Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Twin Probes Crash Into the Moon

sixtyeight Headline (79 comments)

Was not prepared for that headline this morning.

Who subscribed me to Slashdot After Dark?

about a year and a half ago
top

Researchers Build Water Soluble Chips

sixtyeight Re:It always sells as a health benefiting technolo (52 comments)

I'm not sure it's prudent to wait on the primary beneficiary of a poor educational system to overhaul that system.

A good education can be had by researching online, but the value of this is regularly naysaid by internet trolls. Counterintuitively, the public seem to put much stock in their opinion of it. The result is that "everyone knows" information cannot be trusted, simply because it can be found predominantly online.

about a year and a half ago
top

Researchers Build Water Soluble Chips

sixtyeight Re:It always sells as a health benefiting technolo (52 comments)

That occurred to me as well.

Perhaps people will get their governments under control, so that the People decide what gets researched... and the government must settle for the scraps.

about a year and a half ago
top

Stay Home When You're Sick!

sixtyeight Re:Deadlines don't change (670 comments)

You're quite correct.

And when someone who's sick goes into work anyway, and transmits their cold and flu to others who then need to take sick days, the deadlines of those other employees don't change either.

The viral recipient employees appreciate that fact very easily. It's a wonder that the viral originators, not to mention the employers, don't.

It's such an antisocial workplace statement to make. "I'm not rearranging my work schedule because I'm sick - five of the rest of you guys can rearrange yours because I'm sick. Enjoy." That this unspoken statement doesn't make it onto many peoples' radars appears to be a testament to how many people don't have their moral compass active on a consistent basis.

about a year and a half ago
top

Hagfish Slime Could Make Super-Strong Clothes

sixtyeight Re:Marketing Hurdle of the Century (82 comments)

Just give it a brand name. Heck, it worked for Twinkies and some people even ate those.

Ocean Silk could work quite well, though it would probably have a more dissociative name - Rymplon, for example.

about a year and a half ago
top

Wiki Weapon Project Test-Fires a (Partly) 3D-Printed Rifle

sixtyeight Re:Counterintuitive (289 comments)

Wasn't aware that I did.

Stereotypes don't shift due to facts. They shift due to perceptions. Trolls and other internet shills have been relying on that for decades.

about a year and a half ago
top

Wiki Weapon Project Test-Fires a (Partly) 3D-Printed Rifle

sixtyeight Counterintuitive (289 comments)

I wonder what having techie types with superior firepower as the societal norm will do to the prevalent stereotype.

about a year and a half ago
top

Confidential Police Documents Found In Confetti At Macy's Parade

sixtyeight Hmm... (180 comments)

If I had access to confidential police records, including undercover cops, and wanted to sell it, I might arrange a distribution method such as this.

It's a good thing that nobody with significant amounts of money has an interest in determining the identities of undercover cops.

about a year and a half ago
top

Minecraft Reality App Arrives For iOS, Brings Your Creations Into the Real World

sixtyeight Wait for it... (25 comments)

So, next is checking into 4Square from your Minecraft bunker.

about a year and a half ago
top

Senate Bill Rewrite Lets Feds Read Your E-mail Without Warrants

sixtyeight Re:Reality (403 comments)

The underlying enabling fallacy the public has accepted here is that their political representatives have the lawful authority to do anything within their office that does not contravene the laws - and of course, they write the laws.

This deviates from the structure of American government as established, in two ways. In office, the authority of said political representatives must derive from the People. What powers and authorities the People did not vest in the federal government remain with the People, or with the states respectively.

Secondly, politicians do not make law anymore. The draft and enact legislation ("legis", legal), and this term refers to the paperwork and bureaucratic process only. Legislation and legal refer to that which has the form and appearance of law, without necessarily having the substance. Was everything dated correctly? Submitted to the correct parties? Turned in on time? Did it receive the proper number of Yea votes? Great, it's legal. But in order to be law as well, it must have the proper derivation of authority - and that must come from the People. Just as governments cannot give anyone money that they have not taken from someone else, so also can they not exercise powers, authorities and privileges that were not vested in them by the People. By default, rights belong to the People. This is the purpose of founding documents: To specifically allocate powers and authorities to governments, and to define their nature and limitations.

By contrast, the vast majority of what American politicians do today is analogous to malware. And like malware, it successfully evades detection because the People, by and large, have not updated their detection algorithms in a very long time.

As the political malware increasingly bogs down the system's runtime, the People have begun to do so. The results will be easy to extrapolate from the computer analogy.

about a year and a half ago
top

Do Recreational Drugs Help Programmers?

sixtyeight Re:What? (878 comments)

The estimation by non-users that drug use produces a sudden, drastic and permanent brain deterioration in the users seems to have been unrealistically amplified by society, in my experience.

The estimation can cause non-users to discredit the assessments of users on general principle, which of course leaves their assessments the only valid ones remaining - for them, anyway. The article's question isn't likely to be resolvable within a context like that, because the typical result is just marked social division between users and non-users. I suppose the two social factions will just have to resign themselves to arguing the matter with no possible chance of resolution.

That estimation also produces other resultants, too: A societal justification for keeping most drugs on the black market, with all the private and government programs that drug money is used to fund. And for users, it keeps them reliant on a distribution network, at the prices they set, and limits both their quality assurance and selection of substances. Additionally, it should be noted that if you're a major drug distribution network with a lot of the say about what specific types of drugs become readily available within a country, you have the ability to partially shape the mindset, mood, energy level and attitude of a given generation.
The ability to influence that can be intensely useful for, say, politicians.

With all that potential incentive attached to it, that common estimation is beginning to seem less and less innocuous and naturally-occurring. When that estimation rubs off from "society", where - specifically - do people get it from? Ah, that's right. It's the slant on medical research data of prolonged, hard use of certain drugs, provided to us at an early age by government-controlled public schools and government-funded anti-drug campaigns in the media.

But it's not as if there could be a hidden agenda at work there.

about a year and a half ago
top

Google Bans Online Anonymity While Patenting It

sixtyeight Re:Oh, Google is fine with anonymity... (188 comments)

Short answer: "It's a risk to give access to your identifying information to people on the internet. Unless it's us."

about 2 years ago
top

Bring On the Decentralized Social Networking

sixtyeight Re:One question (238 comments)

So the geeks would be the early adopters, and everyone else would probably wait until Facebook inevitably turned the thumbscrews on the users enough for them to become dissatisfied.

about 2 years ago
top

Bring On the Decentralized Social Networking

sixtyeight Re:One question (238 comments)

Sure, the geeky masses. WordStar. Spreadsheets. In other words, business needs at home and in the small offices.

For personal use, the geek stigma was only overcome once people found they could play decent computer games.

about 2 years ago
top

Bring On the Decentralized Social Networking

sixtyeight Re:One question (238 comments)

Thirty years ago, the idea that non-geeks would ever start using computers themselves seemed absurd.

Forty years ago, the idea that people - rather than corporations and governments - would use computers themselves seemed absurd.

about 2 years ago
top

Photo Reveals UK Plan: "Assange To Be Arrested Under All Circumstances"

sixtyeight Re:Solution (847 comments)

For that matter, I wonder how much Assange's appearance itself can be altered.

Suppose the embassy were to play host to a convention with a large number of people?

about 2 years ago
top

Photo Reveals UK Plan: "Assange To Be Arrested Under All Circumstances"

sixtyeight Re:Why bother? (847 comments)

On the nose.

I'm amazed the British government is making such a PR debacle of this by pursuing it so publicly. Surely Assange would be scheduled for a heart attack in a year or two instead, and leave it at that?

about 2 years ago
top

Photo Reveals UK Plan: "Assange To Be Arrested Under All Circumstances"

sixtyeight Solution (847 comments)

Ecuadorean diplomats should now regularly ship moving crates, boxes, novelty oversized cakes and so forth out of the embassy on a daily basis.

about 2 years ago
top

Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing), Gun Control, and Patent Law

sixtyeight Re:We shouldn't ban 'things' but uses (380 comments)

You unintentionally expose a great proof for the concept that enabling us to exercise freedom is not the agenda of this kind of legislation.

Banning ownership of specific 'things' is enforceable across the board, which is the appeal. Even though it overreaches into legitimate uses, politicians haven't been finding that a concern. But they should. We never gave them the authority to pass legislation which encroaches upon our rights. However, this now happens routinely today.

Now if only there were some cryptic clue as to their actual agenda. Because it certainly isn't upholding our rights.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

sixtyeight hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

sixtyeight has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...