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Comments

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New US Airstrikes In Iraq Intended to Protect Important Dam

siddesu Re:Get used to it (215 comments)

It is quite clear what the OP's point is, unless you're very obtuse. Also, the 'failed state' reference is obviously about 'democratic' Iraq, and not the superpower in question.

about three weeks ago
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Taking the Ice Bucket Challenge With Liquid Nitrogen

siddesu tag this crap as idle, please (182 comments)

i don't need to see it in my news for nerds stream.

about a month ago
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Oregon Suing Oracle Over Obamacare Site, But Still Needs Oracle's Help

siddesu Re:normal (116 comments)

I believe that's what they mean by "vendor lock-in". It isn't "normal" in the normal meaning of the word, although it is the norm.

about a month ago
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Finland's Nuclear Plant Start Delayed Again

siddesu Re:Arevas failure (130 comments)

This is all just word games, really. Their construction process was on-time, they just got an unplanned interrupt.

Yes, yours are playing word games here, because you invent a new definition of 'schedule' and 'delay'. However, in the real world a 'schedule' is 'a plan of intended events and times' and a 'delay' is 'a period of time by which something is late or postponed'. We measure the 'delay' by comparing it to the 'intended times' that appear in the 'schedule'. According to these definitions we can observe the following two facts:

  • 1. The Tianshan plant is two years behind its original schedule
  • The Sanmen NPP, where a different type of reactor is being built, is also more than a year behind its original schedule.

I.e. you're wrong, and the Chinese experience the same problems building nuclear reactors as anyone else does. And the problems are massive delays and massive cost overruns. Incidentally, this has been a typical feature of the nuclear industry throughout its existence.

about a month ago
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Finland's Nuclear Plant Start Delayed Again

siddesu Re:Arevas failure (130 comments)

all it says is that the articles you linked had the wrong estimate in them

Like I said already, I do not refer to articles, but to the original plans of the Chinese operator and the contractors at the time of the start of the construction. For some reason, you keep denying the fact that Tianshan was supposed to enter service in 2013 and believe that it is still 'on schedule' although it isn't. Normally, this mental state is referred to as 'delusion'.

Once they have a few units built, you'll see the estimates stabilize.

In other words, they won't be able to do it "on-time" and "on-budget" until "estimates stabilize". Like I said, if you accept that delays are a part of the schedule, you'll always be on schedule. This is not how schedules work, though.

so you can be pretty sure they're watching the project with a microscope.

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven.

about a month ago
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Finland's Nuclear Plant Start Delayed Again

siddesu Re:Arevas failure (130 comments)

Chinese don't do

I mean to write "can do", obviously.

about a month ago
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Finland's Nuclear Plant Start Delayed Again

siddesu Re:Arevas failure (130 comments)

Then that estimate was quite simply wrong.

Yep. As I said above, you're wrong to think Chinese don't do things on-time and on-budget. As a matter of fact, you're even wronger, as they can't even make proper estimates. I don't want to contemplate how safe their plants will end up being. Of course, in the environmental mess that is China, a Chernobyl or two should not make much difference.

about a month ago
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Finland's Nuclear Plant Start Delayed Again

siddesu Re:Arevas failure (130 comments)

You also need to keep in mind that 46 months was the planned construction time, not when it enters commercial service.

Original Taishan NPP plan schedule called for entering commercial service in 2013, full stop.

So if you consider the ripple that Fukushima sent into the world of nuclear reactor construction projects, Taishan is indeed roughly on schedule.

Yes, if you don't consider the delays, any project will be 'roughly on schedule'.

about a month ago
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Finland's Nuclear Plant Start Delayed Again

siddesu Re:Arevas failure (130 comments)

Chinese aren't building the very same reactors on-time and on-budget. The Taishan NPP your article is talking about is already two years behind the original schedule -- it was supposed to go online in 2013, but it won't at least until 2015. If that's the last word.

about a month ago
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

siddesu Re:The key bit (542 comments)

In short the position is that if you have freedom you will abuse it.

It is a universally acknowledged government problem. Governments are known to have built 'free speech zones' to deal with the issue.

about a month ago
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Watch UK Inventor Colin Furze Survive a Fireworks Blast In a Metal Suit

siddesu Re:Idle (54 comments)

I have no idea, but I don't care. Now I finally know how they built the Tin Woodman.

about a month ago
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Chernobyl's Sarcophagus, Redux

siddesu Re:So Funny! (121 comments)

The "gas that mixes with the air" is not that much of a problem nowadays, the concrete will mostly cover that. What's leaking from below, on the other hand...

about 5 months ago
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Star Cluster Ejected From Galaxy At 2,000,000 MPH

siddesu Re:Velocity (133 comments)

would we notice the effects of such an ejection?

Effects will depend on the differences of acceleration of different parts of the cluster. Because the speed has probably increased over many millenia, and because it is still a cluster, they were most likely very hard to observe.

about 4 months ago
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Star Cluster Ejected From Galaxy At 2,000,000 MPH

siddesu Re:Velocity (133 comments)

2 mil miles per hour is something like 1000 km/s. Considering that the escape velocity on the surface of the Sun is something like 600km/s that's not pedestrian at all.

about 4 months ago
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Physics Students Devise Concept For Star Wars-Style Deflector Shields

siddesu Re:Lore (179 comments)

Most of the 'stormtroopers can't hit shit' hate comes from the insignificant number of Ewoks that they killed. And I understand that hate.

about 5 months ago
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Report: 99 Percent of New Mobile Threats Target Android

siddesu Re:Droid does what iDon't: AIDE (269 comments)

s/for many apps/instead of writing many apps/ doh.

about 5 months ago
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Report: 99 Percent of New Mobile Threats Target Android

siddesu Re:Droid does what iDon't: AIDE (269 comments)

Actually, for many apps, you can always use Tasker or one of its free clones. How can you do what Tasker does on iOS?

about 5 months ago
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Graphene Could Be Dangerous To Humans and the Environment

siddesu Re:Grey goo (135 comments)

Probably because the original scifi concept is that gray goo is not lifelike -- it is very simple, and won't evolve, just dissolve everything into ever more gray goo. Or somesuch.The nanodes that can only be killed by the Martian defense systems, on the other hand...

about 5 months ago
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Decommissioning Nuclear Plants Costing Far More Than Expected

siddesu Re:First.... (288 comments)

Who the hell is moding you up as insightful?

The people who can read a text and understand the argument that is presented. It looks like you're not one of them.

about 5 months ago
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Decommissioning Nuclear Plants Costing Far More Than Expected

siddesu Re:First.... (288 comments)

Gen 4 reactors will happily run in a way that it effectively reprocesses its own waste. It's also got passive safety and the resulting waste (which at this point really isn't fuel) has a half-life well short of the hundred years.

They are also fictional. We'll be able to judge how well they operate and how they reprocess own waste when we see one operating safely for some time.

about 5 months ago

Submissions

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GMO food proved almost harmless by a huge volume of data

siddesu siddesu writes  |  about two weeks ago

siddesu (698447) writes "A new research suggests there are no ill effects from GMO ingredients for the billions of animals fed for slaughter. In particular, data on livestock productivity and health were collated from publicly available sources from 1983, before the introduction of GE crops in 1996, and subsequently through 2011, a period with high levels of predominately GE animal feed. These field data sets representing over 100 billion animals following the introduction of GE crops did not reveal unfavorable or perturbed trends in livestock health and productivity. Anti-GMO luddites expected to announce that animals are slaughtered too early to tell later today."
Link to Original Source
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A second group of Fukushima residents are allowed to return to evacuation zone.

siddesu siddesu writes  |  about a month and a half ago

siddesu (698447) writes "A group of people who lived within the 20-kilometer restricted zone surrounding the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant are asked to return home, the second time the "right of return" has been granted, despite opposition to the government decision by residents and medical researchers."
Link to Original Source
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Japanese "cyber crime" suspect arrested for petting a stray cat

siddesu siddesu writes  |  about a year and a half ago

siddesu (698447) writes "A man was arrested this morning in Tokyo because he was videotaped approaching a famous stray cat in the popular tourist destination of Enoshima near Tokyo.

The animal was used some months ago to deliver (via an SD card strapped to its leash) a message ridiculing the cyber crime unit of the Japanese police for their failure to apprehend a "hacker", who posted "threatening messages" to several popular boards.

The investigation of the pranks since October last year has so far resulted in four arrests of innocent people."

Link to Original Source
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Room Temperature Superconductivity Found in Graphite Grains

siddesu siddesu writes  |  about 2 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "Here's an interesting recipe. Take a spoonful of graphite powder and stir it into a glass of water. Leave for 24 hours at room temperature and then filter the powder. Finally, bake overnight at 100 degrees C and allow to cool.

And voila! A material that superconducts at over 300 kelvin--room temperature. At least that's the claim today from Pablo Esquinazi and buddies at the University of Leipzig in Germany."

Link to Original Source
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Fukushima One Year Later: Reality Check FAQ

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 2 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "The Asahi Shimbun has published a rather thorough and readable Q&A article, which is addressing many frequently asked questions about the consequences of the radioactive pollution that followed the accident.

Answers are given by Mariko Takahashi, a writer with the paper, who is, according to the introduction, "well-versed" in the issues at hand."

Link to Original Source
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Electricity rationing in Tokyo

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 3 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "The TV in Tokyo is just announcing a schedule for electricity blackouts to last from tomorrow until the end of April.

Practically all suburbs of Tokyo will be affected by the blackouts. The 23 districts of central Tokyo seem to be exempt for the moment, but if supply is not sufficient, blackouts are possible.

Electricity will be interrupted for about 3 hours a day in each area."

Link to Original Source
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File organization - how do you do it?

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 3 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "After 30 years of being around computers, I have, like everyone else, amassed a huge amount of files in huge amount of formats about a huge amount of topics. And it isn't only me — the family has now a ton of data that they want managed and easily accessible.

Keeping all that information in order has always been a pain, but it has gone harder as the storage has increased and people and files and sizes have multiplied.

What do you folks use to keep your odd terabyte of document, picture, video and code files organized — that is, relatively uniformly tagged, versioned, searchable and ultimately findable, without 50 duplicates over your 50 devices and without typing arcane commands in a terminal window?

I found this discussion from 2003 and this tangentially relevant post from 2006. How have things changed for you in 2011?

And how satisfied is your extended family with the solution you have unleashed upon them?"
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Apple bans online sales in Japan

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 4 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "Japanese big retail stores were ordered a week or so ago to stop selling Apple products online. The comments in the Japanese business newspapers suggest that Apple believes online shopping adds an aura of "cheapness" to their products, but killing the competition of the Apple store has surely been considered as well. As of today, most of the largest retailers have notices on their Apple catalog pages that ask you to kindly visit the shop if you want to acquire a piece of magic. It seems that for the moment the campaign is aimed at the big fish, as smaller shops still seem to carry and sell Apple items.

(Link goes to a google translate of the commentary of cnet japan, this is the original in Japanese)."

Link to Original Source
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Water found on a Saturn moon.

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 4 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "Scientists working on the Cassini mission (thttp://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/index.cfm) have found evidence of liquid water on the planet's icy moon Enceladus, suggesting the possibility of life below its surface and further limiting parking availability in the solar system."
Link to Original Source
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Quantum effects behind photosynthesis efficiency

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 4 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "Wired has a fascinating story about a recent discovery that sheds light on the quantum physics mechanisms behind the efficiency of photosynthesis. Antenna proteins appear to "use" quantum effects to route energy almost without loss from photon-sensitive molecules to nearby reaction-center proteins, which convert it to cell-driving charges. As a bonus, the article provides a car analogy."
Link to Original Source
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A proof of life on Mars - at last?

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 4 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "Compelling new data that chemical and fossil evidence of ancient microbial life on Mars was carried to Earth in a Martian meteorite is being elevated to a higher plane by the same NASA team which made the initial discovery 13 years ago. Time to bow to our Marsian overlords?"
Link to Original Source
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Herschel telescope sees first light

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 5 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "Herschel, the infra-red space telescope, opened its eyes on 14 June 2009, precisely one month after the launch. It carried out test observations labeled a 'sneak preview' making use of time initially allocated to 'thermal stabilization', following a request to attempt producing an early observational result. Here's the first pictures and more."
Link to Original Source
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Japanese researchers read images from human brain

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 5 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "TV Asahi reports (video attached to the news clip, all in Japanese) that a Japanese neuroscience research institute has read images as they are processed by the brain for the fist time in history. The video shows pictures being shown to a subject and the reading of the images in the brain by a scanner developed by the institute. The researchers expect to perfect the technology so that it reads dreams and images in the near future.

(The scoop is a rough translation of the news article)

The site of the institute: http://www.cns.atr.jp/indexE.html
Video: mms://wmt-od.stream.ne.jp/tv-asahi/tv-asahia/news/0703/wmt/20081211-181211004-563-300.wmv?now=20081211185155_300k"

Link to Original Source
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EU police prepares to "remote search" comp

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 5 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "BBC mentions briefly that EU police will perform remote searches of suspect computers as a part of an EU plan to tackle hi-tech crime. "The strategy encourages the much needed operational cooperation and information exchange between the Member States," said EC vice-president Jacques Barrot in a statement. Now, that is a crime prevention I can subscribe to."
Link to Original Source
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2025 NIC predicts multipolar and dangerous world

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 5 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "BBC and other news agencies report that the most recent National Intelligence Council report suggests that by 2025 the influence of the US over the world will diminish, new powers — notably Brazil, India and China will emerge, and with the onset of global warming and new superpowers with diverging political values the world will become a more dangerous place, prone to conflicts in which nukes may be used. This is a much gloomier outlook on the world compared to the report from only two years ago. Dig that shelter and stock up on ammo where legal.

Link to the PDF report."

Link to Original Source
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skype helps chinese authorities snoop on messages

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 5 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "For all people like me, who think skype is sort of secure against eavesdropping, here is a reminder from the real world:

"Citizen Lab, a group of Canadian human-rights activists and computer security researchers, has discovered a huge surveillance system in China that monitors and archives certain Internet text conversations that include politically charged words.

The system tracks text messages sent by customers of Tom-Skype, a joint venture between a Chinese wireless operator and eBay, the Web auctioneer that owns Skype, an online phone and text messaging service."

More is available from the BBC and the NYT, as well as on the site of Citizen Lab.

Citizen Lab:http://www.citizenlab.org/

BBC story:http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7649761.stm"

Link to Original Source
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brain evolution similar to hardware development

siddesu siddesu writes  |  more than 6 years ago

siddesu (698447) writes "A new research by the Sanger institute suggests that the widely accepted view that brain power is a function only of size and that nerve cells are similar accross species is incorrect, and that complex brains depend not only on the number of neurons and connection, but also on the complexity and capabilities of its neurons.

The study compares proteins found in synapses accross many species and finds that in simpler organisms not only the brain size is different, but the number of proteins in their neurons is also significantly lower than that of animals with complex brains or humans.

This suggests that complex brains need more complex "hardware", and that the evolution from simple sensory "components" (as found in the various yeasts) to the complex neurons that build the human brain is similar to the development of computer hardware."

Link to Original Source

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