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U.S. Gas Stations Vulnerable To Internet Attacks

skids Re:price hack? (99 comments)

I'm sure some high frequency trader could figure out some sleazy way to make a buck off it, though.

2 days ago
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Regular Exercise Not Enough To Make Up For Sitting All Day

skids Re:KILL two birds with one stone (348 comments)

Yep, smokes and trips to the soda machine for a diet cola keep my legs from getting cramped. Also sometimes keeps my coworkers from getting verbally raked and expells unwanted company from out of my office.

5 days ago
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Regular Exercise Not Enough To Make Up For Sitting All Day

skids Re:Excellent! (348 comments)

Though, it would be even nicer to get hazard pay for it.

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can I Trust Android Rooting Tools?

skids Re:Benefit of the doubt: wake on RTC (184 comments)

Last time I looked at that feature it was a smattering of different BIOS implementations. Nothing standardized, and I'm not entirely sure M$ has kept their support for setting it from inside the OS intact. PITA.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can I Trust Android Rooting Tools?

skids Re: Rooting - (184 comments)

Well, the lead plaintiff can be awarded a significant amount by the court for his/her troubles. It is pretty much entirely up to the court, however.

about a week ago
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New Collaborative Project Wants to Systematize Complex Problem Solving Online

skids Re:If all you have is a hammer... (42 comments)

Yep. Wikipedia is successful because it takes input without an account, wich gets you hooked enough to actually create an account and also lets spam die a quicker death because even aloof bystanders can kill it. That and of course version control make reverts easier than spam. Like a few others that have burst on the scene with hopes of being "wikipedia for X", this site won't be very successful (unless its intended entirely as a credential collector.)

about a week ago
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AMD Catalyst Is the Broken Wheel For Linux Gaming

skids Re:Breaking old cards (159 comments)

Same story here. It's one thing to retir support for older discrete cards out of the proprietary driver. Users of those cards tend to upgrade pretty frequently anyway. It's another thing entirely to retire support for embedded laptop chipsets, and while doing that, apparently not give the OpenSource maintainers good enough documentation on the power management/clocking in those chipsets to prevent overheats/instability.

I'm due for a new laptop here at work. My top requirement was "not AMD."

about two weeks ago
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The Importance of Deleting Old Stuff

skids Re:Dear Nazis (177 comments)

In some countries keeping data, especially customer data, longer then needed can cause legal problems as well.

Just about anywhere where a discovery motion can compell you to spend your own staff's time and effort answering questions about whether or not you have data X and please give data X to the lawyers, you want a data retention policy so that when you get that letter, you can just say "it's our policy to delete stuff older than Y, so X is long gone." Otherwise your techs are fumbling around in desk drawers and tape archives for old backups so you can say "yep, we looked."

about two weeks ago
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Anthropomorphism and Object Oriented Programming

skids Re:Programming languages are not really "language" (303 comments)

What gets me is this:

If you don't draw analogies (like anthropomorphism), or abstractions, how the hell do you choose your names in a way that lends itself to understandable code? The author should take his own argument one step further and realize that calling a string of bits a "student" is likewise anthropomorphising the data, and calling another memloc a "Classroom" is applying an anology to what is really going on. Then he could reduce is argument ad-absurdium to requiring that all identifiers be randomly chosenstring to avoid installing unintentional meaning into data structures and procedures/functions.

about three weeks ago
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How We'll Program 1000 Cores - and Get Linus Ranting, Again

skids Re:Torvalds is half right (449 comments)

Also the future typical user will be using more speech recognition, computer vision, and "AI" experts, all of which scale with parallelism.

about three weeks ago
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How We'll Program 1000 Cores - and Get Linus Ranting, Again

skids Re:Torvalds is half right (449 comments)

FP has been rejected by programmers far too long, but the simple mechanism of immutability removes that most bothersome of bugs

...and kills you rmemory/cache profile. FP is great for a subset of problems, but should not be held up on a pedestal, just appreciaed as one tool in the box.

FP should already be easier to reason about than procedural programming

Considering it makes many everyday things harder to express, the fact that FP lends itself to easy modeling is offloading the mental effort in the wrong place. You're buying academic ease of manipulation at te expense of increasing the drudgery of everyday tasks, which is why FP is favored for research but not generally accepted for application.

about three weeks ago
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Glowing Hobbit Sword Helps You Find Unsecured Wi-Fi

skids Wouldn't that wear out the battery pretty fast? (67 comments)

This thing would never go out. I mean, is there pretty much anywhere you can stand that doesn't have at least an HP printer ad-hoccing away?

about a month ago
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NetworkManager 1.0 Released After Ten Years Development

skids Re:mask NM (164 comments)

Yes, it has been easier in general to move out of the way than some of the other desktop junk. Some of the automated editing of config files was annoying but at least how to kick it off an interface was easy to find and no other applications were so tangled up with it that they got cranky without it running, unlike avahi which always causes error message spew everywhere when it is down and over the years has been a game of whack-a-mole to keep it killed what with all the different ways it got started.

In general other than the smurfword name and the fact that I'm always elbow deep in network stuff and cannot have it interfering I think it's been a net positive to have around.

I wonder if it will make a push towards becoming an 11u cred manager. We do need a good UI for that if the rank and file users are ever to use 11u for something other than letting providers find ways to monetize their use of hotspots.

about a month ago
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NetworkManager 1.0 Released After Ten Years Development

skids Re:NetworkManager (164 comments)

My best guess as to why they would mess with that is they wanted to fix a few issues where the standalone DHCP clients were not re-negotiating when they needed to, and of course they wanted to do it over DBUS. The alternative fix would have been to work with DHCP client projects/maintainers to add pluggable DBUS control interfaces to those, but when given the choice between that and mission creep, mission creep wins these days. Unless they just decided to use the systemd DHCP client they put in there for use booting containers, and that is what is being referred to.

The other hard components to wrangle are pptpd/pppd/l2tpd (convincing them to hang up when they should, and getting them to promptly relinquish their device node so rules written against ppp0 don't have to be yanked back out and reinstalled when it changes to ppp1 after a tunnel rebuilds.) I wonder how long until they roll their own of those instead of helping improve them.

about a month ago
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Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

skids Re:Sure... (343 comments)

People just cannot resist the ease of communication. Email is the crack cocaine of IT security.

I've always maintained the most devastating payload a worm could have would be forwarding random things from sent-mail to random receipients in the contacts list, considering how so many lead incredibly dishonest lives.

about a month ago
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Cause and Effect: How a Revolutionary New Statistical Test Can Tease Them Apart

skids Re:I predict (137 comments)

I'm hazy on the details but ISTR sports deriving from wardances which dervied from a desire not to have all your warriors killed just to figure out who got to use the better stream for the following month.

about a month ago
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Cause and Effect: How a Revolutionary New Statistical Test Can Tease Them Apart

skids Re:Lies, damned lies, and statistics (137 comments)

Almost any level of accuracy above pure randomness can be fruitfully added to the bayesion inference process. You can pretty harmlessly add the pure noise as well, it's just not going to be fruitful.

about a month ago
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Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

skids Re:Stupid (396 comments)

no MITM injection required

You say that like MITM is harder than setting up a server and socially engineering people to it. It isn't these days.

about a month ago
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Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

skids Re:Stupid (396 comments)

Since many people browse from poorly secured wifi segments, it can happen more than you might think. Also, since a large proportion of wired networks do not have their first-hop-security features turned on (and can't in the case of ipV6 because they lack the features) opportunities are readily available.

about a month ago

Submissions

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MA "Right To Repair" initiative still on Tuesday ballot, may override compromise

skids skids writes  |  more than 2 years ago

skids (119237) writes "MA voters face a complex technical and economic question Tuesday about just how open automobile makers should be with their repair and diagnostic interfaces. A legislative compromise struck in July may not be strong enough for consumer's tastes. Proponents of the measure had joined opponents in asking voters to skip the question once the legislature, seeking to avoid legislation by ballot, struck the deal. Weeks before the election they have reversed course and are again urging voters to pass the measure. Now voters have to decide whether the differences between the ballot language and the new law are too hard on manufacturers, or essential consumer protections. At stake is a mandated standard for diagnostic channels in a significant market."
Link to Original Source
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House Panel Approves Bill Forcing ISPs Log Users

skids skids writes  |  more than 3 years ago

skids (119237) writes "Under the guise of fighting child pornography, the House Judiciary Committee approved legislation on Thursday that would require Internet service providers (ISPs) to collect and retain records about Internet users’ activity. The 19 to 10 vote represents a victory for conservative Republicans, who made data retention their first major technology initiative after last fall's elections. A last-minute rewrite of the bill expands the information that commercial Internet providers are required to store to include customers' names, addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, and temporarily-assigned IP addresses. Per dissenting Rep. John Conyers (D-MI): 'The bill is mislabeled ... This is not protecting children from Internet pornography. It's creating a database for everybody in this country for a lot of other purposes.'"
Link to Original Source
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CIA drones may have used illegal, inaccurate code

skids skids writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "Coders hate having to rush code out the door before it's ready. They also hate it when the customer starts making unreasonable demands. What they hate even more is when the customer reverse engineers the product and starts selling their own inferior product. But what really ticks them off is when that buggy knockoff product might be used to target military unmanned drone attacks, and the bugs introduce errors up to 13 meters. That's what purportedly happened to software developer IISi based on an ongoing boardroom/courtroom drama that will leave any hard-pressed coder appreciating just how much worse their job could get. The saddest part? The CIA assumed the bug was a feature. The tinfoil-hat-inducing part? The alleged perpetrators just got bought by IBM."
Link to Original Source
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Hacking Big Brother with help from Revlon

skids skids writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "All those futuristic full-face eyeliner jobs in distopian cyberpunk fiction might not be that far off the mark. A New York University student spent his thesis time exploring computer vision technology (OpenCV) for ways in which one could confound first-stage algorithms that initially lock onto faces. Then he mixed in a bit of fashion sense to predict future geek chic. Now, whether you want to go for the coal-miner look just to stay out of the data mine, that's up to you..."
Link to Original Source
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Digital Photocopiers Loaded With Secrets

skids skids writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "File this under "no, really?" CBS news catches up with the fact that photocopiers, whether networked or not, tend to have a much longer memory these days. When they eventually get tossed, very few companies bother to scrub them. Coupled with the tendency of older employees to consider hard-copy to be "secure", and your most protected secrets may be shipped directly to information resellers — no hacking required. "The day we visited the New Jersey warehouse, two shipping containers packed with used copiers were headed overseas — loaded with secrets on their way to unknown buyers in Argentina and Singapore.""
Link to Original Source

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