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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:Shot in the back (307 comments)

How much of the distinction in those cases is based on ease of conversion to full-auto? That puts me far outside of my knowledge space.

I'm not a gunsmith so I can only go based on hearsay, but I don't see any particular correlation with ease of conversion on the lists. For the most part, the items on the prohibited list are those firearms which have been "widely recognized" (for some definition of "widely") as military firearms at the time that list was originally drafted. Hence it has e.g. AK, FAL, G3 and such, but not Vz 58. It also seems to be specifically excluding firearms of American origin, such as M14 and Garand (for Garand, the law even allows it to have a the original 8-round magazine). It seems that updates have been rather ad hoc, and my understanding is that those updates (as opposed to the original list) have been driven largely by full auto convertibility, as shown in the past scandals with acceptance followed by recall of QBZ 95 and SIG SG55x. It largely ignores new firearms that have been designed since the list was originally drawn up - XCR, ACR, Tavor, most Kel-Tec offerings etc are all notably missing, and the corresponding manufacturers have seized the opportunity to grab the market in the absence of competition.

Regarding the "moot" between semi-auto hunting & military, I largely agree as well, though I see the five round (or some other small number with slowish reload) restriction as critical to the point of the civilian safety

The effective limit in Canada is more than 5 right now due to that silliness with the distinction of "pistol" and "rifle" magazines, and the fact that they're restricted based solely on that distinction, rather than actual use in a firearm. In particular, Rock River Arms manufactures an AR magazine for their LAR-15 "pistol" (which is a pistol according to the law because it lacks a stock). That one is therefore 10-round. But it is perfectly legal according to the law to load all 10 rounds and then stick it into any rifle that will accept it - and because it is basically just an AR mag with "for LAR-15 pistol" stamped on it, it will go into any AR (restricted), as well as XCR, Tavor, or SU-16 (all unrestricted).

For another example, consider pistol-caliber carbines, such as Beretta CX4 Storm, or Kel-Tec Sub-2000. Those are usually designed to accept some existing popular handgun magazine - Beretta 92 for Storm, Glock or Beretta for Sub-2000 etc. Again, because the mags are considered as designed for use in a handgun, it is perfectly legal to obtain a 10-round one and then use it in a carbine.

But wait, it gets better. The law furthermore restricts the amount of rounds in the specific caliber for which the magazine was designed. But in many cases, new calibers designed in the past 30 years were intentionally made to reuse existing magazines - especially AR ones. In that case, the capacity of the magazine actually depends on which rounds you load into it, and it can be used with weapons of different calibers without any modifications (other than swapping the rounds). The most extreme case in point is .50 Beowulf - it uses the standard AR-15 magazines, but the round itself is ~1.5x thicker. Consequently, a Beowulf magazine that holds 5 rounds - and therefore legal, on the assumption that it would be used with a rifle chambered in Beowulf - also happens to double as a 15-round 5.56 magazine that works in any AR or compatible rifle (i.e. the same list as above). So long as the mag itself is stamped ".50 Beowulf", it is considered designed for that round, and hence legal to use for any purpose, including loading 15 rounds of 5.56 in it and using it with an AR.

So, in effect, someone who is reasonably well versed in gun laws in Canada today can have a military-like semi-automatic rifle chambered in 5.56, with 15-round detachable magazines, and all this is classified as "unrestricted" - meaning it only requires a PAL, and it can be freely transported subject only to basic safety restrictions (i.e. requires a secure enclosure, a trigger lock, or a detached bolt; with an AR, reinserting a detached bolt is a matter of 2-3 seconds), so you can legally drive around with it in the trunk of your car.

For comparison, this is actually roughly equal to the restrictions currently in place in Colorado, and more liberal than either New York or California.

As to how much it actually helps... I don't think it does, to be honest. On one hand, reloading a semi-auto rifle is a very fast thing, especially if it uses drop-free mags (like AR), and has a bolt hold open and bolt release (again, like AR). Search for "AR speed reload" on YouTube and watch a couple of videos to get an idea. It's even faster with pistol-caliber carbines that have magazine in the pistol grip, Uzi-style, because there the movement is a natural "hand finds hand".

On the other hand, frankly, events involving those rifles are extremely rare. It's kinda like airplane crashes - they get a lot of publicity in the press because of that rarity, and because seemingly many people die at once at the same time from the same cause, and of course there's usually a drama involved ("why did poor Tommy decide that he wants to shoot all his friends? he was such a nice boy!" etc), all of which sells. But if you look at raw numbers, the chances of being shot by an "assault weapon", with or without a hi-cap magazine, are somewhere in the ballpark of being struck by lightning on the porch of your house. Most people killed by guns, including in US, are shot by handguns (and usually it's actually .22 LR handguns), and the shooter usually makes just a single shot, sometimes 2-3. So I don't see mag size restrictions as been "critical to the point of civilian safety" at all. Background checks make a far bigger difference.

2 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:Shot in the back (307 comments)

Well, except that that's not how the separation works in practice, at all. For example, Saiga is a hunting weapon by design, but it's on the prohibited list as "AK variant" (while Valmet, another AK hunting variant, is explicitly excluded for some mysterious reason). On the other hand, Vz 58 is not a hunting weapon in any way, shape or form, but it has been on the unrestricted list for ages and is likely to remain there. And, again, why AK is prohibited? Note that we're talking strictly about semi-autos here, so there's no principal difference between Vz, AK and AR at all. Or, for another example, between Saiga 308 (prohibited - AK variant), and M14 (unrestricted) - both are military rifles, chambered in the same caliber, with the same type of furniture etc.

Beside which, the whole division into "hunting" and "non-hunting" weapons is rather moot with a semi-auto. Consider Saiga again. It is a hunting weapon in a sense that it is promoted as one. But, in truth, it's just an AK with different furniture and magazines, not in any way less deadly. Or take Mini-14 - is it a hunting weapon? Most of its users would probably agree, yet its full auto variant, AC-556, has seen military use. And why not? In the end, there is no fundamental difference between a hunting weapon and a military one. A semi-auto rifle is a semi-auto rifle, that's all there is to it. If you already have limits on barrel length and magazine capacity, I fail to see what any further distinctions - particularly ones as arbitrary as specific models of firearms - are adding to the picture.

2 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:Shot in the back (307 comments)

Well, there's that whole separation into unrestricted / restricted / prohibited which has no rhyme or reason to it whatsoever. Why is any AK variant (including hunting Saigas, but not Valmets) prohibited, but Vz 58, in pretty much its original configuration sans full auto, unrestricted? Why is AR restricted regardless of barrel length, while e.g. SU-16 or XCR are not? What's the point of restricting magazine sizes differently from handguns and rifles, if you can take a 10-round AR "handgun" magazine and stick it into a rifle?

2 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:Shot in the back (307 comments)

Incorrect. The restriction to 5 rounds is for semi-automatic center-fire rifles or handguns.

The restriction is 5 rounds for rifles, 10 rounds for pistols. And to be specific, the restriction is on the magazine, not on the firearm. If a magazine is "designed" for a handgun, it's perfectly legal to fill it up with 10 rounds and attach it to a rifle that it happens to fit.

My only conclusion from looking at Canadian gun laws is that they're written by clueless idiots. Then again, it's also my takeaway from US gun laws. It's like they're trying to regulate something, but don't know what it is.

3 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:Shot in the back (307 comments)

The reason why police carry handguns is because it's inconvenient to carry a long gun all the time in a manner that makes it readily accessible on short notice (a regular sling means it's behind your back and takes some time and effort to get into the proper position, and 1-point sling keeps it accessible but not very convenient to carry, esp. if you're running around). A handgun, OTOH, can be holstered, after which it doesn't get in the way.

But as far as actually shooting it goes, a rifle is virtually always better than a pistol - it's faster and easier to aim (because you have two hands at two different points on it), sights are further apart permitting fast-acquisition yet accurate ones like ghost rings, and recoil is much easier to control. Then there's the whole aspect of having a much powerful round compared to a handgun, all other things being equal.

Oh, and regarding it being "too long". This is a lever action, and those exist in versions with barrels as short as 16" - which is what you get on a typical military rifle - except here the rifle will be even shorter with the same barrel because of how the action works. Winchester 1894, specifically, has a 20" barrel as standard, and an overall length of 38 inches, which actually makes it an inch shorter than M16A2 (or Diemaco C7, the standard assault rifle of Canadian armed forces).

3 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:Shot in the back (307 comments)

Bayonets.

3 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:Shot in the back (307 comments)

Notice how this idiot shooter was using a shotgun? That's a shit weapon for a shooting spree like this. THAT is the consequence of our gun control. Hunting weapons are fine and widespread. Human killing weapons are restricted.

What's funny is that you've just demonstrated how clueless you are about gun laws in your own country.

There are many "human killing weapons" (by which I assume you mean magazine-fed semi-auto rifles) that are perfectly legal for civilian ownership in Canada, and are just as easy to obtain as this shotgun. For example, Vz 58, M14, SVT, SKS, XCR, SU-16, RFB...

The reason for that is that your law is written by idiots, and basically consists of a blacklist of "bad" firearms. Because said blacklist is updated very rarely, and because it enumerates things by name, it does not include many modern rifles that are just as efficient, and in many cases more efficient, than many firearms not on the list. For example, Vz 58 is basically an AK competitor, and can do everything that an AK does, in some cases better. Similarly, XCR can do anything an AR-15 can do.

So the reason why this guy had a shotgun is likely because that's what he had at the time he decided it's time to become a shahid, not because he couldn't obtain anything better,

3 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re:yup! (307 comments)

Much like the US, aside from the actual text, there's also the standing judicial interpretation of it, which is where Oakes test comes in.

3 days ago
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Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

shutdown -p now Re: yup! (307 comments)

OP is confusing "assault rifle" and "assault weapon". The former is the term that has been around since WW2. The latter is the term that has been invented by politicians.

Of course, given that assault rifles are, in fact, regulated heavily on federal level, and banned outright in many states (by virtue of having burst fire capability), your original point is similarly moot.

3 days ago
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Automation Coming To Restaurants, But Not Because of Minimum Wage Hikes

shutdown -p now Re:Automation and jobs (712 comments)

I said what I meant. We already have a basic income for the elderly and disabled in the US. It's called Social Security.

Actually, between minimum wage and unemployment insurance, we already have basic income for most people, it's just it's a very baroque scheme that attempts to conceal that fact, and which is not particularly good at properly distributing the load (minimum wage, in particular, disproportionately puts the burden on the poor to subsidize even more poor, because they tend to be the ones shopping in places that pay minimum wage in the first place).

That's why I'm in favor of introducing basic income and ditching minimum wage at the same time.

3 days ago
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Automation Coming To Restaurants, But Not Because of Minimum Wage Hikes

shutdown -p now Re:Automation and jobs (712 comments)

It is an economic impossibility because everyone (well, enough people to make it matter) would just stop working and wait on their check.

Would you do so, personally? I know that I won't, for one.

And with sufficient automation, we don't need everyone to work. Heck, as it progresses further, we won't need most people to work - we won't have jobs for most people, in fact. At some point having a meaningful job may well become a privilege.

And there's nothing wrong with it. It's exactly what "post-scarcity society" is supposed to mean.

3 days ago
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Automation Coming To Restaurants, But Not Because of Minimum Wage Hikes

shutdown -p now Re:This is silly (712 comments)

It may be good for the economy. It may not be so good for the people who can no longer support themselves because they just lost their minimum wage job to a robot.

Sure, because we have not made the necessary arrangement for those people (like, say, universal basic income). The more people are being driven out of jobs by automation, the faster we will do so, though the jury is still out on whether torches and pitchforks will be involved in that process.

5 days ago
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

shutdown -p now Re:I had one for a while. (331 comments)

Sure, but that also made it unpopular for its "excessive" wounding effects. That's one reason it was changed. (Even though you aren't signatories to the relevant conventions, you still profess to follow them).

I don't think this was ever a concern, actually. The position of most major powers (in particular, both US and USSR back in the day) was that it restricts intentionally designing projectiles that expand or flatten (or, well, fragment), but if that happens to be an artifact of the bullet design that is otherwise dictated by other reasons, then that's perfectly okay. For example, it's why US presently authorizes the use of 77gr OTM bullets (Mk262), even though an open tip is basically a hollow point by another name, and the extreme length of the bullet causes it to fragment even better than the original M193 - it's because the bullet is ostensibly designed for accuracy, which necessitates open tip construction, and length is there to maximize the ballistic coefficient; and any increased wounding effects are, well, entirely coincidental. Soviets used the same argument for their hollow tip 5.45 bullets.

But this is getting off topic. :-) We were talking about the vaunted firepower of the SMLE. While the Lee Enfield might have scared the Germans at Mons, it was past its prime by WWII. Now, 20 (or indeed 30) rounds out of a (semi) automatic that's a whole 'nuther ballgame, the capabilities of the round itself notwithstanding.

Yes, as far as Lee-Enfield goes, there's nothing particularly magical about it. In particular, the claim that "rifleman with a Lee-Enfield can achieve higher firing rates than the operator of a machine gun" is pure BS - I would dare anyone do even 500 RPM with a bolt action, and that is where machine gun fire rates usually start (since we're looking at this in WW2 context, Bren was 500 RPM, DP-28 was 550 RPM, MG 34 was 800 RPM, and MG 42 was 1200+ RPM). Sure, out of all bolt rifles of that war, it was probably the best one from the perspective of its wielder, thanks to larger mag and slightly faster firing rate, but in overall context that still doesn't matter all that much.

For this use case, though, Enfield is plenty good. These guys don't really need a military weapon so much so as a brush gun (and I use "brush" liberally here, because the landscape is often quite widely open), mostly to hunt and defend themselves from predators. Should they ever find themselves in a military role, again, they are not really operating as units, but each ranger for himself, in a remote territory with basically no supply chain. So as far as firearms go, they need something really simple to maintain, something that handles lack of cleaning (say, because of lack of supplies for said cleaning) for a long time, can survive rough weather including extreme cold, and has a round that, while being "military legal" (i.e. not soft or hollow point), can still take care of large dangerous animals as well as humans, and that doesn't consume ammo fast. I'd say that a bolt action rifle in a full sized rifle round fits the bill pretty well. The only semi-auto that I can think of that would fit the bill would be some semi-auto AK variant chambered in .308 or 7.62x54r (probably Finnish Valmet hunting rifles, since those are also designed for similar conditions from the get go).

Also, their role is not taking the enemy heads on, but serving as an early detection system in those remote regions, and then possibly reporting on enemy movements. Basically, they're pure scouts, not infantry. So they don't really need a soldier's weapon.

5 days ago
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Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

shutdown -p now Re:How hard is it to recognize a stoplight? (287 comments)

Tech doesn't need to overcome it, that is the territory of the law. At some point, once self-driving cars are good enough and ubiquitous, they will simply be mandatory on public roads, and taking over to control it in an area where it can drive itself would be a crime.

about a week ago
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

shutdown -p now Re:I had one for a while. (331 comments)

Yawing/fragmentation is basically a factor of impact energy (which it itself an impact of velocity), and the structural strength of the bullet, and the latter in particular is affected by its length and the presence of cannelure. It's quite possible to deliberately construct fragmenting rounds in pretty much any caliber, by deliberately weakening the jacket with cuts (you can even make steel-jacketed bullets fragment that way). The nice thing about 5.56, at least in its original incarnation, is that it was capable of that without any special construction, just by virtue of being that fast and having a cannelure.

about a week ago
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Shooting At Canadian Parliament

shutdown -p now Re:Except it's not (524 comments)

With rifles, sure. I don't see any particularly good reason to openly carry one anywhere but range or hunting grounds. And I cringe every time I see one of those videos where some idiot straps an AR to himself and goes walking around the block just so that he can be stopped by a police officer (after they get half a dozen calls) and then argue with him on camera, and upload it to YouTube to bitch about his 2A rights being infringed.

With handguns, though, concealing them is ridiculously easy. Even a full size service pistol can be carried IWB with a baggy t-shirt with no-one around being aware of it at all. Not to mention pocket carry etc. So I don't think that prohibiting carrying those is going to be easily enforceable in a manner that you describe.

about a week ago
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

shutdown -p now Re:RTFA (331 comments)

It depends on the shotgun, actually. With a rifled barrel, you can stretch it out to 150m easily (and 200m with 20 gauge). With a non-rifled one, 100m might even be optimistic.

On the other hand, if you're shooting a polar bear at 100m, does it even count as self defense?

about a week ago
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Shooting At Canadian Parliament

shutdown -p now Re:Considering (524 comments)

It would seem to indicate only that he was not specifically preparing for the spree, and little else - just went nuts, grabbed what he had, and went for it. As noted, if desired, he could have easily gotten any of those other things on fairly short notice, and there's nothing in Canadian gun laws that would stop or even delay him (if he has a shotgun legally, it means that he already has a PAL). Unless he has a criminal record, in which case American laws would have done the same.

about a week ago
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Speed Cameras In Chicago Earn $50M Less Than Expected

shutdown -p now Re:Easy to solve - calibrate them to overestimate (398 comments)

and generally you can also be ticketed if you're still in the intersection when the light is red.

This completely defeats the purpose of yellow (regardless of whether it is "permissive").

about a week ago
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

shutdown -p now Re:May I suggest (331 comments)

I never said anything about AK-47. The standard issue service rifle for Russian armed forces today has been AK-74 since, well, 1974 (in practice, since the beginning of the Soviet war in Afghanistan in 1979 - my dad served there early on, and they all had AK74s by then). It had all plastic furniture except for the stock (which was steel wireframe) since the very beginning, excepting some early pre-production prototypes that used wood. The latest modification, AK-74M, adopted in 1991, also adds a folding plastic stock.

I won't bother with citations, since you can find it trivially by starting with the article for AK-74 in Wikipedia. Or, hell, just punch it into Google image search, and you'll get plenty of pics. Here's some choice examples, most of them from Crimea (you can tell these are Russian soldiers by their camo):

http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...
http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...
http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...
http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...
http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...
http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...
http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...
http://zenphotos.net/zenphotos...

And Chechnya:

http://zenphotos.net/file/Onli...

Or here's the page on the official website of the Russian Ministry of Defense.

Bulgarian Arsenal SLR-104FR is probably the most accurate civilian clone on the market.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Microsoft adds Node.js support to Visual Studio

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  about a year ago

shutdown -p now (807394) writes "Coming from the team that had previously brought you Python Tools for Visual Studio, Microsoft has announced Node.js Tools for Visual Studio, with the release of the first public alpha. NTVS is the official extension for Visual Studio that adds support for Node.js, including editing with Intellisense, debugging, profiling, and the ability to deploy Node.js websites to Windows Azure. An overview video showcases the features, and Scott Hanselman has a detailed walkthrough.

The project is open source under Apache License 2.0. While the extension is published by Microsoft, it is a collaborative effort involving Microsoft, Red Gate (which previously had a private beta version of similar product called Visual Node), and individual contributors from the Node.js community."

Link to Original Source
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Python Tools for Visual Studio 2.0 Beta Released

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  about a year ago

shutdown -p now (807394) writes "My team at Microsoft, which works on Python Tools for Visual Studio — a free, open source extension for Visual Studio that adds support for Python to that IDE — has just shipped a beta version of the upcoming 2.0 release with numerous new features and improvements.

PTVS supports most Python interpreters including CPython, advanced code completion, debugging, and profiling. Some highlights of this release are mixed-mode debugging of Python and C/C++ code with integrated call stacks, stepping and breakpoints; the ability to remotely attach to and debug Python programs running on Linux and OS X; and Django support with ability to conveniently deploy Django websites and services to Windows Azure.

PTVS works with Visual Studio 2010, 2012 and 2013 Preview, as well as the free Visual Studio Shell."

Link to Original Source
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Code from Microsoft submitted to jQuery

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  about 4 years ago

shutdown -p now (807394) writes "Microsoft has previously announced its support for jQuery JavaScript client framework when it started bundling it with Visual Studio back in 2008. Since then, Microsoft developers, in direct cooperation with the core jQuery team and the community, have developed three new plugins — Templates, DataLink and Globalization. Today, this contribution has finally found its way upstream into the main jQuery code base, and will be included into the upcoming 1.5 release. As all other jQuery code, the plugins are dual-licensed under MIT and GPLv2, making it another rare case of Microsoft contributing code to an Open Source project under the GPL."
Link to Original Source
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Windows Phone 7 Series - Developer Perspective

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 4 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "As previously promised, at MIX10 developer conference, Microsoft has released details about the development side of the upcoming Windows Phone 7 Series.

It is now confirmed that two frameworks for application development will be XNA for games and game-like fullscreen, high-performance applications, and a subset of Silverlight 3 for everything else. Both frameworks support managed .NET code only — no native (C++) code support. Furthermore, the applications are sandboxed, and "unsafe" functionality, such as P/Invoke, is not available. A fairly detailed set of UI guidelines for developers has been made available as well.

The integrated web browser is claimed to be based on Internet Explorer 7 engine with some extra features, such as proper XHTML support.

An single centralized store will be available, called the Marketplace. It will include both applications and other media (such as music). The Marketplace will be the only way to install applications onto the phone (though, supposedly, "enterprise customers" will have some workaround). There will be an approval process for publishing applications on the Marketplace, and, aside from filtering out malware, it will also require that applications are "generally good taste excluding pornography, hateful/inflammatory speech, and gratuitous violence".

On the hardware side, the specifications will be tightly controlled for the benefit of developers. A standard set of hardware buttons is mandated on all phones ("Back", "Home" and "Search"). Screen size is limited to two standard resolutions: 320x480, and 480x800, and touchscreen must be capacitive, with at least 4-point multi-touch. Other requirements hardware requirements include 3D acceleration, GPS, and accelerometer.

Unlike past mobile SDK releases from Microsoft, a free version of development tools for Windows Phone will be available, named "Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone". A preview of that is presently available, complete with an emulator. In the future, a mobile-oriented version of Expression Blend 4, a designer-centric development tool, will also be available."

Link to Original Source
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Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 Released, Supports ODF

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 5 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "On April, 2008, Microsoft has released service pack 2 for Microsoft Office 2007. Among other changes, it includes the earlier-promised support for ODF text documents and spreadsheets, featured prominently on the "Save As" menu alongside Office Open XML and the legacy Office 97-2007 formats. It is also possible to configure Office applications to use ODF as the default format for new documents.

In addition, the service pack also includes "Save as PDF" out of the box, and better Firefox support by SharePoint."

Link to Original Source
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ISO publishes final Open XML specification

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 5 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "ISO/IEC 29500:2008, better known as Office Open XML, is now a published ISO International Standard. Major changes since last public drafts include splitting the standard into "strict conformance" and "transitional conformance" parts, with all the Microsoft Office compatibility hacks going into the latter, "for Office Open XML consumers and producers that comply to the transitional conformance category ... provide support for legacy Microsoft Office applications". The complete standard, including the transitional part, is still rather unwieldy at 7,228 pages; of those, the transitional elements take up only 1,475 pages.

In addition, the ISO press release explicitly references something called "Microsoft Office 2008" at least one time. Presumably, it would be a Microsoft Office release fully compliant with the newly released specification in its final form; however, there haven't been any announcements from Microsoft about a product named "Office 2008" yet."

Link to Original Source
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Exploits generated autpmatically from patches

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 5 years ago

shutdown -p now writes "A group of researchers wrote a paper (PDF) on automatic generation of exploits from security patches. It works by performing flow analysis on the code that is changed by the code to find the boundary conditions that lead to vulnerability in an unpatched version. It's not just theory, either: they have successfully generated exploits for 5 known vulnerabilities in Microsoft products using their algorithm. The authors note that a successful attack using this method is particularly likely when vendor deliberately delays releasing security patches to the general public, to push them in a single bundle on a regular schedule — as is the case with Windows Update and its infamous Patch Tuesday."
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Journals

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Contact me

shutdown -p now shutdown -p now writes  |  more than 3 years ago

If you want to contact me without spamming article discussions (i.e. if you're new here), just reply to this post.

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