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Ask Slashdot: What's the Most Hackable Car?

sdguero Software or Hardware? (180 comments)

If we are talking about both, I'd vote for one of my vehicles, a 2003 Dodge Ram 1500 with the HEMI engine. I bought it for $7500 (in 2012), spent $200 on a cold air intake, $600 on a magnaflow exhaust (got a deal), and $300 on a perofrmance tuner for it ( allows adjusted ECU, shift points, rev limiter, top speed governor, etc). It was quick before, but now the thing HAULS ASS. I never Dyno'd it but I'd guess I'm making an extra 40-50 HP from the combined effect of those changes and runs a high 14 sec 1/4 mile now, which is friggin fast for a full size truck that weighs over 5000 pounds. For reference that is about as fast as a 90's era Mustang GT, or corvette. And because it's a cheap truck I beat on it, haul dirt/wood/concrete/whatever, and pretty much do whatever i want to it as far as interior/stereo etc. It's fun to have a vehicle that large, and that performant that I can modify however I want. Gas mileage sucks (around 11 MPG), but otherwise I love it.

Here are similar trucks at the drag strip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

yesterday
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It's Not Developers Slowing Things Down, It's the Process

sdguero Don't dis the process, embrace it. (175 comments)

The team I work on reports to a senior director who abhors process. His distaste for it comes from his roots as a rockstar developer at a startup. He often says things like "we just need to fix it" or "this should be simple" and gets frustrated in meetings with teams who push back asking for more information. While being very vocal in meetings, he never creates any documentation or requirements to guide teams. Nor does he consider the impact of the changes to, what can only be described as a giant hairball of a product that we work on. As a contributing software engineer and scrum master, he makes my job very difficult at times. Particularly because he has no respoect for the process and does not develop crisp requirements. Our critical response team (for bad customer issues) also is a direct report to him so he will often distract teams with firedrills, trying to shoehorn code changes and testing into the development process that is already underway. And his firedrills often have no bounds.

My point is that process, whether it be agile or waterfall, has to be respected in order for development and test teaams to run efficiently. One bad apple, higher up in the management hierarchy, can grind a large group of engineers to a halt. Talented engineers who are unproductive will have low morale and will start looking at other opportunities. All of this will cost a company a lot of money.

It is easy for a developer to bitch about process and avoid it like the plague, yet the stuff (s)he actually works on is usually a direct result of that hated process. Individual contributers can skirt a lot of that work and still help the company achieve it's goals. But when that attitude creeps into maangement get ready to watch things fall apart.

yesterday
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FCC Confirms Delay of New Net Neutrality Rules Until 2015

sdguero Does Not Matter (127 comments)

No matter when it passes, who passes it, or what the wording is, any new rules put in place by the FCC are beholden to political pressure which is powered by lobbyists. https://www.opensecrets.org/lo...

about two weeks ago
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Rhode Island Comic Con Oversold, Overcrowded

sdguero Re:First hand report (126 comments)

Yeah thats what they do when a venue is over the capacity limit (anyone who leaves isn't allowed back in). Suspect events will often get crashed by the fire marshal, and if they are over capacity the hammer comes down. I've seen it happen twice in San Diego. The first time I went to pee and couldn't get back to my designated driver. Ended up having to take a $40 cab ride home... :(

about three weeks ago
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Skilled Foreign Workers Treated as Indentured Servants

sdguero The depressing part (284 comments)

The depressing part is there really isn't anything we can do about it. Voters by and large don't care. IT workers get paid more than Joe the Plumber, and the job is much easier than tearing out sewer pipes.

about three weeks ago
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FBI Director Continues His Campaign Against Encryption

sdguero What's the difference... (284 comments)

between banning encryption and banning banks, safes, and safety deposit boxes?

about a month ago
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FBI Warns Industry of Chinese Cyber Campaign

sdguero Re:It's time to start a trade war. (106 comments)

My gradnfather fought in a real war. From what he told me, it was nothing like this.

about a month ago
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Scanning Embryos For Super-Intelligent Kids Is On the Horizon

sdguero Re:What's the big deal with intelligence? (366 comments)

My kid is happy. It makes me happy that sh'es like that. I don't know if she'll work a dead end job or not, nor do I know what that has to do with being a better person. I ust hope we don't lose touch when she becomes an adult because I love her so much.

How many kids do you have?

about a month ago
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Bill Gates: Piketty's Attack on Income Inequality Is Right

sdguero Flat tax (839 comments)

Everytime I read about some rich guy, or some smart guy, talking about taxes and proposing some new system I wonder the same thing... What is wrong with a flat tax?

If there was a flat tax (10-25%, whatever makes sense) on everything we buy, land, goods, stock, etc. I think it would fix a lot of our problems. It would bring an end to high frequency trading, it would tax the rich more than the poor (because they buy moe expensive stuff), but would make the tax % burdern equal on all of us so hopefully nobody can complain. A flat tax would level the playing field in so many ways...

about a month ago
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Tesla Announces Dual Motors, 'Autopilot' For the Model S

sdguero Re:Awesome (283 comments)

In San Diego, $100k is middle class. It's pretty much impossible to buy a house (~$450,000 for a cheap house) or have a family if you make less than $100k.

about a month and a half ago
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Tesla Announces Dual Motors, 'Autopilot' For the Model S

sdguero Re:73% tax return (283 comments)

It must cost a lot of tax dollars to give Tesla owners so much money back...

about a month and a half ago
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James Bamford Releases DOJ Report On NSA Warrantless Wiretapping From 1976

sdguero I heard similar stories about web traffic in 1998 (54 comments)

I was just graduating high school, an intern in the IT department of a sizable company in CA, my first tech job. We had an issue with a Unix print server and the IT manager (awesome boss who loved the Grateful Dead and drove an old beetle) called in a friend to consult for a couple days. Being a bright eyed youth with lots of interest in how this grey haired consultant was able to command a $150/hr consulting fee, I asked a lot of questions. And he told me some awesome stories about the early internet. This guy was a battle hardened networking/internet engineer going back to the early 1970s (graduated from MIT in the early 60s), he helped connect the first copper trans-pacific data cables from San Fransisco to Asia. Probably the most interesting stories he told were about what the NSA was doing circa 1980s.

He said the buildings that house the trans-oceanic data cables were designed from the ground up with small rooms, broom closet sized, that the primary data cables run through. Nobody other than federal agents with code word level clearance were allowed in via a heavy security door that had a guard 24/7. He said that all data traffic entering those rooms left them with a noticable amount of latency (at the time, late 80s he said it was about 10ms), but no hops. He claimed that the federal government had been monitoring internet activity in these data hubs since the dawn of the web.

I still believe him to this day, and have not been surprised by Snowden's revelations or really any news I see about the government snooping on traffic. The internet started as a DARPA project. It would be stupid to assume that data traversing what is essentially a military network can't be monitored by government entities.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is Reporting Still Relevant?

sdguero Re:No Worky (179 comments)

Dude this gonna be my suggestion to the article. Just automate a screengrab and email. Duh.

about 2 months ago
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The Site That Teaches You To Code Well Enough To Get a Job

sdguero Re:How is that supposed to work? (131 comments)

Pro-Am photography hsa turned into some kind of weird piramid scheme in our circles of friends. It seems like we can't go to a party anymore without some woman in her late 20s (90% of the time it IS a younger woman) trying to sell us photo sessions for $50. Extra weird when they show up taking photos, then facebook friend you and try to sell you prints of the watermarked photos they posted to FB.

about 2 months ago
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FCC Chairman: Americans Shouldn't Subsidize Internet Service Under 10Mbps

sdguero Re:I never thought I'd say this... (353 comments)

I don't think you are reading this for what it is... A way for the monopolies (who Wheeler is a tool of) to continue to subsidize their infrastructure costs. Meanwhile on the surface it tlooks like the FCC has teeth. Hint: It doesn't.

about 2 months ago

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