Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Ebola Does Not Require an "Ebola Czar," Nor Calling Up the National Guard

schwit1 Let's start by closing the front door (189 comments)

It would go a long way if the US refused direct commercial flights to and from the countries with outbreaks, and refused entry to anyone that has been in one of those countries in the past 3 weeks. The exception would be for US citizens and they should go through quarantine.

5 hours ago
top

Speed Cameras In Chicago Earn $50M Less Than Expected

schwit1 Chicago caught red handed gaming the system (361 comments)

http://www.chicagotribune.com/...

Thousands of Chicago drivers have been tagged with $100 red light fines they did not deserve, targeted by robotic cameras during a series of sudden spikes in tickets that city officials say they cannot explain, a Tribune investigation has found.

The Tribune's analysis of more than 4 million tickets issued since 2007 and a deeper probe of individual cases revealed clear evidence that the deviations in Chicago's network of 380 cameras were caused by faulty equipment, human tinkering or both.

13 hours ago
top

The Executive Order That Redefines Data Collection

schwit1 I'm surprised it took so long (126 comments)

Abuse of words has been the great instrument of sophistry and chicanery, of party, faction, and division of society.

- John Adams

about three weeks ago
top

To Fight $5.2B In Identity Theft, IRS May Need To Change the Way You File Taxes

schwit1 Re:Corporate taxes (410 comments)

regression is easily fixable.

Determine what the average sales tax a person at the poverty line would pay in a month and have the government send a check every month to every citizen for that amount - 5%. The minus 5% is because everyone should pay some taxes.

Warren Buffet gets a check for the same amount as the poorest person in Detroit.

about a month ago
top

To fight $5.2B in identity theft IRS may need to change the way you file taxes

schwit1 $5.2B is low. (2 comments)

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/ir...

In 2012, the Department of Treasury's inspector general predicted that by 2016, IRS will be hemorrhaging, and losing $21 billion due to this type of fraud.

about a month ago
top

Secret Service Critics Pounce After White House Breach

schwit1 Re:God Damn It Shoot the Fools (221 comments)

Getting your name above the fold would hardly be a deterrent.

about 1 month ago
top

Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police

schwit1 LEOs will get Congress to force a back door (4 comments)

I expect the LE community will get Congress to mandate a CALEA type solution for all handsets sold in the US.

about a month ago
top

[Big Bad] Yahoo Takes on The Big Bad Government

schwit1 Lavabit was private, Yahoo is not (1 comments)

If Yahoo execs tried to do a Lavabit they would have been ousted and probably criminally charged.

about a month ago
top

New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

schwit1 Re:Most taxes are legalized theft (324 comments)

... in any way that gets them reelected.

A bit closer to reality.

about a month ago
top

Golfer wins space trip after bagging hole-in-one

schwit1 A real space flight? (1 comments)

altitude > 100km.

about a month ago
top

U.S. Senator: All Cops Should Wear Cameras

schwit1 Can we stop using the word 'TAPE' (643 comments)

It's 2014 and nobody uses tape to record. Recorded data should be sent to a remote data store that the defendants, PD and DA have read only access to.

about 2 months ago
top

U.S. Senator: All Cops Should Wear Cameras

schwit1 Re:One rule (643 comments)

I agree, but let's start with the IRS on this one. The feds have had data retention rules in place for many years but if the DA refuses to prosecute the guilty it's a toothless rule.

about 2 months ago
top

The Flight of Gifted Engineers From NASA

schwit1 Another sign NASA is circling the drain ... (160 comments)

NASA headquarters staff votes to unionize.
http://www.ifpte.org/news/deta...

Anyone with the slightest objectivity knows that the working conditions for federal employees in Washington is glorious, with pay about double what everyone else in the country makes and benefits far exceeding even the best private packages. In addition, the hours are great and just slightly longer than what my generation would have called bankers’ hours. Moreover, if I can be blunt, these engineers are mostly paper pushers. They are not the one’s designing and building anything that might fly in space. Their only reason to unionize now is because they see a threat to their cushy jobs with the advent of private space and are organizing to secure their unneeded positions.

about 2 months ago
top

Judge: US Search Warrants Apply To Overseas Computers

schwit1 What if Ireland seized the data? (502 comments)

And told the US courts that it must make its request through them.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

top

Court Rules Parents May Be Liable for What Their Kids Post on Facebook

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  5 days ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Parents can be held liable for what their kids post on Facebook, a Georgia appellate court ruled in a decision that lawyers said marked a legal precedent on the issue of parental responsibility over their children’s online activity.

The Georgia Court of Appeals ruled that the parents of a seventh-grade student may be negligent for failing to get their son to delete a fake Facebook profile that allegedly defamed a female classmate."

Link to Original Source
top

X-37B to land on Tuesday

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a week ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "After twenty-two months in orbit, on its second space mission, the Air Force plans to bring the X-37B back to Earth this coming Tuesday.

The exact time and date will depend on weather and technical factors, the Air Force said in a statement released on Friday. The X-37B space plane, also known as the Orbital Test Vehicle, blasted off for its second mission aboard an unmanned Atlas 5 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Dec. 11, 2012. The 29-foot-long (9-meter) robotic spaceship, which resembles a miniature space shuttle, is an experimental vehicle that first flew in April 2010. It returned after eight months. A second vehicle blasted off in March 2011 and stayed in orbit for 15 months.

"
top

The remains of Alexander the Great's father believed found

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a week ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Greek archeologists exhuming a set of three giant tombs have found what they believe to be the remains of King Philip II, Alexander the Great’s father.

Fascinating research, though a close read of the article reveals many uncertainties with this conclusion."
top

Air Force to take over two ex-shuttle hangers in Florida for its X-37B program

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about two weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "In an effort to find tenants for its facilities, the Kennedy Space Center is going to rent two former shuttle processing hangers to Boeing for the Air Force’s X-37B program.

NASA built three Orbiter Processing Facilities, or OPFs, to service its space shuttle fleet between missions. All three are located next to the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building at the Florida spaceport where Apollo Saturn 5 moon rockets and space shuttles were “stacked” for launch. Under an agreement with NASA, Boeing will modify OPF bays 1 and 2 for the X-37B program, completing upgrades by the end of the year.

The company already has an agreement with NASA to use OPF-3 and the shuttle engine shop in the VAB to assemble its CST-100 commercial crew craft being built to ferry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. The company says up to six capsules can be processed in the facility at the same time.

The most important take-away from this news is that it strongly suggests the Air Force now intends to expand the X-37B program. They will not only be flying both X37B’s again, they might even planning to increase the fleet’s size from two ships."

top

Multitasking Damages Your Brain And Career

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about two weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "You’ve likely heard that multitasking is problematic, but new studies show that it kills your performance and may even damage your brain.

Research conducted at Stanford University found that multitasking is less productive than doing a single thing at a time. The researchers also found that people who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information, or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.

A Special Skill?

But what if some people have a special gift for multitasking? The Stanford researchers compared groups of people based on their tendency to multitask and their belief that it helps their performance. They found that heavy multitaskers—those who multitask a lot and feel that it boosts their performance—were actually worse at multitasking than those who like to do a single thing at a time. The frequent multitaskers performed worse because they had more trouble organizing their thoughts and filtering out irrelevant information, and they were slower at switching from one task to another. Ouch.

Multitasking reduces your efficiency and performance because your brain can only focus on one thing at a time. When you try to do two things at once, your brain lacks the capacity to perform both tasks successfully."

Link to Original Source
top

SWAT teams kill another innocent citizen in raid

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about two weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Another late night raid of a citizen’s home, based on the lies of a drug user, has resulted in the death of that innocent citizen.

The police entered the home without knocking or identifying themselves. Their warrant apparently required them to knock first. The home had been burglered two nights earlier by the drug user, so the homeowner’s were understandably on edge.

This is nothing more than murder. It is also unconstitutional. Every police SWAT team in the nation should be dismantled now. We managed for 200 years without them, and can do so again."
top

DHS has Blank Check to Scan Other Civilian Agencies for Network Vulnerabilities

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about two weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "The Department of Homeland Security has spelled out its intentions to proactively monitor all civilian agency networks for signs of threats, after agencies arguably dropped the ball this spring in detecting federal websites potentially harboring the Heartbleed superbug.

In May, Homeland Security officials told House lawmakers at a hearing that the department planned to expand Einstein's capabilities and deployment. At the time, Einstein's latest iteration, EINSTEIN 3 Accelerated, only covered seven departments and agencies. Extending coverage "has been significantly delayed by the lack of clear authorities for DHS," National Cybersecurity Communications Integration Center Director Larry Zelvin testified.

The new formalized process for vulnerability scans pertains only to public-facing civilian agency networks. The procedures involve surveilling Internet-accessible addresses and segments of agency systems for weaknesses on an ongoing basis, "without prior agency authorization on an emergency basis where not prohibited by law.""

Link to Original Source
top

Marriott fined $600,000 for jamming guest hotspots

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Marriott will cough up $600,000 in penalties after being caught blocking mobile hotspots so that guests would have to pay for its own WiFi services, the FCC has confirmed today. The fine comes after staff at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center in Nashville, Tennessee were found to be jamming individual hotspots and then charging people up to $1,000 per device to get online.

Marriott has been operating the center since 2012, and is believed to have been running its interruption scheme since then. The first complaint to the FCC, however, wasn't until March 2013, when one guest warned the Commission that they suspected their hardware had been jammed."

Link to Original Source
top

Salt Water Powered Car Gets European Approval

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "In a breakthrough that is bound to catch the attention of the oil industry and even electric car makers, a company has just gained approval for its ‘salt water’ powered car in Europe.

A car called the Quant e-Sportlimousine that was presented at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show is the first electric car powered by salt water and is now certified for use on European public roads.

The e-Sportlimousine, built by the German company Quant, runs on an electrolyte flow cell power system made by NanoFlowcell that generates a staggering 920 horsepower, goes 0-62 mph in 2.8 seconds, and propels the car to a top speed of 217.5 mph."

Link to Original Source
top

Homeland Security settles lawsuit of reporter whose home they illegally searched

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "In a lawsuit settlement Homeland Security has agreed to pay $50,000 and promise to return everything they seized — including confidential files and paperwork that identified Homeland Security whistleblowers –during an illegal raid of a reporter’s home.

Audrey Hudson, an award-winning journalist most recently at the Washington Times, told The Daily Signal she was awoken by her barking dog around 4:30 a.m. on Aug. 6, 2013, to discover armed government agents had descended on her property under the cover of darkness. The agents had a search warrant for her husband’s firearms. As they scoured the home, Hudson was read her Miranda rights.

While inside Hudson’s house, a U.S. Coast Guard agent confiscated documents that contained “confidential notes, draft articles, and other newsgathering materials” that Hudson never intended for anyone else to see. The documents included the identities of whistleblowers at the Department of Homeland Security. The Coast Guard is part of Homeland Security.

The settlement requires the government to return all documents, destroy all notes made from these papers, and promise it did not copy anything. Does anyone believe this?"

top

Doctor Boards Atlanta Flight In HazMat Suit To Protest "Lying CDC"

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes ""If they're not lying, they are grossly incompetent," said Dr. Gil Mobley, a microbiologist and emergency trauma physician from Springfield, Mo. as he checked in and cleared Atlanta airport security wearing a mask, goggles, gloves, boots and a hooded white jumpsuit emblazoned on the back with the words, "CDC is lying!" As The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, Mobley says the CDC is "sugar-coating" the risk of the virus spreading in the United States."
Link to Original Source
top

Drone shootdown over New Jersey

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "New Jersey police arrested Russell J. Percenti last weekfor allegedly firing a shotgun at a helicopter drone flying in the vicinity of his home. According to the owner of the drone, it was being used to capture photographs of a nearby home that was currently under construction. While he was flying the drone over the unfinished home to take the photos, he heard several gunshots in the vicinity and immediately lost control of the drone.

When the owner recovered the broken drone, he discovered multiple holes that were likely the result of at least one shotgun blast."

Link to Original Source
top

Something keeps coming and going in a sea on Titan

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Cassini images taken in 2007, 2013, and 2014 of one of Titan’s largest hydrocarbon seas find that a mysterious feature there keeps appearing and disappearing.

The mysterious feature, which appears bright in radar images against the dark background of the liquid sea, was first spotted during Cassini’s July 2013 Titan flyby. Previous observations showed no sign of bright features in that part of Ligeia Mare. Scientists were perplexed to find the feature had vanished when they looked again, over several months, with low-resolution radar and Cassini’s infrared imager. This led some team members to suggest it might have been a transient feature. But during Cassini’s flyby on August 21, 2014, the feature was again visible, and its appearance had changed during the 11 months since it was last seen.

Scientists on the radar team are confident that the feature is not an artifact, or flaw, in their data, which would have been one of the simplest explanations. They also do not see evidence that its appearance results from evaporation in the sea, as the overall shoreline of Ligeia Mare has not changed noticeably. The team has suggested the feature could be surface waves, rising bubbles, floating solids, solids suspended just below the surface, or perhaps something more exotic.

That the seasons are slowly changing on Titan is probably contributing to the transient nature of this feature."

top

U.S. Law Enforcement Seeks to Halt Apple-Google Encryption of Mobile Data

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "U.S. law enforcement officials are urging Apple and Google to give authorities access to smartphone data that the companies have decided to block, and are weighing whether to appeal to executives or seek congressional legislation.

The new privacy features, announced two weeks ago by the California-based companies, will stymie investigations into crimes ranging from drug dealing to terrorism, law enforcement officials said.

“This is a very bad idea,” said, chief of the Washington Metropolitan Police Department, in an interview. Smartphone communication is “going to be the preferred method of the pedophile and the criminal. We are going to lose a lot of investigative opportunities.”"

Link to Original Source
top

Huntsville schools say call from NSA led to monitoring students online

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "An alleged phone call from the NSA prompted public school officials in an Alabama school district to launch a surveillance program to monitor students’ online activities, administrators of the Huntsville City School District now admit.

The NSA allegedly took an interest in the Lee High School student body after Auseel Yousefi, a straight-A student, posted a series of questionable tweets about getting into fights and hitting a teacher. Yousefi claims the tweets were intended in jest, but school security officials searched the student’s car and found a weapon, which he says is a “jeweled dagger from a Renaissance fair.”

That was all the evidence school authorities needed to expel Yousefi for the semester and launch a district-wide information-gathering program aimed at discovering security threats and identifying gang members. The subsequent investigation led to a series of expulsions of students who were found posing on social media holding guns or throwing gang signs.

School administrators say the wider surveillance program was conducted at the behest of the NSA, but the security agency now denies it ever called the school."
top

California Gov Brown Vetoes Bill Requiring Warrants for Drone Surveillance

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Brown, a Democrat facing re-election in November, sided with law enforcement and said the legislation simply granted Californians privacy rights that went too far beyond existing guarantees. Sunday's veto comes as the small drones are becoming increasingly popular with business, hobbyists, and law enforcement.

"This bill prohibits law enforcement from using a drone without obtaining a search warrant, except in limited circumstances," the governor said in his veto message(PDF). "There are undoubtedly circumstances where a warrant is appropriate. The bill's exceptions, however, appear to be too narrow and could impose requirements beyond what is required by either the 4th Amendment or the privacy provisions in the California Constitution."

At least 10 other states require the police to get a court warrant to surveil with a drone. Those states include Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Montana, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin.

California's drone bill is not draconian. It includes exceptions for emergency situations, search-and-rescue efforts, traffic first responders, and inspection of wildfires. It allows other public agencies to use drones for other purposes—just not law enforcement."

Link to Original Source
top

Google to Require as Many as 20 of Its Apps to be Preinstalled on Android Device

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Google is looking to exert more pressure on device OEMs that wish to continue using the Android mobile operating system. Earlier this year, Google laid its vision to reduce fragmentation by forcing OEMs to ship new devices with more recent version of Android. Those OEMs that choose not to comply lose access to Google Mobile Services (GMS) apps like Gmail, Google Play, and YouTube."
Link to Original Source
top

Sierra Nevada protests NASA manned spacecraft contact award

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Sierra Nevada has formally protested NASA’s decision to award Boeing and SpaceX manned spacecraft contracts.

The company said late Friday that its bid in the NASA Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCTCap) was $900 million less than the bid submitted by Boeing, which won a contract worth as much as $4.2 billion to complete development, test fly and operate its CST-100 crew capsule. At the same time, SNC said, its proposal was “near equivalent [in] technical and past performance” source-selection scoring.

“[T]he official NASA solicitation for the CCtCap contract prioritized price as the primary evaluation criteria for the proposals, setting it equal to the combined value of the other two primary evaluation criteria: mission suitability and past performance,” the company stated. “SNC’s Dream Chaser proposal was the second lowest priced proposal in the CCtCap competition.”

In other words, they are challenging NASA’s decision to pick Boeing over them, as their proposal was far cheaper.

We all know that Boeing got the contract as much for its political clout as for its technical expertise. NASA wanted to make sure that members of Congress who promote the Boeing jobs in their districts would have nothing to complain about. Whether Sierra Nevada can get the government to look past that political clout is very doubtful."

top

Your medical record is worth more to hackers than your credit card

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "There's a Reuters article on new types of fraud using stolen medical records.

Last month, the FBI warned healthcare providers to guard against cyber attacks after one of the largest U.S. hospital operators, Community Health Systems Inc, said Chinese hackers had broken into its computer network and stolen the personal information of 4.5 million patients."

Journals

schwit1 has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?