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Google Just Made It Easier To Run Linux On Your Chromebook

serviscope_minor Re:Pedantic, but... (160 comments)

for now perhaps. In time it will be:

What OS do you run?
SystemD.
Favourite browser?
SystemD.
Text editor?
Oh they never got that working but everything else has been removed so I just cat > file.txt I mean sure it's a usability regression for regular users, but apparently the distribution builders love it because they don't have to worry about packing editors.

yesterday
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

serviscope_minor Re:Yawn ... (223 comments)

I'm not actively campaigning against them, I just don't see all that much point.

The efficiency of individual appliences is governed by how well they're built. I don't see how the ability to switch on and off at certain times would come into it. There's already a huge drive for high efficiency appliances, if you go to any store selling them you're beset with all sorts of efficiency claims. The smaller kit doesn't hold up all that well. Apart from not being able to buy appliances with a hot water feed (this is annoying---why can't I use cheap gas heated water?), the thing that tends to dominate water heating is whether I have guests staying or not. Either way though, I don't think gas boilers particularly benefit from small size. It's off most of the time, so when I have guests, the duty cycle is higher.

As for running when one is out, or at certain times: you've been able to buy appliances with timers built in for years to be able to accomodate such things. A house I used to live in had an integrated washer-dryer. I would set it to come on at 2am, and it ran overnight with neither of the residents noticing and one would wake up to fresh clothes. The next place I lived in that had cleaning appliances, I usually hit "go" right before heading off to work or out otherwise. The effect was much the same.

When it comes to differential pricing: yes that is a possibility, however we already have that to some extent. Night time electricity prices are cheaper and so if you wish to engage in such things, you can switch to the "Economy 7" tarriff and have all the heavyweight appliances run when power is cheapest.

Personally, I don't bother because my central heating is gas, so I don't have any super heavyweight appliances which can be run at night.

There are certain applicances which could have some fuzz in the switch on time, more or less anything with an operating range, such as temperature. On the other hand once it falls outside the range, it has to be switched on, and averaging that over 10,000 heaters which willall be at random offsets might not have much difference.

Perhaps for very transient loads, they could be switched off to accomodate.

And of course electric car chargers fit right in.

However, at this point it's less "internet of things" and more "internet of select heavy appliances". Not all heavy appliances need apply. An electric kettle for example despite drawing more than almost any other plug in appliance (3kW), is something that needs to be run on demand and is also very cheap. Other heavy hitters are cooking and power showers, both of which are also completely on-demand and wouldn't fit in.

At this point it's less IOT and more "smart grids", which certainly have benefits too. They also have downsides, for example without extreme care, control systems can cause oscillations. With too much latency and lag between appliances smartly switching on and off it would easily be possible to introduce instabilities. I think that's where quite a lot of the research is.

FWIW smart grids do seem like a much more reasonable thing to me. They're also much more limited. Because they are usually limited ot heavy appliances, there can be strict regs on what gets to go in them. With a bit of care, smart grids could allow replacement of some peaking stations with baseload ones. I think electric cars mesh well into this because they cnd their chargers can act as grid buffers if they can donate some power back. That's one of the few feasible ways of introducing grid scale battery storage.

I'm not against smarter devices (hell, that's my day job at the moment), or internet connectivity. But an awful lot of the IoT hype is amazingly faddish and appears to me to be utterly pointless. Being able to check the news from my fridge door? lame. Being able to check the status of my dryer from work? Even more lame.

yesterday
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Sorry fuckers, not trolling (354 comments)

Hahah! Me too. These threads are fun and I'm not going to sit around quietly while people claims that somehow social justice is a bad thing.

yesterday
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Sorry fuckers, not trolling (354 comments)

Pretty much anyone not being a mysoginistic asshole on these threads gets modded troll. Somehow the MRAs/RedPiller's have got a whole load of mod points.

yesterday
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Blah blah blah (354 comments)

As for the language, your statement did not say what you meant it to say, you said that the predator should feel no remorse, not that people who don't do it should feel no remorse. There is a significant difference in the two.

oh bollocks, it looks like I did too. :(

yesterday
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Do You Even Literate, Bro?! (354 comments)

No, wrong wrong wrong wrong. Goddamnit how many illiterate people manage to get this far on Slashdot?! From THE FUCKING ARTICLE:

Well basically there's some people on here who seem beyond desperate to believe that men never do bad things. I can only speculate as to why, but I suspect that it has something to do with if men cannot do bad things then they as men must be innocent of the bad things they have done.

It's a very odd attitide and hard to explain.

2 days ago
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:If Only the Article Addressed That ... (354 comments)

So what you're saying is women are weaker and more manipulable than men?

Nope. You need to learn to read and reason logically. He said no such thing at all. This is simply you layering whatever the hell is swimming round inside your own head on top.

2 days ago
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Blah blah blah (354 comments)

The grammer nazi's approve of you're corrections irregardless of weather spelling is grammer.

2 days ago
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Blah blah blah (354 comments)

Why do you think? It's the same reason we hear about a white cop shooting a black kid but never about a black cop shooting a white one. What fits the PC narrative?

Yep. All to do with the PC gestapo. Nothing to do with the police actually shooting far more black kids than white ones. We couldn't have that because it woudl contradict the internet whiner narrative.

2 days ago
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Blah blah blah (354 comments)

Tell me more about how women are being oppressed by men and how I, as a man, should be ashamed of myself.

And this is why we still have problems because whiners take everything personally. No one's talling you should be ashamed of yourself for harassing women. It is idiotic to assume that this is a personal attack on you and that you should fling crap as a result.

You should, however, be ashamed of being an idiot.

Anyway, mod me down, MRAs. I've got karma to burn.

2 days ago
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Re:Popcorn time! (354 comments)

It's just words.

Oh good. I was worried for a minute there. It's a good job words have no power and are harmless.

2 days ago
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Behind the MOOC Harassment Charges That Stunned MIT

serviscope_minor Popcorn time! (354 comments)

Woo hoo!

Another ahrassment thread. I'm here with a big bag of popcorn and ready to post.

Wiggle out of this one, harassment denialists!

2 days ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

serviscope_minor Re:Yawn ... (223 comments)

Well, OK, but that's pretty unusual. I like everyone else I know personally has light switches in individual rooms. Also in the UK a 3A lighting spur wouldn't require additional inspection.

2 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

serviscope_minor Re:Paid sick leave (625 comments)

privilege-seeking employees

Yep staying at home when you're sick and having some time off is such a privilige. Over here it's considered a right and is codified in law.

2 days ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

serviscope_minor Re:Yawn ... (223 comments)

These devices need to be in the single-digit prices to make sense to the average joe, and they're currently in the triple-digits.

Even then, I'm not sure they make a whole lot of sense. I mean Wifi LED lightbulbs are not all that much more expensive than normal LED lightbulbs of comparable power. Apart from the first 20 minutes of screwing around dimming and undimming it and changing the colour from the sofa, I honestly can't see that I'd really care about having them. I mean that sort of thing doesn't fulfil any use case.

Likewise with the internet connected dishwasher and washing machine. I have to stand right next to them to fill them up and put detergent in. I really don't know what use having them internet connected would be.

I've heard that there would be some marginal use to have the heating switch off when I'm out of the house. Persumably based on my phone. That might save a small amount of power, though the faff of setting it up and making it sure it works when guests are out and having it burn power when I leave my phone at home because I want to be offline and so on probably don't make up for that.

So, it's not just that it's more expensive it's that it has little utility and a much richer and more varied mix of failure modes that the old devices simply don't have.

2 days ago
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

serviscope_minor Re:Just give the option to turn it off... (787 comments)

Wow holy smug alert Batman.

For your reference this is what you said:

drivers tend to hold gears more because shifting takes time and effort.

No, one doesn't "hold gears more because it takes time and effort". It's subconscious.

As a result, a car with a stick doesn't have the same gearing: there needs to be enough power available to get some reasonable acceleration in top gear *without* downshifting.

Nope. I can assure you that if you floor it in 5th gear in a manual Nissan Serena, you will change speed... eventually. In 4th you'll get it "some time this week". If you want to actually get some accdeleration at 65, you need to drop to 3rd and floor it.

But that stuff domen't dominate gas mileage. It's for the one time every 1000 miles when some lorry starts to pull out.

2 days ago
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Lies, Damn Lies, and Tech Diversity Statistics

serviscope_minor Re:Force women at gun point to join tech (331 comments)

That is like saying that a man that doesn't speak must be guilty.

You what?

Do you recant your original claim that institutional sexism does not exist?

That was the original claim of yours which sparked the whole thread, so it is fair for me to ask if you still make that claim.

You are trying to create your moral justification

Where? You have started claiming this in almost every post. Yet, you persistently ignore my request for you to actually back that up. I ask again. Where in the previous post is any attempt at creating a moral justification. And come to think of it, a moral justification of what? I am genuinely mystified as to what you think I'm trying to justify morally.

And now, because you blatantly ignored another quite reasonable question, I shall quote it again for your benefit:

I didn't say that it wasn't worth looking into because really even if it isn't sexism clearly something is going on.

Well, I'd be interested to hear what other hypotheses you have to explain the data. The data seems to indicate that people rate equally well qualified women as less competent than equivalently qualified men. Assuming that the study is sound and the results are not a satatistical fluke, what alternative hypothese would you test to explain the data?
Imagine you're appying for a grant, what would your experiment be?

2 days ago
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Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

serviscope_minor Re:Just give the option to turn it off... (787 comments)

The high gear thing is important.

Shifting doesn't really take time and effort. I remember moving to the US and driving an automatic for the first time. I found myself subconsciously wafting at the door with my left hand. The reason is that my hand was seeking the non-existant gear lever (and on the side I was used too, not the correct side for the US) in order to change gear every time the engine made an appropriate noise.

It's one of those subconscious muscle memory things.

2 days ago

Submissions

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Ask slashdot: Clusters on the cheap?

serviscope_minor serviscope_minor writes  |  more than 3 years ago

serviscope_minor (664417) writes "Dear Slashdotters,

A friend of mine has recently started a research group. As usual with these things, she is on a shoestring budget and has computational demands. The computational task is very parallel (but implementing it on GPUs is an open research problem and not the topic of research), and very CPU bound.

Can slashdotters advise on a practical way of getting really high bang for buck? The budget is about 4000 GBP (excluding VAT/sales tax), though it is likely that the system will be expanded later.

The computers will probably end up running a boring Linux distro and Sun GridEngine to manage batch processing (with home directories shared over NFS?)."
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Best removable storage filesystem for Linux?

serviscope_minor serviscope_minor writes  |  more than 4 years ago

serviscope_minor (664417) writes "What filesystem do you use for portable disks, especially large ones, under Linux? FAT is simply not very good. Using a proper filesystem (e.g. ext3) preserves the read/write permissions of the original machine which is rather annoying when the disk is moved to a different machine with differet user IDs. So is there a way to have a good filesystem that supports all the unixy things such as symlinks, and an execute bit, but does not require lots of chown'ing as root when moved to a different machine?"
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ARM Based netbook.

serviscope_minor serviscope_minor writes  |  about 6 years ago

serviscope_minor (664417) writes "Shopping in Robert Dyas of all places (note to non English readers, this is a fairly generic hardware store and has only a small selection of electronics at best) I noticed Inkia ARM based netbooks being advertised, though careful readers will note that the specs seem to differ slightly. The specs are the usual netbook ones along with an 800x480 screen 64Meg RAM, 1G flash and a 400 (or maybe 533MHz) Samsung ARM processor and WinCE. So, it looks like the first non-x86 netbooks have arrived. Sadly, this one is rather expensive, being slightly cheaper than the EEE 2G, with a painfully small amount of RAM, less storage and battery power. But this brings up several interesting questions: are they going to get much cheaper, are there ones with more memory, and will it run OpenBSD? The specs are very similar to the Sharp Zaurus 3000 series which runs OpenBSD very well, but running Firefox in 64M is somewhat painful."
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Liquid explosives: no danger and no plot.

serviscope_minor serviscope_minor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

serviscope_minor (664417) writes "It has already been established in a previous article that bringing down an aircraft with liquid explosives mixed on a pllane would be very difficult. The men accused of the plot werer brought to trial and a verdict has now been reached. There was not enough evidence to convice any of them of targeting a plane. So apparently, there was not much evidence of a plot that could not have worked anyway."
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Good profiling tools for C/C++ unser un*x?

serviscope_minor serviscope_minor writes  |  more than 7 years ago

serviscope_minor (664417) writes "It should be well known to any developer that you should only optimize parts of a program which need optimizing. And the way to find those parts is through profiling. This simplifies one point: profiling is difficult. The obvious way is to enable profiling in the compiler and use gprof, but this has problems. Firstly there is no point in profiling a program without turning on -O3 (or which ever), since this can change the results dramatically. Secondly, -O3 will inline functions which can ruin profiling results by making them far too coarse. Even if it doesn't do this, there is no way of determining which part of a function is taking up all the time. So that brings me to my question: does anyone know of profiling tools which do not suffer from these problems? My platform is C++ (using g++) on Linux."
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serviscope_minor serviscope_minor writes  |  more than 7 years ago

serviscope_minor (664417) writes "You heard earlier today that Dell will be shipping Ubuntu on selected models. Naturally, this is interesting to slashdotters. However, the interest generated by a wider audience will ultimately be more important. Well, apparently, this is the 3rd most popuar topic on the BBC at the moment. So apparently this is interesting to a general audience. I believe that this bodes very well for the future."

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