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Comments

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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants to "Fix" the Second Amendment

schwit1 It is not broken (1 comments)

The recent events in Nevada prove even more the need for an armed citizenry. It is one of the last and only things the US government fears.

4 days ago
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System Administrator vs Change Advisory Board

schwit1 "I don't do unfunded mandates" (1 comments)

Like any project, new requirements cost money and therefore must come with the requisite funding.
If it's not important enough to fund then it's not important enough to do.
Put your money where your mouth is.
No bucks, no Buck Rogers ... Gus Grissom

5 days ago
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New World Order - same as the Old One ..

schwit1 On what planet is this writer? (1 comments)

"almost all of mankind is politically awake, activated, politically conscious"

  Most of the people in the US 18-30 care more about their Facebook page and the latest reality TV show than the screwing they are getting from DC.

about a week ago
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Why No Executive Order To Stop NSA Metadata Collection?

schwit1 Re:No Law (312 comments)

The facts do not support your statement There are dates in the Obamacare law that the president has unilaterally changed:
http://dailycaller.com/2014/03...

about two weeks ago
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Should Patients Have the Option To Not Know Their DNA?

schwit1 Re:Sounds like derp. (157 comments)

Yes. Otherwise I suggest you convince our military folks that a bright orange uniform is just as safe as camouflage.

Camouflage is security through obscurity.

about three weeks ago
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Million Jars of Peanut Butter Dumped in New Mexico Landfill

schwit1 Reason? Lawyers (4 comments)

They had no real option unless they were given blanket immunity for any ill effects, real or concocted. Do we need good-samaritan laws on donated food?

about three weeks ago
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U.S. Court: Chinese Search Engine's Censorship Is 'Free Speech'

schwit1 Re:What. (284 comments)

Freedom of speech doesn't mean I have to give you my microphone.

about three weeks ago
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Target and Trustwave Sued Over Credit Card Breach

schwit1 Mandatory arbitration? (87 comments)

I would not be surprised if Target's credit card purchasing process mandates that all disputes must be arbitrated.

SCOTUS has consistently ruled that these mandates are legal and binding.

about three weeks ago
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Verizon Knows your Wi-Fi SSID and Key

schwit1 Re:Solution (4 comments)

This may not be accurate for everyone. I unplugged the coax to the actiontec and a week later noticed I was no longer receiving TV listing updates. Everything else seemed to continue working as before.

about three weeks ago
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New analysis of Immarsat indicates MH370 lost West of Perth

schwit1 Immarsat or Inmarsat? (3 comments)

What is Immarsat?

about a month ago
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Why Buy Microsoft Milk When the Google Cow Is Free?

schwit1 Google is NOT free (409 comments)

Google treats your data(the product) no differently than Facebook. It is there to be mined for the benefit of the advertisers(the customer) and Google's bottom line.
https://epic.org/2014/03/googl...

about 1 month ago
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Jesse Jackson To Take On Silicon Valley's Lack of Diversity

schwit1 Re:Maybe he should talk to the NHL? (397 comments)

Or the NBA. They have the same philosophy as silicon valley ... it's all about results.

about 1 month ago
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The Air Force Isn't Ready to Replace the A-10

schwit1 They were wrong then and he is wrong now (1 comments)

"It cannot survive or operate effectively where there are more advanced aircraft or air defenses"

This same statement has been made for 30 years about the A10 and the warthog has always proven them wrong. The bottom line is that Hagel is a political hack, not a military strategist. The F35 has about as much relevance as the AH64 Comanche. UAVs are the future, not manned aircraft.

about a month ago
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Flash Is Dead; Long Live OpenFL!

schwit1 Security? (166 comments)

How is openflash supposed to more secure than adobe flash?

How do we know this isn't an NSA front organization?

about a month ago
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Russian Army Spetsnaz Special Forces Teams Arrested Operating In Ukraine

schwit1 Spys should be shot (1 comments)

No insignia means they do not get the benefit of the Geneva convention

about a month ago
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NYTimes OP-ED on the rise of the Global Commons and the rise of Anti-Capitalism

schwit1 It's not a hot water heater ... (1 comments)

You don't need to heat the water if it's hot. The device is actually a cold water heater.

about a month ago
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US miltiary base in Ukraine?

schwit1 That won't aggravate the situation (2 comments)

Why not ask Turkey to close the Bosporus while you are at it?

I do agree that appeasing an aggressor will only make him more aggressive, but you also don't antagonize them.

about a month ago

Submissions

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Use drones and infrared cameras to find illegal cannabis, and steal it

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  2 days ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "There has been a huge surge in the number of hidden cannabis farms across Halesowen, Cradley Heath and Oldbury, towns on the outskirts of rural Shropshire some seven miles from central Birmingham.

They require hydroponic lights for the marijuana plants to grow – and the huge amounts of excess heat given off make them easily spottable for a would-be criminal in the know.

One such man told the Halesowen News that after finding a property with a cannabis farm he and his crew either burgle or “tax” the victim."

Link to Original Source
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The EPA admits it doesn't have the data to justify its environmental regulations

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  4 days ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "In a stunning admission, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy revealed to House Science, Space and Technology Committee chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) that the agency neither possesses, nor can produce, all of the scientific data used to justify the rules and regulations they have imposed on Americans via the Clean Air Act.

The EPA was subpoenaed by Congress for the data it uses, and they responded to say that what they have doesn’t really provide any proof that their regulations are necessary. But they then add that they are going to continue imposing their regulations anyway."

Link to Original Source
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8.2 quake strikes northern Chile

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "An 8.2 earthquake struck off Chile's northern coast Tuesday night, causing landslides and setting off a tsunami that forced an evacuation of coastal areas. There were no immediate reports of injuries or major damage, but buildings shook in nearby Peru and in Bolivia's high altitude capital of La Paz.

The U.S. Geological Survey initially reported the quake at 8.0, but later upgraded the magnitude. It said the quake struck 61 miles (99 kilometers) northwest of the Chilean city of Iquique at 8:46 p.m., hitting a region that has been rocked by numerous quakes over the past two weeks. Aftershocks followed, including a magnitude-6.2 tremor and a 5.5 quake."

Link to Original Source
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More Than 1 In 4 Car Crashes Involve Cellphone Use

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Texting and driving is dangerous but a new survey finds talking on a cellphone while behind the wheel may be even worse.

As WCBS 880s Paul Murnane reported from Stamford, the National Safety Council's annual report found 26 percent of all crashes are tied to phone use, but noted just 5 percent involved texting.

Safety advocates are lobbying now for a total ban on driver phone use, pointing to studies that headsets do not reduce drive distraction."

Link to Original Source
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Minnesota teen wins settlement after school takes Facebook password

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "A Minnesota school district has agreed to pay $70,000 to settle a lawsuit that claimed school officials violated a student's constitutional rights by viewing her Facebook and email accounts without permission.

The lawsuit, filed in 2012 by the American Civil Liberties Union of Minnesota, alleged that Riley Stratton, now 15, was given detention after posting disparaging comments about a teacher's aide on her Facebook page, even though she was at home and not using school computers.

After a parent complained about the Facebook chat, the school called her in and demanded her password. With a sheriff deputy looking on, she complied, and they browsed her Facebook page in front of her, according to the report.

"It was believed the parent had given permission to look at her cellphone," Minnewaska Superintendent Greg Schmidt said Tuesday. But Schmidt said the district did not have a signed consent from the parent. That is now a policy requirement, he said.

How is this not a violation of the CFAA?"

Link to Original Source
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TSA missed Boston bomber because his name was misspelled in a database

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about three weeks ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the primary conspirator in the Boston Marathon bombing that killed three people, slipped through airport security because his name was misspelled in a database, according to a new Congressional report.

The Russian intelligence agency warned US authorities twice that Tsarnaev was a radical Islamist and potentially dangerous. As a result, Tsarnaev was entered into two US government databases: the Terrorist Identities Datamart Environment and the Treasury Enforcement Communications System (TECS), an interagency border inspection database.

A special note was added to TECS in October of 2011 requiring a mandatory search and detention of Tsarnaev if he left the country. "Detain isolated and immediately call the lookout duty officer," the note reportedly said. "Call is mandatory whether or not the officer believes there is an exact match."

"Detain isolated and immediately call the lookout duty officer."

Unfortunately, Tsarnaev's name was not an exact match: it was misspelled by one letter. Whoever entered it in the database spelled it as "Tsarnayev." When Tsarnaev flew to Russia in January of 2012 on his way to terrorist training, the system was alerted but the mandatory detention was not triggered. Because officers did not realize Tsarnaev was a high-priority target, he was allowed to travel without questioning."

Link to Original Source
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Obama administration is this generation's 'greatest enemy of press freedom'

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "New York Times reporter James Risen called the Obama administration “the greatest enemy of press freedom that we have encountered in at least a generation" on Friday, explaining that the White House seeks to control the flow of information and those who refuse to play along "will be punished."

Poynter reports that Risen made the remarks while speaking at Sources and Secrets conference a meeting of journalism , communication and government professionals held in New York City. The foreign policy reporter, who is currently fighting a fierce court battle with the federal government over his protection of a confidential source, warned that press freedom is under serious attack in today's America.

In a speech kicking off the conference, Risen claimed that the Obama administration wants to "narrow the field of national security reporting" and "create a path for accepted reporting." Those who stray from that path, he cautioned, "will be punished."

The result is a "de facto Official Secrets Act," Risen explained, making the current White House "the greatest enemy of press freedom that we have encountered in at least a generation." And the media has been "too timid" in pushing back against the onslaught.

Some of that timidity was on display at the conference. Jeffrey Toobin, a writer for The New Yorker, denied that any constitutional protections for his profession even existed. “It won’t take me long to alienate everyone in the room,” he declared. “For better or worse, it has been clear there is no journalistic privilege under the First Amendment.”"

Link to Original Source
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Homeland Security Exercise Targets "Free Americans Against Socialist Tyranny"

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Leaked Homeland Security documents obtained by Infowars reveal details of a joint DHS/FEMA national exercise set to take place this week, one of the components of which revolves around an effort to counter online dissent by a group called “Free Americans Against Socialist Tyranny,” which is disgruntled at the imposition of martial law after an earthquake in Alaska.

As we have exhaustively documented on numerous occasions, federal authorities and particularly the Department of Homeland Security have been involved in producing a deluge of literature which portrays liberty lovers and small government advocates as extremist radicals.

The document also mentions the threat posed by "disgruntled military and Department of Defense civilians," which ties into the talking point, repeatedly promoted by the DHS and other federal agencies, that returning veterans pose a major domestic terror threat.

The Capstone Exercise 2014 document makes it clear that a key part of the Department of Homeland Security and FEMA's preparation for the aftermath of major catastrophic incidents in the United States is centered around combating online dissent which will be sparked as a result of federal authorities and military assets instituting martial law, or what the document refers to as "Defense Support to Civil Authorities".

This is particularly chilling given reports that emerged in 2006 concerning a nationwide FEMA program under which Pastors and other religious representatives were trained to become secret police enforcers who teach their congregations to "obey the government" in preparation for a declaration of martial law, property and firearm seizures, and forced relocation."

Link to Original Source
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Navy database tracks civilians' parking tickets, fender-benders

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "A parking ticket, traffic citation or involvement in a minor fender-bender are enough to get a person's name and other personal information logged into a massive, obscure federal database run by the U.S. military.

The Law Enforcement Information Exchange, or LinX, has already amassed 506.3 million law enforcement records ranging from criminal histories and arrest reports to field information cards filled out by cops on the beat even when no crime has occurred."

Link to Original Source
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Facebook Software Matches Faces Almost as Well as You Do

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Facebook has developed a face-recognition system that works almost as well as the human brain:

Asked whether two unfamiliar photos of faces show the same person, a human being will get it right 97.53 percent of the time. New software developed by researchers at Facebook can score 97.25 percent on the same challenge, regardless of variations in lighting or whether the person in the picture is directly facing the camera.

Human brains are optimized for facial recognition, which makes this even more impressive.

This kind of technology will change video surveillance. Right now, it's general, and identifying people is largely a forensic activity. This will make cameras part of an automated process for identifying people."

Link to Original Source

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Obama transparency getting worse...

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "The government's own figures from 99 federal agencies covering six years show that halfway through its second term, the administration has made few meaningful improvements in the way it releases records. In category after category — except for reducing numbers of old requests and a slight increase in how often it waived copying fees — the government's efforts to be more open about its activities last year were their worst since President Barack Obama took office."
Link to Original Source
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U.S. aims to give up control over Internet administration

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "U.S. officials announced plans Friday to relinquish federal government control over the administration of the Internet, a move likely to please international critics but alarm some business leaders and others who rely on smooth functioning of the Web.

Pressure to let go of the final vestiges of U.S. authority over the system of Web addresses and domain names that organize the Internet has been building for more than a decade and was supercharged by the backlash to revelations about National Security Agency surveillance last year."

Link to Original Source
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HHS official resigns, pens a must-read rebuke of federal bureaucracy

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "A Health and Human Services official has resigned after dealing with the frustration of the “profoundly dysfunctional” federal bureaucracy, which left him “offended as an American taxpayer.”

In a resignation letter obtained by ScienceInsider, David Wright, director of the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) which oversees and monitors possible research misconduct offers a scathing rebuke of the unwieldy and inefficient bureaucracy that he dealt with for the two years he served in the position.

In his letter to Assistant Secretary for Health Howard Koh, Wright explains that the 35 percent of his job that was spent working with science-investigators in his department "has been one of the great pleasures of my long career." The majority of his duties, however, represented his worst job ever.

"The rest of my role as ORI Director has been the very worst job I have ever had and it occupies up to 65% of my time," he wrote. "That part of the job is spent navigating the remarkably dysfunctional HHS bureaucracy to secure resources and, yes, get permission for ORI to serve the research community. I knew coming into this job about the bureaucratic limitations of the federal government, but I had no idea how stifling it would be."

According to Wright, activities that in his capacity as an academic administrator that took a day or two, took weeks and months in the federal government.

He recalled an instance in which he could not get approval for a $35 cost to have cassette tapes converted into CDs. He eventually was able to get them converted in 20 minutes for free by a university. And another instance in which he "urgently needed to fill a vacancy," but was told there was secret priority list. Sixteen months later, he wrote, the position was still unfilled.

"On another occasion I asked your deputy why you didn’t conduct an evaluation by the Op-Divs of the immediate office administrative services to try to improve them," he wrote. "She responded that that had been tried a few years ago and the results were so negative that no further evaluations have been conducted."

Wright closed by saying he plans to publish his daily log to further shed light on his work.

"As for the rest, I'm offended as an American taxpayer that the federal bureaucracy at least the part I've labored in is so profoundly dysfunctional. I'm hardly the first person to have made that discovery, but I'm saddened by the fact that there is so little discussion, much less outrage, regarding the problem. To promote healthy and productive discussion, I intend to publish a version of the daily log I've kept as ORI Director in order to share my experience and observations with my colleagues in government and with members of the regulated research community," he wrote."

Link to Original Source
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NYPD Denies Freedom of Information Request for Freedom of Information Handbook

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "Journalist Shawn Musgrave filed a records request under New York’s Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) for the police department’s FOIL handbook, the guide officers use to apply public record law.

However, the NYPD told Musgrave its Freedom of Information handbook is not covered by FOIL, arguing it is protected under attorney-client privilege."

Link to Original Source
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What's wrong with the Comcast-Time Warner deal? A lot

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "The proposed merger would create a behemoth of a monopoly, crushing networks, broadcasters and any content provider looking for a path. With nearly a third of all cable viewers at its command, Comcast could drop stations whenever there was a dispute, not just for part of the country but across the country. For broadcasters it would be like negotiating with a digital Attila the Hun: Surrender or I'll black out your viewers in 19 of the top 20 TV markets in the U.S.

A better path would be to encourage high-speed Internet competition from the likes of Google and then see what innovations and improvements the cable companies can offer to compete. They should focus on building better services, not bigger deals."

Link to Original Source
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Obama Will Seek Broad Expansion of Overtime Pay

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "President Obama, flexing his executive authority once again, plans to order the Labor Department to expand overtime pay requirements to include millions more workers — in a move likely to rankle the business community.

Citing White House officials briefed on the announcement, first reported that Obama will direct his Labor Department to require overtime pay for millions of workers currently classified as "executive or professional" employees. The new regulations to the 1938 Fair Labor Standards Act reportedly would mandate that businesses provide overtime pay for those who work jobs as varied as fast-food restaurant managers, loan officers, and computer technicians. Currently, businesses are prohibited from denying overtime to a salaried worker making less than $455 per week. The rules that Obama is proposing would increase that salary threshold, though it was not clear by how much."

Link to Original Source
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Homeland Security Used Intercepted Emails to Quiz Woman About Her Sex Life

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month and a half ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "The ACLU is filing a lawsuit on behalf of Christine Von Der Haar after she was detained by Customs and Border Patrol at at Indianapolis International Airport during an incident in 2012.

"CBP officers grossly exceeded their jurisdiction. Dr. Von Der Haar’s US citizenship was never questioned; she wasn’t trying to enter, leave, or ship and goods in or out of the country; and she was never accused of any crime. In general, immigration (as distinct from customs) offenses are handled by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Border Patrol, not CBP. We’re curious what basis CBP will claim for its officers’ authority to detain and interrogate Dr. Von Der Haar or obtain her email," asks Papers Please.

Either the DHS is obtaining Americans' emails via their own undeclared (and illegal) snoop program, or they are being aided by the National Security Agency or some other government entity."

Link to Original Source
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Drone pilot wins case against FAA

schwit1 schwit1 writes  |  about a month and a half ago

schwit1 (797399) writes "In a David vs. Goliath battle that pitted the Federal Aviation Administration against the operator of a small model airplane, a federal administrative judge has sided with the aircraft's pilot.

The judge has dismissed a proposed $10,000 fine against businessman Raphael Pirker, who used a remotely operated 56-inch foam glider to take aerial video for an advertisement for the University of Virginia Medical Center"

Link to Original Source

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