×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Netflix Cracks Down On VPN and Proxy "Pirates"

skegg Re:encouraging piracy (437 comments)

especially annoying when the software is distributed as download so there is no real answer as to why there is a 50-100% markup.

Some software companies claim it's due to internationalisation expenses (making an EN/AU version) which I think is fair - I imagine teams of university academics, linguists and anthropologists labouring over translating the EN/US XML file into EN/AU.

about three weeks ago
top

Uber Pushing For Patent On Surge Pricing

skegg Re: not original (190 comments)

I suspect the answer lies somewhere in between.

What about India -- under threat of allowing foreign drugs to be replicated without paying patents -- slashing the price they'll pay for said pharmaceuticals?
Surely this is an example of the market not working? (The final price is not the result of supply intersecting demand.)

Of course, it's very important that the pharmaceutical companies remain profitable so they can continue their R&D.
Though ... I don't think there's any imminent cause for concern

about a month ago
top

Comcast's Lobbyists Hand Out VIP Cards To Skip the Customer Service Wait

skegg Bloody Innovative (131 comments)

Disgusting, but very innovative way to generate a reality-distortion field around their true customer service.

about a month ago
top

Judge: It's OK For Cops To Create Fake Instagram Accounts

skegg Re:Not seeing the issue here (209 comments)

sticking to those 2 sets of four words will ALWAYS be to your advantage and not sticking to them is NEVER to your advantage.

:-(

about a month ago
top

Judge: It's OK For Cops To Create Fake Instagram Accounts

skegg Re:Not seeing the issue here (209 comments)

Use that while you can.

In NSW, the right to silence was dealt a blow similar to laws they have in the UK.

In a nutshell, the new law "encourages" those arrested to open their hearts to the police, and yap away.
Because anything not offered to the police can potentially subsequently be deemed inadmissible in your trial.

This was opposed by civil rights groups and even the LEGAL PROFESSION ... but objections fell on deaf ears.

about a month ago
top

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

skegg Re:Sure... (343 comments)

No, you're wrong. *Accountants* consider security to be a cost centre.

If we extend your analogy, then entire companies are profit centres, including the cleaners. (Because if the place was a mess with rats everywhere, then business couldn't be conducted.)

The decision to classify something as a Cost Centre or Profit Centre is an accounting one.
I mean, sheesh

"A cost centre is part of an organization that does not produce direct profit"

(emphasis added)

about a month ago
top

Heathrow Plane In Near Miss With Drone

skegg Re:No bigger than ... (325 comments)

So we need more regulation to protect the profit of giant corporation? When they fly their plane over my house my property lose value.

Lemme get this straight:
you're concerned about aircraft noise reducing the value of your property, but refuse to accept regulations that may (just may) prevent an aircraft from falling onto you while you're sleeping.

O ... kay ...

about 2 months ago
top

Heathrow Plane In Near Miss With Drone

skegg Re:Panic! (325 comments)

10kg aircraft "threatens" airbus a320. Sure.

Yes, it IS a threat. And a responsible person wouldn't be flying these things where they can put other people's lives at risk.

Might've been a bird, and those don't come with radio control.

Yet airports DO take measures to discourage birds from being in their vicinity. Now, most birds generally don't fear fines and prison sentences, so the measures usually take the form of: (i) changing the environment, to make it less appealing -- removing surrounding trees, food sources, etc; (ii) trained birds of prey; (iii) sound-generating devices.

Why do we hear about incidents with drones but not about incidents with RC aircraft?

RC aircraft have historically been used by a small number of (responsible) hobbyists. Drones are becoming more widespread, and their owners are starting to include idiots.

It's a shame that some idiots are behaving this way. I say release the falcons on them!

about 2 months ago
top

Apple's Luxembourg Tax Deals

skegg Re:Good for them (158 comments)

Up until about a decade or so ago in Australia, some clever private individuals established companies and worked their 9 - 5 job through the company, enjoying much lower tax rates and other such benefits of corporate law (shifting losses to other years, etc).

The Australian Tax Office stepped-in and declared if you look like a private individual, walk like a private individual and quack like a private individual ... you're a private individual and will pay tax at the appropriate rate. You'll also receive a fine for trying to be clever.

So clearly, the government is able to crack down on those who try to be clever and follow the LETTER of the law but not the SPIRIT of the law. Unfortunately, the government is very SELECTIVE when deciding where to act.

about 3 months ago
top

Apple's Luxembourg Tax Deals

skegg Re:Simple fix (158 comments)

Knowing that the tax laws allow large corporations to get a refund of prior year taxes when they have a loss I asked my accountant about it. His response was that it would cost far more to file the paperwork than what the refund would be.

This here is the real zinger.

Almost everything that these large corporations do which results in them realising such lower effective tax rates -- lower than small businesses, and lower than even lowly paid employees -- is LEGAL, however EXPENSIVE to achieve.

Let's say the professional advice, off-shore entities, and expenses for submitting paperwork to government departments costs a million dollars a year (I plucked that number out of the air): a company would need revenue many times that to make it worth all the effort. So existing laws -- which make such behaviour legal -- favour larger corporations.

It's the same with family trusts in Australia: they're legal financial instruments that "coincidentally" allow people to decimate their income tax obligations. Unfortunately, they're also a little costly to establish and maintain, so only wealthy people end-up using them.

NONE of these laws are by chance ... I believe they're DELIBERATELY DESIGNED to benefit the wealthy.

about 3 months ago
top

Australian Post Office Opens Mail Forwarding Warehouse In the USA

skegg Re:Other prisons are the same (142 comments)

I can vouch for his comment that having ancestors who arrived as convicts DOES give one bragging rights in Australia.

about 3 months ago
top

China Completes Its First Lunar Return Mission

skegg Re:Welcome to 1970, China! (109 comments)

Wrong: the specs are still present, and much of the institutional knowledge is still present.

What the US lacks is the financial will however, rest-assured that both the US and Russia could hop back into the space race whenever they chose. It would hurt financially, but they could do it.

These countries are choosing not to spend as much on space programmes as they once did. Back against the wall, they could switch priorities.

I wish people would stop playing-out their fantasy that former world leaders (US, UK, Russia, France) are wounded giants with buzzards surrounding them ... they pack a mean punch and will continue to for some time.

about 3 months ago
top

Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

skegg Re:It's sad (427 comments)

I agree: Google is outright "aggressive" when attempting to capture user data.

And they employ numerous techniques:
    - persistent nagging - incessantly asking for additional data/permissions despite consistently declined in the past
    - trying to capitalise on user error - making it easy to sign-up for services you don't actually want (convert to Google+)
    - and now, forcing manufacturers to add services many people don't actually want (why do we have app stores, anyway, if apps are pre-loaded?)
    - making permissions generic - allowing more aggressive apps to be waved through
    - not allowing granular permissions - anyone remember this?

about 3 months ago
top

Supreme Court Ruling Relaxes Warrant Requirements For Home Searches

skegg Re:Frog is boiling.... (500 comments)

Personally, I'm more concerned with how they define "occupant". Is it anybody that happens to be in the house at that time? Do children count?

I'm sure that thought already crossed the collective mind of the police department and judges ...

about a year ago
top

Supreme Court Ruling Relaxes Warrant Requirements For Home Searches

skegg Re:Sure (500 comments)

Good point. And thankfully, litigation is completely free and fair.

You don't need to spend thousands on a lawyer. Nor do you have to take time off work to meet with said lawyer and go to court.
Plus, you're guaranteed to get an equitable judge; one who isn't on a first-name-basis with representatives of the police department.

I wish I lived in your world ...

about a year ago
top

Anonymous Slovenia Claims To Have Hacked the FBI and Posted Emails To Pastebin

skegg Re:Sensitive information? (152 comments)

As for the other info, I fail to see how my wedding date, educational history, etc. would be particularly useful to a killer.

The day after your wedding anniversary, your assassin could ask your wife what type of flowers you bought her and where you took her for dinner.

She'd become so irate that you forgot the anniversary that she'd do the job for him.

about a year ago
top

Yep, People Are Still Using '123456' and 'Password' As Passwords In 2014

skegg Re:rubber-necker woot-woot (276 comments)

And never get into a car with them.

1 year,6 days
top

Pirate Bay Founder's Custody Extended to February 5th

skegg Re:Well yeah (127 comments)

no, they just locked him up alone

And you're being particularly obtuse. Solitary confinement has historically been used as a way of punishing prisoners, and only ever for short periods.
X0563511 is correct: the state should foot the bill of posting a guard at his door.

Further reading: Solitary Confinement
The opening paragraph says it all.

1 year,19 days
top

Firewall Company Palo Alto Buys Stealthy Startup Formed By Ex-NSAers

skegg Re:I don't think so. (102 comments)

Wallah!

It's "voilà".

He could have been quoting Arabic ... in which case that word fits quite well.
(However I agree he probably meant "voila".)

1 year,22 days

Submissions

top

Accessing One's Own Metadata

skegg skegg writes  |  about 4 months ago

skegg (666571) writes "Frustrated journalist Ben Grubb has documented his attempts at gaining access to his own metadata from his carrier. "After more than a year of phone calls and emails and a private mediation session, it still hasn't released the information or answered my one key question satisfactorily: the government can access my Telstra metadata, so why can't I?"
top

Contents of footballer's phone, iPad downloaded by customs

skegg skegg writes  |  about a year and a half ago

skegg (666571) writes "Revelations of performance enhancing drug use amongst some Australian athletes has brought this subject to centre stage in recent years. Amendments to legislation now give the government anti-doping body broad powers to 'compel' suspected individuals to hand over, well, anything related to an investigation. And when a well known football player recently passed through customs it appears that just happened, with the sportsman allegedly having the contents of his phone and iPad downloaded."
top

Major Australian Retailer Accused of Selling Infec

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 3 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "Dick Smith, a major Australian electronics retailer, is being accused of regularly selling used hard drives as new. Particularly disturbing is the claim that at least one drive contained malware-infested pirated movies, causing the unlucky buyer significant data loss. Apparently the Fair Trading Commissioner will be conducting an investigation."
Link to Original Source
top

Husband ordered to pay wife for lack of sex

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 2 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "A court in France has ordered a man to pay 10,000 euro in damages to his long-frustrated ex-wife after he failed in his marriage "duties" by withholding sex from her for years. Is this every Slashdotter's dream — court-mandated sex — or a nightmare waiting to happen?"
Link to Original Source
top

Global Mall Operator Starts Reading License Plates

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 3 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "Westfield Group, one of the largest shopping centre (mall) operators in the world, has launched a find-my-car iPhone app. The system uses a series of license plate reading cameras dotted throughout their multi-level car parks. Westfield said police could also use it to find stolen or unregistered vehicles. (Hello, slippery slope.) Initially launched in just one Sydney centre, it will be rolled-out to others if the trial is successful."
Link to Original Source
top

Camera Fails to Record Killing at Sydney Airport

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 3 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "Despite the millions spent on security and the clamp down on our rights, a security camera at Sydney Airport failed to record a brawl in which a man was bashed to death with a bollard. In fact, the jury has heard evidence from an airport employee that the camera had been out of order for "at least two years". Security theatre at its finest?"
Link to Original Source
top

Outgoing Government Shredding Secrets

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 3 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "With the incumbent party expected to suffer a landslide defeat in the upcoming elections, The Daily Telegraph reports: "Thousands of politically sensitive documents and computer files are being destroyed by NSW Labor Government staffers intent on leaving no damaging traces of its 16 years in power." The Telegraph also reveals insights from a NSW State Records report covering best practices for making records go away, including: shredding, crushing, incinerating, chemical recycling, and more. Who would have thought a government could be so efficient?"
Link to Original Source
top

Public Fears Hinder Australian Photographers

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "A renowned Sydney photographer says spontaneous images in public spaces are becoming increasingly difficult to capture and that fears about paedophilia and terrorism are largely to blame."
Link to Original Source
top

Oz Gov to Spend $AUD467m on E-Health Records

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "During tonight's budget reading, the Australian Treasurer announced plans to spend $AUD467 million (about $USD418 million) introducing electronic health records for all Australians. Participation will be optional, and individuals will control who can access and update their records. For now. So what's the latest scoop regarding e-health records in your country? Should Australians embrace this initiative or fight it? Are there any measures we should put in place sooner rather than later?"
top

Australian Internet Filter Extended

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 5 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "Despite stories of its net filter backdown it seems the Australian Government's censorship plans are alive and well ... with a little something extra. The Government is now promising to use its internet censorship regime to block websites hosting and selling video games that are not suitable for 15 year olds. From the article: "Colin Jacobs, spokesman for the online users' lobby group Electronic Frontiers Australia, said the Government clearly went far beyond any mandate it had from the public to help parents deal with cyber-safety ... 'This is confirmation that the scope of the mandatory censorship scheme will keep on creeping'"."
top

Are we ready for a cashless society?

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 7 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "Following a security scare, a major Australian bank cancelled thousands of credit cards belonging to its customers. The article mentions one customer unable to leave a store as she spent 40 minutes on the phone trying to sort out the mess. Do incidents like this teach us anything about preparing for a cashless society? Is a purely cashless society even possible by today's technology standards?"
Link to Original Source
top

skegg skegg writes  |  more than 8 years ago

skegg (666571) writes "In this AP article, a Singapore teenager has pleaded guilty to tapping into a neighbor's wireless Internet network. What makes this story interesting is that the judge asked if he would be willing to enlist early for the mandatory national service "as a way to stay out of mischief" ... the teenager agreed. Is this a fair use of national service?"

Journals

skegg has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?