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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

if everyone does this

That is the weak point of the plan. We haven't even managed to get everyone to do email encryption, even though the standards and the easy-to-use tools have been there for almost two decades now. What makes you think you can switch them to a P2P darknet?

I think that a more realistic scenario will be 1% doing what you describe, and 99% being utterly clueless.

5 days ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

Yup. But I still think that you're too much of an optimist. This train wreck can be stretched out for a long, long time.

5 days ago
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Former iTunes Engineer Tells Court He Worked To Block Competitors

shutdown -p now Re:So much for his career (161 comments)

Can you give an example of that from the past, say, 10 years?

5 days ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

There is no bill submitted yet, but it's too early for that (and, well, there's that whole Congress session transition thing). But note that they were willing to go public, first to newspapers, and then in front of the Congress, demanding that either the companies "help out", or that Congress force them to. I'd say that shoots down your claim that they would not want the publicity - on the contrary, they are very much trying to make this public. And given past track record on things like Patriot Act, I can totally see why - there is sufficient support for such measures among the populace when the timing is right (like right now, with all the ISIS panic).

Re: strawman. I was specifically addressing your point to my post, in which I said that FBI is demanding a backdoor by law, and you responded that this is totally not the same thing because it does not pertain to private encryption, while that's exactly what it was about. There's no strawman there, just correcting your misunderstanding of what I was saying.

5 days ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

Uh, what? We're talking about on-device encryption here. That is very much the issue where YOU encrypt things. The FBI are complaining that Apple and Google have made it too easy to do full encryption (and Google has now made it on by default in Android 5.0), and when people make use of it, they cannot decrypt it even with a warrant.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/fb...
http://motherboard.vice.com/re...
https://www.techdirt.com/artic...

5 days ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

Well, FBI is publicly demanding backdoor to all phone encryption. And the outrage is largely restricted to tech forums and such - your typical user is like, "well, if they need it to catch pedos and terrorists, I suppose it's fine?". So it doesn't seem that they're worried much about the backlash.

5 days ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

and it is not possible to declare it so without collapsing the whole financial system to say nothing of dozens of other industries.

You have not demonstrated that so far. Outright ban is one thing, and is indeed not viable. A strict permit regime with mandatory backdoor keys is perfectly viable.

As to controlling everyone with fear, how has that worked out in the P2P piracy struggle? Not at all?

For one thing, the people who are pirating stuff are getting something immediately beneficial out of it, and its value is readily understandable to everyone. Not so with encryption. If you ban/regulate it, 99% of the population simply won't know where to start, or why they even want to - with no premade stuff like Tor bundle readily available etc.

For another thing, penalties for piracy aren't all that harsh in practice. It will most likely be a civil suit, not criminal, and even then they'll offer to settle. Realistically, people know that unless they run a tracker, they will get away with a fine of a couple of thousand or so even in the worst case. Now make it a mandatory 10 year stint in a federal prison for even a single downloaded track, and make the first couple of cases front page news, and then it'll be comparable to what I'm talking about.

What is more, the politics on this issue do not favor the NSA unless they can get people to stop talking about the NSA.

Only at this particular moment - and even then I think you haven't kept and eye on the polls, where 50% of electorate is perfectly happy with whatever privacy intrusions they may have to live with if that makes them "safe" (because the NSA told them it is necessary). And they always have several jokers which have yet to be beaten here in US - "think of the children", "the terrorists hate our freedoms" etc. Come next 9/11 (and it will happen, it's only a matter of then), they will have all the support they need to push that stuf through.

Oh, and in case you haven't noticed, it's already happening. Haven't you seen FBI pushing for backdoors to cellphone encryption? All they need is a few more hawks in Congress, and they will make it a law.

5 days ago
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Peru Indignant After Greenpeace Damages Ancient Nazca Site

shutdown -p now Re:What the hell is wrong with Millennials?! (465 comments)

No, the problem with these systems is rent, because rent is theft. It's profiting from basic needs on the principle of artificial scarcity. Look at our country, there are far more vacant houses than there are homeless families.

“Whenever there is in any country uncultivated lands and unemployed poor, it is clear that the laws of property have been so far extended as to violate natural right.”

You might be surprised as to who wrote that.

5 days ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

You can't regulate it without attempting to decrypt people's messages which is evidence of trying to read them which is politically unsustainable.

Why would you need to decrypt the messages? Most encrypted protocols have some unencrypted handshake when connection is initiated; said handshake can serve as evidence of intent to establish an illegal encrypted connection, if the other party is not on the whitelist.

Or you could even just ban server software capable of providing such connections, again, with only certified users being eligible to possess it.

Unenforceable? You don't need to enforce it for everyone. You just publicize a few high-profile cases, and most people will steer clear for the fear of being next.

5 days ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:Over to you, SCOTUS (379 comments)

"Legal" is not always the same as "legitimate".

about a week ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

shutdown -p now Re:PRIVATE encryption of everything just became... (379 comments)

So? Crypto will be allowed, but heavily regulated, with only certified users allowed to maintain servers that can be connected to over encrypted protocols. All keys used in such connections will be shared with NSA etc.

about a week ago
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Canadian Supreme Court Rules In Favor of Warrantless Cellphone Searches

shutdown -p now Re:Blame Canada! (105 comments)

There is a big difference between a system of law and a system of justice in criminal matters. The former concentrates on precisely following codified rules and precedent; the latter seeks to convict the guilty, free the innocent, and be extremely reasonable with the accused who are not clearly guilty or not guilty (but who are apparently not innocent). Canadian criminal courts are not where you want to rely upon a technicality if you have committed a crime; this is one of many appeals cases where someone convicted on the totality of evidence failed to get the conviction quashed on a technicality. Very few people in Canada would consider what is known of the case would do anything other than convict and let the conviction stand, and most would be shocked if Fearon were set free because the police were not precisely perfect during a search incident to arrest.

The reason behind American evidence rules are not to "precisely follow the codified rules" for the rules' sake. It has a purely utilitarian purpose - it is supposed to be a powerful deterrent law enforcement from conducting illegal searches in hope that they will produce evidence that can be used to convict, by rendering such evidence useless.

about a week ago
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Microsoft Quietly Starts Accepting Bitcoin As Payment Method

shutdown -p now Re:No. They are NOT accepting bitcoin for payment. (107 comments)

Of course they subcontract the actual BTC processing to someone else. That's not the point. The point is that they deemed the demand sufficient to warrant doing something like that in the first place, and to make a public announcement about it.

about a week ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

shutdown -p now Re:Read a map (698 comments)

Secondly do you find it really good to send human to the meat grinder like the russian did ? Personally I think people like you which think sending millions of people to the meat grinder is a valid tactic disgusts me. It is neither courageous to send people to their death that way, nor is it cowardice to admit defeat when your position cannot be maintained.

Thing is, distasteful as you may find it, it's ultimately what won the war. Were USSR to surrender the same as France did, unwilling to pay that high a price, that would mark the complete dominance of Germany in Europe. Given that USSR is ultimately responsible for 2/3 of total Axis casualties (including Japanese; if you only count Europe, that proportion is even more skewed), you can imagine the likelihood of Allied victory if Soviets were knocked out, and their territory - including natural resources such as oil, as well as heavy industry, all far removed from the front lines - would all become German strategic assets. Even if that was doable - which I find dubious - the cost would've been insane. Just as it was, for the country that ended up bearing it, because it could (being a totalitarian state).

about a week ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

shutdown -p now Re:Adblock Plus selling advertising access to user (698 comments)

Allowing non-intrusive ads is an option in Adblock Plus, that you can set as you see fit during the initial configuration step (it's all explicitly spelled out). And my understanding is that the money they're asking for that categorization is basically a fee for the service of verifying that the ad is, indeed, "non-intrusive" under their established criteria.

about a week ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

shutdown -p now Re:Really? .. it comes with the job (769 comments)

I suggest you actually read the decision in Quirin. That constitution applies doesn't mean that they get all the rights that civilians do.

about two weeks ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

shutdown -p now Re:Really? .. it comes with the job (769 comments)

Ex parte Quirin, stating that military tribunals for POWs are constitutional, implies that constitution does apply. That Geneva also applies is orthogonal to that.

about two weeks ago
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Displaced IT Workers Being Silenced

shutdown -p now Re:What does "readily available" mean? (398 comments)

If I were to get a H1B visa, I might want to do the work you currently do for a much lower wage than yours (since I come from an allegedly poor country or something like that).

But you'd also be living in US while working in US, and your cost of living would be the same as for a local worker.

about two weeks ago
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Displaced IT Workers Being Silenced

shutdown -p now Re:Maybe it's time for wage tariffs? (398 comments)

They already pay - there are a bunch of costs associated with filing. Then again, the company that hired me also paid my relocation in full... and trust me, for a family moving across the ocean, that is an expensive proposition - yet they were willing to pay. So no, the count wouldn't be reduced to almost zero. An order of magnitude down would be more likely.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Microsoft adds Node.js support to Visual Studio

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  1 year,28 days

shutdown -p now (807394) writes "Coming from the team that had previously brought you Python Tools for Visual Studio, Microsoft has announced Node.js Tools for Visual Studio, with the release of the first public alpha. NTVS is the official extension for Visual Studio that adds support for Node.js, including editing with Intellisense, debugging, profiling, and the ability to deploy Node.js websites to Windows Azure. An overview video showcases the features, and Scott Hanselman has a detailed walkthrough.

The project is open source under Apache License 2.0. While the extension is published by Microsoft, it is a collaborative effort involving Microsoft, Red Gate (which previously had a private beta version of similar product called Visual Node), and individual contributors from the Node.js community."

Link to Original Source
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Python Tools for Visual Studio 2.0 Beta Released

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  about a year and a half ago

shutdown -p now (807394) writes "My team at Microsoft, which works on Python Tools for Visual Studio — a free, open source extension for Visual Studio that adds support for Python to that IDE — has just shipped a beta version of the upcoming 2.0 release with numerous new features and improvements.

PTVS supports most Python interpreters including CPython, advanced code completion, debugging, and profiling. Some highlights of this release are mixed-mode debugging of Python and C/C++ code with integrated call stacks, stepping and breakpoints; the ability to remotely attach to and debug Python programs running on Linux and OS X; and Django support with ability to conveniently deploy Django websites and services to Windows Azure.

PTVS works with Visual Studio 2010, 2012 and 2013 Preview, as well as the free Visual Studio Shell."

Link to Original Source
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Code from Microsoft submitted to jQuery

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 4 years ago

shutdown -p now (807394) writes "Microsoft has previously announced its support for jQuery JavaScript client framework when it started bundling it with Visual Studio back in 2008. Since then, Microsoft developers, in direct cooperation with the core jQuery team and the community, have developed three new plugins — Templates, DataLink and Globalization. Today, this contribution has finally found its way upstream into the main jQuery code base, and will be included into the upcoming 1.5 release. As all other jQuery code, the plugins are dual-licensed under MIT and GPLv2, making it another rare case of Microsoft contributing code to an Open Source project under the GPL."
Link to Original Source
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Windows Phone 7 Series - Developer Perspective

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 4 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "As previously promised, at MIX10 developer conference, Microsoft has released details about the development side of the upcoming Windows Phone 7 Series.

It is now confirmed that two frameworks for application development will be XNA for games and game-like fullscreen, high-performance applications, and a subset of Silverlight 3 for everything else. Both frameworks support managed .NET code only — no native (C++) code support. Furthermore, the applications are sandboxed, and "unsafe" functionality, such as P/Invoke, is not available. A fairly detailed set of UI guidelines for developers has been made available as well.

The integrated web browser is claimed to be based on Internet Explorer 7 engine with some extra features, such as proper XHTML support.

An single centralized store will be available, called the Marketplace. It will include both applications and other media (such as music). The Marketplace will be the only way to install applications onto the phone (though, supposedly, "enterprise customers" will have some workaround). There will be an approval process for publishing applications on the Marketplace, and, aside from filtering out malware, it will also require that applications are "generally good taste excluding pornography, hateful/inflammatory speech, and gratuitous violence".

On the hardware side, the specifications will be tightly controlled for the benefit of developers. A standard set of hardware buttons is mandated on all phones ("Back", "Home" and "Search"). Screen size is limited to two standard resolutions: 320x480, and 480x800, and touchscreen must be capacitive, with at least 4-point multi-touch. Other requirements hardware requirements include 3D acceleration, GPS, and accelerometer.

Unlike past mobile SDK releases from Microsoft, a free version of development tools for Windows Phone will be available, named "Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone". A preview of that is presently available, complete with an emulator. In the future, a mobile-oriented version of Expression Blend 4, a designer-centric development tool, will also be available."

Link to Original Source
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Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 Released, Supports ODF

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 5 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "On April, 2008, Microsoft has released service pack 2 for Microsoft Office 2007. Among other changes, it includes the earlier-promised support for ODF text documents and spreadsheets, featured prominently on the "Save As" menu alongside Office Open XML and the legacy Office 97-2007 formats. It is also possible to configure Office applications to use ODF as the default format for new documents.

In addition, the service pack also includes "Save as PDF" out of the box, and better Firefox support by SharePoint."

Link to Original Source
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ISO publishes final Open XML specification

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 6 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "ISO/IEC 29500:2008, better known as Office Open XML, is now a published ISO International Standard. Major changes since last public drafts include splitting the standard into "strict conformance" and "transitional conformance" parts, with all the Microsoft Office compatibility hacks going into the latter, "for Office Open XML consumers and producers that comply to the transitional conformance category ... provide support for legacy Microsoft Office applications". The complete standard, including the transitional part, is still rather unwieldy at 7,228 pages; of those, the transitional elements take up only 1,475 pages.

In addition, the ISO press release explicitly references something called "Microsoft Office 2008" at least one time. Presumably, it would be a Microsoft Office release fully compliant with the newly released specification in its final form; however, there haven't been any announcements from Microsoft about a product named "Office 2008" yet."

Link to Original Source
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Exploits generated autpmatically from patches

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 6 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "A group of researchers wrote a paper (PDF) on automatic generation of exploits from security patches. It works by performing flow analysis on the code that is changed by the code to find the boundary conditions that lead to vulnerability in an unpatched version. It's not just theory, either: they have successfully generated exploits for 5 known vulnerabilities in Microsoft products using their algorithm. The authors note that a successful attack using this method is particularly likely when vendor deliberately delays releasing security patches to the general public, to push them in a single bundle on a regular schedule — as is the case with Windows Update and its infamous Patch Tuesday."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Contact me

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 3 years ago

If you want to contact me without spamming article discussions (i.e. if you're new here), just reply to this post.

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