Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Iran Arrests Alleged Spies Over Stuxnet Worm

san Re:They don't say who they think it is (261 comments)

No, they didn't break the treaty. Iran is only required by the NPT to inform the IAEA 6 months before such a site goes operational. Iran insists that no nuclear enrichment had yet taken place at Qom. Despite being caught red-handed by the US for having the plant, once Iran publicly confirmed its existence they informed the IAEA that they would soon be enriching from there in the future. Like I said, they broke their word, not the treaty.

Sure, but accepting that reasoning would mean accepting Iran's own definition of whether or not they're breaking the NPT.

I wasn't going for moral relativism, I was faulting the people who keep spouting that "Iran is irrational" because of religion. It isn't, and there are other parties more apocalypticly-minded than Iran is.

True, the danger in Iran isn't millenarianism. It's the fact that the people who are leading the various factions won't have anything to lose once they feel their power (and by extension their very lives) is at stake.

more than 3 years ago
top

Iran Arrests Alleged Spies Over Stuxnet Worm

san Re:They don't say who they think it is (261 comments)

So far they haven't broken the treaty. Have they broken their word? Yes, by building the Qom facility when they told the IAEA they would announce any new developments.

By building a nuclear facility in secret they have broken the treaty. That's what the sanctions are about.

 

Iran is not stupid and not that crazy; they are rational and pragmatic.

The regime appears to be locked in a power struggle between the 'regular government' (for lack of a better term) and the Revolutionary Guard. Last week's on the media has a good analysis on how Iran has now become a dangerous place even for those who vocally support its policies because of this. Regimes that feel threatened in their existence are generally not known for the rationality of their actions.

Christian Zionists they do not believe they can "speed the coming of the apocalypse" by their actions

I'm not quite sure what you mean, but at best it smells of moral relativism stemming from a laziness to think or to get informed (I'm sure there's a term for that).

more than 3 years ago
top

Iran Arrests Alleged Spies Over Stuxnet Worm

san Re:They don't say who they think it is (261 comments)

I guess they're staying in the NPT so that their facility in Bushehr can be legitimately maintained by Russia. What Russia gains from this isn't very clear to me, though.

more than 3 years ago
top

Iran Arrests Alleged Spies Over Stuxnet Worm

san Re:They don't say who they think it is (261 comments)

Iran is a ratified signatory to the Nuclear Non-Profileration Treaty, so: they certainly don't have the right to develop nuclear weapons or even nuclear facilities except with IAEA oversight. Iran's nuclear activity is pretty clearly in contravention of this (they built a nuclear facility in secret near Qom, for example), and there are now several UN sanctions in force against Iran because of this.

Is it 'Western hubris' to demand that a country abide by treaties it ratified? Especially a treaty on a matter as important as nuclear armament...

The reason the West is so hostile to the possibility of a nuclear Iran is that the only peaceful doctrine nuclear weapons allow, MAD, assumes rational actors on all sides. In Iran that rationality might well be subservient to theology.

more than 3 years ago
top

Selling Incandescent Light Bulbs As Heating Devices

san Re:So? (557 comments)

It heats the coolants at the power station. But maybe your power station uses that heat to heat cities, like in some cold places in Europe.

about 4 years ago
top

Tilera To Release 100-Core Processor

san Re:This is great ! (191 comments)

Take a look at /sys/devices/system/cpu: it has information about cpu topology, cpu hot-swap, cache sizes and layout across cores, current power state, etc.

It's all there, in an architecture-independent way in /sys/devices.

more than 4 years ago
top

Slow Oracle Merger Leads To Outflow of Sun Projects, Coders

san Re:European Commission SUCKS (409 comments)

They don't have any obligations outside the US whatsoever, of course. Until they want to do business in the biggest economy of the world. Then they have to play by their rules.

I really don't understand how this is so hard to fathom - the biggest market in the world is not something a business like Oracle can ignore, even if they share your misguided xenophobia.

BTW, movie industries sell regionally because they can make more that way, not less.

about 5 years ago
top

Dirty Coding Tricks To Make a Deadline

san Re:complex finance math (683 comments)

You don't seem to understand the difference between financial modeling and financial transactions.

Apparently your dumb ignorant ass missed the part where square roots of dollar amounts were taken, which clearly points towards some kind of random walk diffusional modeling which has nothing to do with financial transactions and pennies.

If you would have been really clever, you would have noted that what he wanted (complex values for dollars) is mathematically the same as asking for imaginary negative time. The GGP should have been talking about logarithmic dollars to begin with to just avoid this whole issue. It's the only quantity where such quantities make sense.

You're completely right, though, in asserting that distributed computing clients don't need numerical accuracy per se. Getting an estimate of the size of phase space is often more than enough - it's what makes simulation different from single-point energy evaluations, it's exactly what makes CPU time useful for scientific applications.

I'd still advise anybody against working with you, or for you, for the sole reason that the pedantry you're bringing forward in your arguments would seem to make you a very poor manager of actual people. There's an aggression there that is simply not professional.

more than 5 years ago
top

Dirty Coding Tricks To Make a Deadline

san Re:complex finance math (683 comments)

If you're running one of the most popular distributed computing clients out there, you're actually running some of my floating point work, mr. Troll.

If you'd looked at GPs post it'd be obvious that he's talking about taking square roots of dollar amounts, which no financial transaction software should ever do, so doubles are perfectly appropriate here, and probably overkill.

more than 5 years ago
top

Dirty Coding Tricks To Make a Deadline

san Re:complex finance math (683 comments)

That'll be a problem if you ever have to handle extremally large transactions. Doubles round. Finance guys really hate it when their cents go missing.

Note that he's using doubles. 'Extremely large' here would be bigger than $10^15. If he's in Zimbabwe, or his company has transactions two orders of magnitude bigger than the GDP of the EU, there may be a few dollars lost in rounding. But anything less than that should be safe.

more than 5 years ago
top

Appeals Court Overturns 2007 Unix Copyright Decision

san Re:Groklaw coverage (330 comments)

Hardly. Considering SCO still owes Novell, and that this ruling only overturns a summary judgement, doesn't make Novell's copyright claim much weaker.

This case is not about end-users, but about whether SCO even has standing to begin to sue Linux end-users. Which it doesn't (the nature of their copyright deal with Novell was pretty clear, but apparently not enough for a summary judgement).

In the very unlikely event that SCO wins this case, big end-users like IBM may again have to begin to worry about defending against SCO's bizarre claims.

Until then, this case has about as much impact on Linux users as one of the many claims against Apple, Microsoft or Sun have on their respective products' end users.

more than 5 years ago
top

AMD's Phenom II 965, 3.4GHz, 140 Watts, $245

san Re:This is midrange? (273 comments)

That's true, and it will make a big difference for some applications, but once the problem set fits in cache (and for many applications it already does) you won't get any faster.

The truly interesting thing, though, is that CPUs will look more like GPUs when there's many of them. My prediction would be that the distinction between cores will get fuzzier and CPUs and GPUs will be integrated into devices that can reconfigure themselves into a massive number of very simple cores (like a GPU), or a smaller number of superscalar traditional CPU cores.

The relative complexity of instruction decoding will get smaller and smaller as the number of transistors increases, so reconfiguring CPUs like that will get cheaper and cheaper.

more than 5 years ago
top

AMD's Phenom II 965, 3.4GHz, 140 Watts, $245

san Re:This is midrange? (273 comments)

Multicore CPUs are more about what CPU designers can deliver than about what people can actually use.

Because the limiting factors in single-cpu performance have been memory latency and instruction-level parallelism for the last half decade, there has been very little progress in single-core cpu performance over that period of time.

Both these problems won't find a solution any time soon, so don't expect the cores of your 64-core CPU of 2015 to be much faster than the cores of today.

more than 5 years ago
top

iPhone Vulnerability Yields Root Access Via SMS

san Re:easy to stop on att just have them block txt. (186 comments)

True: calling a lot isn't too expensive in the US: it's calling a little that's (relatively) expensive. The last time I checked the cheapest plans were around $30 a month.

In Europe I've had plans for about $15 a month that allow me to call for about 250 minutes (counted in seconds, so a 15 second call is counted as a quarter minute) in the country, or more than an hour to anywhere in Europe or North America. AFAIK There's nothing comparable in the US.

more than 5 years ago
top

iPhone Vulnerability Yields Root Access Via SMS

san Re:easy to stop on att just have them block txt. (186 comments)

I thought it sucked too, in the beginning, but the upside is the cell phone has a normal telephone number with a real area code.

Calling somebody on a cell phone costs the same as calling somebody on a land line, so the cell phone carriers can't do the scam they're pulling off in Europe, where calling a cell phone in a different country is an order of magnitude more expensive than calling a landline in that same country.

I was happy to pay to receive calls because of that (the per-minute rate is pretty low).

more than 5 years ago
top

Researcher Resurrects the First Computer

san Re:Random Numbers on the Manchester Mark 1? (149 comments)

The point still stands; 10^26 unknown variables are really not to be argued with, and as a century of physics has shown us, are nothing to be afraid of~.

Your premise -- the one about about enough knowledge leading to a deterministic outcome of any system -- is inherently so impractical that it is unworkable: there is no system we know of that is so completely cut off from the rest of the universe that we know it to be isolated and describable completely without influence of the outside world's microstate - i.e. we need the rest of the universe's microstate to deterministically predict its path in phase space: something that no computer smaller than the universe itself is able to describe. This is true in the 'macro' world (a coin toss is straddling that border you artificially erected) as it is in the 'micro' world.

That is 20th century physics in a nutshell for you, and it's time to embrace it~.

BTW We certainly do know enough about quantum physics to rule out the 'hidden variables' model you seem to be proposing; look up the Alain Aspect experiments if you will.

and, PS you're right about computers generating pseudo-random numbers: most algorithms that use random numbers have such voracious apetites for them that generating them efficiently becomes an issue, and the only way to do that is through fairly simple algorithms (algorithms being the key word here) that are inherently pseudo-random: there's simply no time to wait for thermal/quantum noise to make its way up the observable orders of magnitude.

Now, if you'll excuse me, it's friday night and I just had a lovely bottle of wine; good night.

more than 5 years ago
top

Watching the IPRED Watchers In Sweden

san Re:127.0.0.1 (88 comments)

So in effect the situation in Sweden is now like in the US, then?
The people sued by the RIAA must have had their identities revealed to the RIAA by the ISP, right?

more than 5 years ago
top

How To Handle Corporate Blackmail?

san Re:contractor position? (675 comments)

The mandatory part - the most expensive part for most people, though may be cheaper for you if you have the right zip code - is what people usually mean when they say 'car insurance' - and the reason it's mandatory is that most people don't have the means to pay the amount of damage they can potentially inflict with their cars; that's when insurance makes sense.

Besides, the hospital figures you're quoting seem very low; from my experience, in the US, a 3 hour emergency room visit - with no operation - will quickly run you in the $20k range. If you have to return for an operation, be prepared to multiply that. How else do you imagine healthcare spending is almost $8000/year per person in the US?

Interestingly, people not getting health insurance is one of the main reasons why getting insurance is so expensive in the first place: if you're healthy and willing/forced to gamble, there's a strong incentive not to insure yourself. This makes it more expensive to get insurance, forcing more people out of insurance.

Together with the complete bureaucratic nightmare that comes with the many types of insurance on offer - and the unwillingness to pay of the insurers (forcing even primary care physicians to hire people to just do the billing), makes the US system the most expensive by far for most people.

more than 5 years ago
top

How To Handle Corporate Blackmail?

san Re:contractor position? (675 comments)

I'm not sure what world you live in, but here in the real world car insurance is not for your car, but for the damage you inflict on others. That insurance is there to keep you from spending the rest of your life paying off that debt you incurred because you hit a bicyclist and caused permanent injury.

The same goes for health insurance: if you hit a tree tomorrow with your car, break a few bones and rupture your kidney, you could very easily be looking at a 6-figure hospital bill.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

san hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

san has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?