×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Google Announces Inbox, a New Take On Email Organization

scubamage Re:Automated digesting (173 comments)

"Excuse me Dave, but the crown prince of Nigeria requires your assistance immediately. Also, there is a marked amount of concern about your penis size, you may wish to speak with a medical professional."

about a month ago
top

Google Announces Inbox, a New Take On Email Organization

scubamage Re:Hmmm ... (173 comments)

Agreed - wave wasn't so much a bad idea as a good idea that was badly sold to people. Glad the functionality is still around because it is useful for realtime collaboration.

about a month ago
top

Wind Power Is Cheaper Than Coal, Leaked Report Shows

scubamage Re:Read the Report (610 comments)

It should also be noted that MIT just developed a system for solar that can provide up to 100% efficiency, which will blow pretty much every other power source out of the water if it can be scaled up.

about 2 months ago
top

Wind Power Is Cheaper Than Coal, Leaked Report Shows

scubamage Re:Too bad... (610 comments)

Not trying to throw my hat in behind the report, but it does say it's an interim report. So they may still be refining numbers. It's very possible that some director said "have a copy on my desk by tomorrow even if the numbers aren't completely ready, just give your best guess." That happens quite frequently in my job at least.

about 2 months ago
top

Wind Power Is Cheaper Than Coal, Leaked Report Shows

scubamage Re:not buying the report (610 comments)

Part time isn't really the issue that it is made out to be. The major problem it causes is that our current grid infrastructures aren't built to handle bursty loads. So, it means there is a ton of room here for innovation in energy storage (both batteries and capacitor banks). The disruption to wind patterns so far seems to be a non-issue. It may actually slightly lengthen growing seasons for farmers nearby because it appears to hinder the formation of frost. In fact, the only actual legitimate concern about wind that I've seen was that the disruption to wind flows from a substantial wind farm makes it difficult to place farms too near one another.

The subsidies, tax breaks, etc that you're talking about? That's in the US. This is for the entire EU. But if you want to put it in US terms, maybe you should also recognize tax subisides given for oil exploration, oil logistics (keystone pipeline XL anyone?), public health concerns from smog and carbon monoxide, military protection of oil and liquified natural gas trade routes, military campaign to protect oil pipelines (Georgia most recently), cleanup efforts when some idiot decides it's a good idea to drill somewhere that no submersibles can reach, etc. In fact, the actual price of a gallon of oil in the US is somewhere in the range of $16 when all ancillary costs are factored in.

about 2 months ago
top

Wind Power Is Cheaper Than Coal, Leaked Report Shows

scubamage Re:as the birds go (610 comments)

When I was staying at the Aria hotel in las vegas, about every 10 minutes you'd hear the telltale "thunk!" sound. Nothing else makes that sound.

about 2 months ago
top

Wind Power Is Cheaper Than Coal, Leaked Report Shows

scubamage Re:as the birds go (610 comments)

I had no idea that the bird mortality rate was that high. Is most of that infant mortality?

about 2 months ago
top

Wind Power Is Cheaper Than Coal, Leaked Report Shows

scubamage Re:as the birds go (610 comments)

First, nice low number. Second, "waste" is subjective here. A dead bird at the site of a wind farm will most definitely feed lots of scavengers, be they bugs, foxes, whatever happens to go by. Most of nature won't turn up a free bird dinner, even if it is a little bruised.

about 2 months ago
top

The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

scubamage Re:WTF? (622 comments)

Everything in life is a cost benefit analysis.

about 2 months ago
top

The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

scubamage Re:Victim blaming? (622 comments)

Pretty much this exactly. People need to understand that online storage is essentially like having a stranger drive up to you in their windowless van, and offering to store stuff for you that you can get back anytime you want. You don't really know him. He promises "industry grade security!" on his van, and sleek curved corners on the van and maybe a recognizable fruit logo. You are taken in, and start storing your photos, your essays, your financial information, etc on his van. Except, what is industry grade security? What industry? How do you know he isn't looking at your stuff? How do you know he isn't parsing your stuff and selling that information? If you started reading warnings about this guy and his storage van on the news and online, would you still use his service? Because guess what - almost every single cloud storage company has had those warnings posted about them. It's not your fault if you fail to vet a service out, and give this guy $50 and he drives away and starts selling your stuff, you're right. But you're a dumbass for trusting someone you don't know blindly with things you don't want out in the public.

about 2 months ago
top

PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

scubamage Re:Let's get our priorities straight here! (367 comments)

That is a fair point. Most of the least harm doctrine studies have pointed towards a 50% approach (at least for Australia). Those studies are a few years old, so it's likely they've had time to do more work since then.

about 2 months ago
top

PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

scubamage Re:The sliding scale of activist groups. (367 comments)

Not at all. The original statement was that we don't need them anymore. I provided a current example of a place where they are needed. You're trying to take that example out of context.

about 2 months ago
top

PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

scubamage Re:Pretending to be unhappy is PETA's schtick (367 comments)

This is actually one place that I have to actually say PETA does buck the trend. Newkirk only makes about 38k a year through PETA as the CEO. Now, that doesn't preclude her from cashing in on lucrative speaking engagements all over the place.

about 2 months ago
top

PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

scubamage Re:Let's get our priorities straight here! (367 comments)

1 hectare of ruminant foraging pasture leads to approximately 7.5 animal deaths (about the number of cattle that can graze on one hectare). 1 hectare of plant producing land produces tens to thousands of animal deaths (depending on the study and what animals are included in it). Essentially, according to most "least harm doctrine" studies, the most ethical approach is in fact to eat MORE meat, because less animals overall are killed in its production.

about 2 months ago
top

PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

scubamage Re:Sheesh, what's the problem? (367 comments)

Shhhhh! Don't ruin the head-in-the-clouds holier-than-thou bubble that they try to live in! That's like trying to tell a vegan that anywhere from tens to thousands (depending on which study you look at) of animals are killed per hectare in the commercial production of vegetables! Not to mention the native species that go extinct due to native vegetation being felled to make room for their kale smoothie ingredients. Tillers aren't too kind to field mice, worms, or bugs they encounter. But PETA (and vegans) only really give a damn about animals they find "cute."

about 2 months ago
top

PETA Is Not Happy That Google Used a Camel To Get a Desert "StreetView"

scubamage Re:The sliding scale of activist groups. (367 comments)

This is correct. To this day if you travel to deep in the arctic/antarctic, you NEED a fur lined coat. Nothing else will provide enough warmth to keep you from freezing to death.

about 2 months ago
top

Killer Whales Caught On Tape Speaking Dolphin

scubamage Re:Inter-species communication (152 comments)

Babies receive positive reinforcement every step of the way as their speech patterns develop. There's a reason why they are happy when moms and dads are delighted when all of that goading with "can you say 'ma-ma!??'" or "can you say 'da da!??!'" finally gets an imitated response as early as 6 months. Cognitively though, while they can utter those items that early, they have no idea what they mean. Research suggests that at that point, it's unlikely they comprehend much more than their name and some onomatopoeia-ic vocalizations (NO! - a short, sharp sound indicating to stop what you're doing, similar to the tsh! sound made by cats and lots of other species) up until around 12 months.What drives them to develop so fast is lots of imitation and positive reinforcement from their parents and everyone they interact with. Trying to say that animal communication can be disregarded because of reinforcement or imitation disregards that almost all communication in the socially accepted manner develops based on reinforcement and imitation. All communication begins as mimicry, but given time all evidence points towards cognition developing. It's been seen in parrots, dogs, gorillas, dolphins, chimps, and more.

about 2 months ago
top

Killer Whales Caught On Tape Speaking Dolphin

scubamage Re:Inter-species communication (152 comments)

I think you're understating what parrots are actually able to do. It's easy to generalize as "polly want a cracker," but the very well established case study of Alex the parrot shows they're able to do significantly more AND understand what they're doing.

about 2 months ago
top

Online Creeps Inspire a Dating App That Hides Women's Pictures

scubamage Re: Who's going to use this? (482 comments)

From RTFA men have to have pictures and answer questions, whereas women do not. So, different treatment based solely on sex. A better, non sexist, system would treat both sexes equally.

about 3 months ago
top

Online Creeps Inspire a Dating App That Hides Women's Pictures

scubamage Re: Who's going to use this? (482 comments)

Stereotyping and treating all members of one sex differently than the other sex is the literal definition of sexism.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

top

Dogecoin Cryptocurrency raises $40,000 to provide fresh water Africa

scubamage scubamage writes  |  about 9 months ago

scubamage (727538) writes "TANA, Kenya — March 16, 2014 — Remote villages in Eastern Kenya may not be the first place you think about when it comes to the hot button topic of crypto-currencies but this past week investors and early adopters of Dogecoin used their "magical internet money" to help save lives in an area that suffers from seasonal drought and a lack of clean drinking water.

Over the past week the Dogecoin Foundation, a non-profit organization started by the founders of Dogecoin began accepting and collecting donations for their Doge4Water campaign to coincide with World Water Day on March 22nd. The foundation hoped to raise 40 million Dogecoins (est. $50,000 USD at current exchange rates) to be able to sponsor the Charity:Water initiative of constructing two hand-dug wells to provide access to clean water for the surrounding communities in the Tana River area of Eastern Kenya.

On Friday a generous benefactor who goes by the name of Hood (@savethemhood) helped achieve that goal by making a record tip of 14,000,000 Dogecoins via Twitter. With a tweet berating the wealthy for not doing enough, Hood summed up how he felt with this post, "It is astonishing that we have fellow humans on this planet without water. We have the wealth, but not the will. The greedy do nothing...." Users and foundation members alike were overwhelmed with an outpouring of gratitude on the /r/Dogecoin subreddit.

Since its beginning in early December the Dogecoin community has used their popularity and growing monetary value to help out several causes and charities. Donations from Dogecoin helped the Jamaican bobsled team to travel and compete in this year's Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia as well as fostering a community based not so much on gaining wealth but on giving it away. Hundreds of thousands, if not millions of Dogecoins are given away through tips each day on Reddit, Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms.

While cryptocurrency has been a high profile topic this past week as to whether it should be regulated, especially due to several well publicized thefts and losses, or as to who the inventor may or may not be, the one coin which seems to take itself a little less seriously than the others firmly made its case that alternative currency can change the world, and for the better.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Uber car attacked in Paris during Taxi Strike

scubamage scubamage writes  |  about a year ago

scubamage (727538) writes "A major protest by taxi drivers at Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris saw an improvised barricade force drivers single-file through a gauntlet of taxis, where Uber cars and other independent taxi vehicles were attacked. They had their windows busted, tires slashed, paint flung at them while taxi drivers attempted open doors and drag out passengers and drivers. Reports say that police were present, but did nothing to stop the attacks.
At least the downfall of traditional post to email has never seen people being beaten in the streets?"

Link to Original Source
top

University of Florida Cuts Computer Science, Ups Athletic Budget

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 2 years ago

scubamage writes "In an incredulous move, the University of Florida has cut its Computer Science and Engineering Department in an effort to save 1.7 million dollars a year. Yet at the same time, it has increased funding to its athletics department by more than 2 million dollars a year. The move has spurred criticism across the industry and academia, and caused the launch of a "Save the CS Department" website, and incited student protests. Ironically, all of this seems to be happening as Florida Governor Rick Scott is evangelizing a push towards STEM education (while cutting education budgets by more than 30%)."
Link to Original Source
top

Ask Slashdot: A cheap, DIY home security and surveillance system?

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 2 years ago

scubamage writes "Approximately 6 weeks ago, my home was broken into while my fiance and I were at work. Our neighborhood is essentially empty during the day because it's an upper middle class neighborhood. Two laptops were stolen, an iPad, a power brick, a safe (complete with several years worth of taxes, my birth certificate, and old copies of my driver's license), a digital SLR, several pieces of heirloom jewelry, a guitar, and a custom built saxophone. In total, we lost around $20-30,000 dollars that day. We are now dealing with an attorney because the homeowner's insurance is fighting us on a number of items and we're not backing down. It has been a nightmare. Now as we were hoping things were starting to calm down, we've noticed that someone has been visiting our house during the day. There has been garbage left sitting on our back porch table, so its unlikely to have blown there. We've also seen footprints in our garden that are not there in the morning. We want to know who is on our property while we're not, and maybe if we're really lucky reporting it to the police could recover some of our property. My fiance has asked me to assemble a home security system that is motion activated, and both notifies us of an entry, as well as records video or rapid HD stillframes when sensing motion. The goal is to do this cheaply and more effectively than going with a private security company like ADT (who, consequently, our police department told us to ignore due to the incredibly high rate of false alarms). Also, we already have gotten the dog and the gun, so we have those bases covered now. What suggestions do you have on setting up home security systems, and what have you done to build one in the past? Help me slashdot posters, I need your brain juices!"
top

Online Study for Masters/PhD in IT?

scubamage scubamage writes  |  about 5 years ago

scubamage (727538) writes "After my housemate recently announced his intention to return to academics and pursue a master's degree, I have started pondering doing the same. I kind of hate knowing that I've put years into a degree (BA in Clinical Psychology) which currently does me no good. However, I can use it as a stepping stone towards a Master's Degree in my chosen field. I'm lucky to say that I enjoy IT, and I'd like the pay scale and management/job opportunities that a Master's degree would bring. However, given my work/oncall schedule, going to brick and mortar school is going to be highly difficult (irregular schedule, being on call a week at a time, etc). Online classes seem to be the right choice, but I know from speaking with numerous people in HR departments that online universities tend to be looked down upon in comparison to their traditional brethren. The best recommendation I've gotten was to pursue a traditional institution which offers online distance learning classes. I've looked at Drexel University's MSIS degree, but it seems to be more about software product development/analysis, and less about actual information systems and technology based on the curriculum they have listed. The curriculum I'd prefer to be studying is something similar to PSU Great Valley's MSIS Program(yes, I know the second one is brick and mortar). I know there have to be other options out there. Can you, the folks of slashdot, help shine some light on them? It would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!"
top

A Free/OSS Hardware Deployment Solution?

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 4 years ago

scubamage (727538) writes "

I work for a small technology firm and am responsible for server/workstation builds, among other things. We deal with a number of different systems, but are mainly a HP shop. I am trying to find a solution for our deployments so that we can roll out system images to X number of servers/workstations, while also keeping an archive of the image for fast restoration if a customer/field technician has an issue.

So far every product we have found which addresses our issues has some major problems. Ghost by Symantec doesn't support RAIDs or Server OS's, so that option is down the tubes. Further, Sysprep is necessary to make a usable image. We also investigated Acronis Snap Deploy 3 which seemed perfect, however it wasn't until we had already purchased a few licenses that we discovered how prohibitive their licensing is (we had been told by their presales support that one license would be good for one concurrent imaging task; turns out that the licenses bind to the MAC Address of the chassis that you deploy to, so our one license was exhausted after the first successful test deployment, yay wasted money!). To keep using the software we would need to keep purchasing licenses which is not only an administrative nightmare, but it will quickly become prohibitively expensive — especially since the cost of server licenses is triple the workstation license price.

So, we are back at square one. We need software which can be used for deploying system images, is capable of recognizing and handling RAIDs, is compatible with both workstation and server OS's, and is relatively simple to use (we would like to use it in the field for our technicians off site, which means I have to be able to guide them through its usage). It would be a real boon if we could use the same image to deploy on to dissimilar hardware similar to acronis' Universal Deploy utility. It would be even better if we didn't need to resort to sysprep, though I'll live if we need to. So, I throw myself humbly at your feet /. — please help!

"
top

Monsanto backed bill could outlaw organic farming

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 5 years ago

scubamage (727538) writes "Congresswoman Rosa Delauro (D-CT) has introduced legislation which could potentially destroy both small and organic farming as we know it. The bill, HR 875, forces pesticides, herbicides, and any new chemicals developed to be used by all farmers in the name of "food safety and sanitation." It would also seek to outlaw seed banking, enforce mandatory GPS tracking of all livestock, and to create a new governing body to oversee food safety without any oversight. This includes warrantless searches of all food production facilities. Further, it would require such intense record keeping that it could quite literally strangle many small farmers out of business. It is also interesting to note that Ms. Delauro is married to Stanley Greenberg — a political strategist whose clients include none other than Monsanto: the world's largest producer of herbicides, pesticides, and genetically modified food products."
top

US Power Grid and other Infrastructure Breached

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 5 years ago

scubamage (727538) writes "According to this article in the Wall Street Journal, both Chinese and Russian agents have infiltrated US infrastructure systems in an attempt to map out their contents. So far intelligence officials believe the acts are solely for reconnaissance, but they have found that tools were left in place which could have been used to cause damage and disrupt the power grid. Officials warn that similar probes and attacks could be possible against sewage, and other utilities. Further, intelligence officials have noted that reported attacks are growing in number — more than tripling from 20,000 in 2006 to almost 70,000 in 2008. What I personally want to know is why these systems need to be publicly accessible at all? Do we need people at a nuclear power plant reading fark and slashdot all day? Why risk exposing such critical systems? Surely these companies can afford leased lines to keep a private network, well, private and well away from the public internet."
top

Tree-shrew is heavyweight boozer

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 6 years ago

scubamage writes "According to BBC News, "A tiny tree-shrew that lives on alcoholic nectar could — pound for pound — drink the average human under the table, scientists have discovered." The shrew lives on fermented necter of an indigenous palm tree. Videos are included in the story. I want to party with this rodent!"
top

Google opens Philanthropy Branch

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 6 years ago

scubamage (727538) writes "This morning Google announced the opening of a new Philanthropic branch of their company, Google.org. Google has pledged 1% of all revenue to be devoted to their philanthropic interests which include five major focus areas: Predict and Prevent, Inform and Empower to Improve Public Services, Fuel the Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, Develop a Renewable Energy Source Cheaper than Coal, and Accelerate the Adoption of Plug-In Vehicles. The effort is to make good on early company plans to use the corporate powerhouse's technology to improve the world around them. More information can be found here."
top

PA House Considering ban on online ordinations

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 7 years ago

scubamage (727538) writes "Many of you may be familiar with the Universal Life Church, a liberal online church who offers ordinations for any who seek them free of charge over the internet. While being completely allowed under the freedom of religion clause in the first amendment, the church recently suffered a blow when Judge Marcia Cook of York County annulled a marriage because it was solemnized by a ULC minister on the basis he had no physical church or congregation. Now, before the PA House of Representatives is Bill 1099, which seeks to invalidate all online ordinations in the state of Pennsylvania. Similar attempts have been made in other states but were later ruled unconstitutional. Should this bill pass it could have chilling constitutional consequences on how religion is practiced in the US by giving other states a boilerplate to work from in passing similar legislation."
top

scubamage scubamage writes  |  more than 7 years ago

scubamage writes "On the 14th of April, Stanford University scientists announced the completion of the experimental phase of Gravity Probe B, a test of Einstein's theory of relativity and gravity. To quote, "One way to think about space-time is as a large fishing net. Left unperturbed and stretched out flat, it is straight and regular. But the minute one puts a weight into the net, everything bends to support that weight. A weight that was spinning would wreak even more havoc with the net, twisting it as it spun. The mass-energy of the planet earth represents a "weight" in our net of space-time, and the daily revolutions of the earth, according to Einstein's theory, represent a twisting of local space-time. GP-B will search for this twisting effect, which has never before been measured." The tests so far have shown that Einstein was correct at least in the fact that there is a distortion. The actual drag created on time space is still being calculated. The stanford article can be found here. The official press release in PDF format can be found here."

Journals

scubamage has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?