove it down my throat, we are going to have a bit of a problem.

5 days ago
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CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

sabri Re:I am shocked, SHOCKED, to find gambling here... (462 comments)

My great-grandma was a remarkable woman, practical, restrained & wise. Same can't be said for most of the occupants of the Oval Office for the past 40 years.

The difference is that the occupants of the Oval Office were elected, and could be thrown out every 4 years. Same can't be said for the great-grandma that rules Great Britain.

5 days ago
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SanDisk Releases 512GB SD Card

sabri Re:Fahrenheit? WTHolyF? (210 comments)

Celsius is arbitrary too.

In metric, one millileter of water occupies one cubic centimeter, weighs one gram, and requires one calorie of energy to heat up by one degree celcius - which is exactly one percent of the difference between its freezing point and its boiling point.

In the American system, the answer to "How much energy does it take to boil a room-temperature gallon of water?" is "Go fuck yourself", because the American arbitrary roller-coaster makes it impossible directly relate any of those quantities.

about a week ago
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SanDisk Releases 512GB SD Card

sabri Re:Fahrenheit? WTHolyF? (210 comments)

Why the hell are we talking about the Fahrenheit scale.

Because the marketing droids who came up with the press release are based in the U.S., the only country next to Birma to use this arbitrary roller-coaster as an official standard.

about a week ago
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CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

sabri Re:I am shocked, SHOCKED, to find gambling here... (462 comments)

nless you are a Brazilian plumber.

Mod parent up.

When comparing the US with the UK, I'd choose the US within a second. At least the US isn't ruled by a great-grandma.

about a week ago
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Researcher Fired At NSF After Government Questions Her Role As 1980s Activist

sabri Re:Wrong Title (499 comments)

Considering they're responsible for nearly 100,000 deaths per year from flooding the streets with guns, no one owes you any damn examples.

So in your reasoning, anyone associated with the Taxed Enough Already group, is guilty of "violently attempting to overthrow the government" because some of their affiliated politicians are attempting to protect their interpretation of the second amendment through non-violent means such as the court system and congress?

You, sir, are a genuine idiot.

And although I'm very much pro gun control, I do feel that it is people who kill people, not guns. Guns don't pull their own trigger. If you want someone dead, you can choose a lot more methods other than guns. The only reasons I'm pro gun control is that with so much weapons on the street, impulse murders are way higher than they should be, and the chances of innocent kids finding weapons and killing themselves are way too high.

about a week ago
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NYPD Starts Body Camera Pilot Program

sabri Re:$10,000 per camera (170 comments)

I wonder if I wear a number of HIGH powered IR LED's on my hat/person, if that would blind out these officer cameras?

You mean like this?

This German exibition is showcasing bright infrared LED devices that overwhelm the CCDs in security cameras, allowing you to move through modern society in relative privacy. I used this as a gimmick in my story I, Robot -- now I want to own one!

about two weeks ago
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How Big Telecom Smothers Municipal Broadband

sabri Re:This Just In! (111 comments)

Because you can't have the government competing with them in an area that they might, someday, begin to consider serving.

There is only one reason for the government to step in: make it easier for smaller ISPs to start shop. I'd love to start a small ISP in my area, but it is practically impossible.

about three weeks ago
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California Passes Law Mandating Smartphone Kill Switch

sabri Re: The worrisome part (233 comments)

So fuck you California. It's one thing if you dumb liberals infect your own state. It's another if you have a chilling effect on the entire US (and perhaps even around the world).

Nobody forces cellphone vendors to manufacture phones for the California market. They are free to sell their phones elsewhere. Only the future will tell whether or not vendors will comply with the state law or just choose to sell their phones elsewhere.

One example of this would be California's CARB compliance crap. When I bought a generator a few years ago (are you ready for an earthquake?), I found out that it isn't that simple to just go on Amazon and get one. Noooo, you need one that is specifically made for the California market because some idiot in the air board decided to create additional rules, just for CA.

Secretly I hope that the next Iphone won't have the killswitch and won't be sold in California. Let's see how long the treehuggers are still in control of this State after that.

about three weeks ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

sabri Re:My opinion on the matter. (826 comments)

MS got its market dominance by making a deal with IBM, not by creating a great product. Apple got its market dominance by cultivating an image, not by creating a great product.

...which is a completely irrelevant way to measure quality of the market.

The carriers (read: AT&T, Verizon, Comcast etc) who use carrier grade equipment don't care about market dominance by deals or market dominance by image. They care about what works. Routers are not consumer products.

about three weeks ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

sabri Re:My opinion on the matter. (826 comments)

I've been doing Linux admin in some fashion or another for 20+ years, so in many ways I'm part of the "old guard".

I guess we're part of a similar generation, although I have about 5 years less (started in 1997 with Linux).

The argument about small being better, making programs that do one thing well, etc is a good design element that's worked for years.

This is exactly what I'm talking about. Yes, it has worked for years, and that's why you like it. You (we?) are now that "old generation" that I was referring to, and I'm not about to become a grumpy old admin.

Let me give you another example, which is geared a bit more towards my current profession. In the last couple of years, I worked for two large vendors of networking equipment. Vendor R used your way of doing things: each network protocol has its own daemon. So you end up having ospfd, isisd, bgpd etc. Worked just fine. I also worked for vendor J, who used one big binary: rpd handles just about every routing protocol you can imagine. Is J bad and is R good? According to the market, J is doing very well, while R has been acquired and assimilated by a another company.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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No shortage in tech workers, advocacy groups say

sabri sabri writes  |  about 2 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "To have a labor shortage or not to have, that's the question. According to the San Jose Mercury News:

Last month, three tech advocacy groups launched a labor boycott against Infosys, IBM and the global staffing and consulting company ManpowerGroup, citing a "pattern of excluding U.S. workers from job openings on U.S soil."

They say Manpower, for example, last year posted U.S. job openings in India but not in the United States."
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City of San Jose wants to snoop private CCTV camera's

sabri sabri writes  |  about 8 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "The City of San Jose, self-proclaimed capitol of Silicon Valley, wants to snoop into the security camera's of private citizens, in an effort to combat the rising crime figures of the city. The councilman proposing the ordinance says " The new database "is something that costs very little but could have a big impact in making San Jose safer."". Full article available on the website of the San Jose Mercury News website."
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Woman facing $3500 fine for posting online review

sabri sabri writes  |  about 10 months ago

sabri (584428) writes "Jen Palmer tried to order something from kleargear.com, some sort of cheap Thinkgeek clone. The merchandise never arrived and she wrote a review on ripoffreport.com. Now, kleargear.com is reporting her to credit agencies and sending collectors to collect $3500 as part of a clause which did not exist at the alleged time of purchase.

Now I'm wondering whether or not the terms and conditions even apply, since the sales transaction was never completed."
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Second SFO disaster avoided seconds before crash

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year ago

sabri (584428) writes "On July 25th, flight EVA28, a Boeing 777 flying from Taiwan to SFO, was on the final approach for runway 28L when they were alerted by ATC that they were only at 600ft above the ground at less than 4NM from the threshold. SFO's tower directed the flight crew to climb immediately and declare missed approach.

Assuming they were flying at 140 knots (typical approach speed of a 777), they were less than 2 minutes from the runway and at a 3 degree angle (approx 500ft/min descent), about a minute from impact. This is the same type of aircraft and runway used by the crashed Asiana flight. Similar weather conditions and awfully similar flight path. Is there a structural problem with computer-aided pilot's ability to fly visual approaches?"
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USCIS receives 50,000 packages of H-1B petitions on first day

sabri sabri writes  |  about a year and a half ago

sabri (584428) writes "The USCIS has received 50,000 applications for new H-1B visas on the 1st day of the H-1B season for FY2014. It is expected that this years season will not last longer than the minimum of 5 days.

While the proponents and opponents of the H-1B visa program still disagree, one thing is sure: the increased H-1B visa demand is a sign that the economy is improving."
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Huawei got caught copying - again

sabri sabri writes  |  about 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "Huawei, the industry leader in copying other companies code and property, has done it again. This time they did not even bother removing their victim's contact information:

"Sabina Berloffa, vice president of marketing at Kapsch CarrierCom, made her views quite clear on her company's website — see Kapsch vs. Huawei: Find the differences — after Huawei issued promotional materials that not only resembled Kapsch's in practically every respect but which also included a hyperlink to Kapsch's contact details."

You'd think they would learn at some point..."

Link to Original Source
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Security expert: Huawei routers riddles with vulnerabilities

sabri sabri writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "Cnet reports in this article that German security expert Felix Lindner has unearthed several vulnerabilities in Huawei's carrier grade routers. These vulnerabilities could potentially enable attackers, or the Chinese government, to snoop on users' traffic and/or perform a man-in-the-middle attack. While these routers are mostly in use in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, they are increasingly being used in other parts of the world as well, because of their dirt-cheap pricing.

Disclaimer: I work for one of their competitors."

Link to Original Source
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"Cyber" criminals distribute infected USB sticks on parking lot

sabri sabri writes  |  more than 2 years ago

sabri (584428) writes "The Dutch news-site Elsevier is reporting that cybercriminals attempted to steal data from a multinational by "losing" spyware infected USB sticks on the companies parking lot. Their attempt failed as one of the employees who found the stick dropped it off at the companies IT department, who then found the spyware and issued a warning.

So next time, don't expect to find someones dirty pictures on a USB stick you just found..."

Link to Original Source

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