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Single Pixel Camera Takes Images Through Breast Tissue

skids Re:Single-pixel what? (51 comments)

Shoot a randomly speckled light pattern through a splitter. Put one copy of the pattern into a multipixel camera, then multiply what the multpixel camera saw with what the single pixel receiver saw after the second copy of the pattern bounced off or through the target. Rinse repeat, sum that array of pixels over lots of iterations. Basically that tweaked with additional statistics and physics for efficiency/accuracy. Perhaps eliminate the multipixel camera if you can find some other way to know the speckle patterns you emit.

Still not clear on how they get the duplicate of the post-scattering image when using a chicken breast as a scatterer, myself, though. Maybe they are acattering before the chicken breast and just have found additional math to compensate for the scattering in the chicken.

7 hours ago
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Single Pixel Camera Takes Images Through Breast Tissue

skids Re:Turn it around. (51 comments)

You're thinking too small. Used on lottery scratch tickets it would provide resources to then buy boobies and a beer to boot.

7 hours ago
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Debian Forked Over Systemd

skids Re:What's the name again? (356 comments)

They are telling English speakers to pronounce it "DevOne" because that's how it is pronounced in italian. Because they know English speakers tend to suffer from ethnocentrism and reading comprehension problems.

10 hours ago
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Debian Forked Over Systemd

skids Re:It won't go anywhere (356 comments)

It does half of what Jack does, and a few desktop-related things Jack doesn't yet, and saps developer talent away from Jack, preventing Jack from maturing into something beyond an audiophile server, as far as I can tell. Also it further inflicts INI-style config files on anyone unfortunate enough to have to mess with its innards. (Behold the mess in /usr/share/pulseaudio/ and it's poorly commented contorted structure)

10 hours ago
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Debian Forked Over Systemd

skids Re:Wow... (356 comments)

Then why aren't you hearing anything from the Red Hat customer base?

I am. Were I to walk into the systems suite here at work and yell "yeah centos 7!" I would probably be bombarded with nerf darts. In a mean way.

10 hours ago
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Scientists Develop "Paint" To Help Cool the Planet

skids Re:In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamic (140 comments)

"Ambient" is important to define here. The temperature of the air is not actually playing much of a role in the black body equation. If the sky was made of more buildings at ambient temperature, then the story would be different, but other than the sun it's mostly an open pit into which anything radiated never returns. Also keep in mind that that figure may be referencing the temperature of the air near the whole building including the lower floors; it is cooler up high on tall buildings.

The idea is that the heat provided from within the building and the heat from the 3% of sunlight that gets through the mirror all pools and the mirror material then converts it to a specific passband. So you have more heat pooling than what comes in on that passband.

How effective this system remains when contaminated with a coat of dust is a question. Also comparative advantage to absorbing the heat/light and using it to power AC.

yesterday
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Firefox Will Soon Offer One-Click Buttons For Your Search Engines

skids Re:Ah, good, progress. (101 comments)

Funny, the presence of that search box is the only reason I still prefer firefox over Chrome or Opera.

Being able to cache a search term in that box and still alter URLs and then go back to my pre-typed search term and mod it and then use it to replace a tab's contents is indispensible.

3 days ago
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Firefox Signs Five-Year Deal With Yahoo, Drops Google as Default Search Engine

skids Re:Who gives more funding? (397 comments)

I still use Firefox for any "real browsing" because the others don't have a separate search box without adding an extension, an extension which eventually breaks or robs you of another 5 minutes of your time when you have to start fresh on a new system. Having that extra box hanging around so you can modify search terms while still having a url bar to type in is just too essential when actually doing serious research on the web.

But for performance and thorough feature support I sometimes have to use chrome. Luckily you can still disable the annoying omnibar search by defining a null "search engine" which just browses https://s/ and clicking a few options to limit the amount of stuff that can appear in the evil focus-grabbing dropdown menu. So for 1 minute of customization time you can get chrome to the point where it's half as useful as firefox for browsing and it doesn't hose your CPU under linux like firefox.

about two weeks ago
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Military Laser/Radio Tech Proposed As Alternative To Laying Costly Fiber Cable

skids Re:Yes, it could be much cheaper (150 comments)

I do hope to see this downsized to an individual level that can help bring ad hoc mesh networks a little closer to being

TFA is about a refinement to tech that's existed for quite some decades now -- I remember pricing out dual FSO/microwave setups way back when. They never really came down into a price range where we could justify deploying them versus leasing telco, even the small ones, and we saw no real motion towards commoditization.

about two weeks ago
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Scientists Optimistic About Getting a Mammoth Genome Complete Enough To Clone

skids Re:huh? (187 comments)

The cloning could go horribly wrong yielding birth defects, or the animal could endure a lifetime of suffering due to factors like (spitballing here) not having compatible intestinal flora.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Unblock Email From My Comcast-Hosted Server?

skids Re:Call Comcast? (405 comments)

You should start the business-account ticket process anyway. You might even convince them to proactively approach these services from their side. Defending the ability of one's assigned blocks to send email is one of the jobs of any address holder, even if Comcast doesn't care about how badly their residential customers are treated (by others as well as their own techs) they should care about business address ranges.

You could try demanding different addresses as well.

about two weeks ago
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Your Incompetent Boss Is Making You Unhappy

skids Re:No shit, (204 comments)

Yes, it did. Because quite regularly, those things that "everybody knows" turn out to be not actually true.

This is evident since people seem to "just know" things that are easily disprovable, not just hard to prove subject matter that requires a research paper.

A google of phrases like "most people think" can make for some fun afternoon reading.

about two weeks ago
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Crowd-Sourced Experiment To Map All Human Skills

skids Re:Nice try but ... (70 comments)

I'd make a similar complaint, but the objective of this project is obviously just to harvest a base of credentials. It's such a bad idea on the surface when they could just mine wikipedia, that I don;t believe for a second they are serious about the product.

about two weeks ago
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GNOME Project Seeks Donations For Trademark Battle With Groupon

skids Re:Why feed the lawyers? (268 comments)

Heh. I see what you did there.

In all seriousness, were GNOME-the-desktop to have some major security incident and it affects the viability of GNOME-the-PoS with potential customers by associating the brand with security problems in search engine results, someone will start to appreciate the merit of avoiding name collisions.

about two weeks ago
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Informational Wi-Fi Traffic As a Covert Communication Channel For Malware

skids Re:Requires Infected Computer. Nothing new. (16 comments)

Neither are interframe arrival times on just about any traffic monitored, and one could easily encode a cnc to look at stat counters on the interfaces.

So really this is in the area of "horse already left the barn."

about three weeks ago
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Ebola Nose Spray Vaccine Protects Monkeys

skids Re:Of course (198 comments)

Those academic scientists at (insert school) and their money grubbing ways, always asking for a handout, feeding off the public trough.

about three weeks ago
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NSA Director Says Agency Shares Most, But Not All, Bugs It Finds

skids Re:Number is irrelevant compared to severity (170 comments)

A vulnerability that requires standing on one leg while juggling two white cats and wearing a clown nose is something they can keep to themselves, because it's so unlikely that anyone else will stumble across it.

...and they have an ample supply of cats and clown noses.

about three weeks ago
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New Atomic Clock Reaches the Boundaries of Timekeeping

skids Re: Old saying (249 comments)

This argument is as spurious as the frames of reference and definitions needed to support it are extreme. Also the orginal post didn't say there were no flaws with "simultaneity", just that calling it "wrong" was "wrong." It's well known that any causal relationship is preserved from any frame of reference, and furthermore "events" on the macro scale don't happen at a discrete moment in time. If you have a balloon with a chipmunk suspended inside it, and you release the chipmunk so it falls and pops the balloon, it can be said with perfect accuracy that the baloon popped simultaneuously with the chipmunk falling, assuming the balloon was not on a table and the chipmunk continued to fall past the edge of the balloon.

The arguments against "simultaneity" require the precise scientific definition of the term, which should be confined to academic papers.

Do not try the above experiment at home.

The general gist of the matter is it would be technically possible to "synchronize" these clocks in the sense that with enough external data to accurately determine the frames of reference involved, we could know the time on one of the clocks as observed by an individual next to that clock from the value of another a clock next to us, even if that individual could never tell us the time on the clock because by the time any communication reached us, it would be stale. This despite the fact that the clocks are actually running at different rates on most frames of reference, not just different offsets. If that was done bilaterally, and both calculations yielded each other's input value, both parties could agree that, in retrospect, they read the clocks at the same "time".

An external observer to both clocks might see the readings happen at different times, but if they have any intellect they have to account for their perspective not being the only valid one.

It would also be possible to construct an average aggregate clock out of a group of these, the question is merely the utility of such a clock, since instead of a "timezone" you'd have a "framezone" where you'd have both an offset and an ongoing drift, not to mention the parameters of that adjustment would not be constant because phenomina like shifting planetary crust don't play nice.

We would not be able to measure the speed of light without such systems, so they obviously play an important role.

about three weeks ago
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New Atomic Clock Reaches the Boundaries of Timekeeping

skids Re: Old saying (249 comments)

It is not just a matter of clocks, but that observers at different speeds will have a difference sense of when things they see happen at the same versus different times.

This assumes the observer is not capable of measuring the velocity to the observed system and compensating for it. Given enough data, the two observers at different velocities could calculate what time each of the two events would have occured at if at the exact time of the event the system the two observers magically teleported to the same location. The problems are agreeing on a mutual standardized location/frame and acquiring said data. You can construct systems where the former is difficult, but there are far more simple applications where it is not difficult to do so. The latter may indeed be very difficult.

about three weeks ago
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US Midterm Elections Discussion

skids Re:News For Nerds? (401 comments)

Maybe I'm up too late, but this post makes no sense to me whatseoever. It's the usual "major parties both suck" substance-free mantra that gets mod points, followed by some sort of assertion that people who vote for major party candidates believe cops will know how they voted and retaliate (clue: people who believe that vote libertarian. Or well some of them probably vote for extremist parties as well.) There are reaons people vote for major parties. They may not be right or even strategic reasons, but they are not some ridiclous fear of institutional retaliation. Were they, we would not have so many registered independents.

about a month ago

Submissions

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MA "Right To Repair" initiative still on Tuesday ballot, may override compromise

skids skids writes  |  about 2 years ago

skids (119237) writes "MA voters face a complex technical and economic question Tuesday about just how open automobile makers should be with their repair and diagnostic interfaces. A legislative compromise struck in July may not be strong enough for consumer's tastes. Proponents of the measure had joined opponents in asking voters to skip the question once the legislature, seeking to avoid legislation by ballot, struck the deal. Weeks before the election they have reversed course and are again urging voters to pass the measure. Now voters have to decide whether the differences between the ballot language and the new law are too hard on manufacturers, or essential consumer protections. At stake is a mandated standard for diagnostic channels in a significant market."
Link to Original Source
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House Panel Approves Bill Forcing ISPs Log Users

skids skids writes  |  more than 2 years ago

skids (119237) writes "Under the guise of fighting child pornography, the House Judiciary Committee approved legislation on Thursday that would require Internet service providers (ISPs) to collect and retain records about Internet users’ activity. The 19 to 10 vote represents a victory for conservative Republicans, who made data retention their first major technology initiative after last fall's elections. A last-minute rewrite of the bill expands the information that commercial Internet providers are required to store to include customers' names, addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, and temporarily-assigned IP addresses. Per dissenting Rep. John Conyers (D-MI): 'The bill is mislabeled ... This is not protecting children from Internet pornography. It's creating a database for everybody in this country for a lot of other purposes.'"
Link to Original Source
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CIA drones may have used illegal, inaccurate code

skids skids writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "Coders hate having to rush code out the door before it's ready. They also hate it when the customer starts making unreasonable demands. What they hate even more is when the customer reverse engineers the product and starts selling their own inferior product. But what really ticks them off is when that buggy knockoff product might be used to target military unmanned drone attacks, and the bugs introduce errors up to 13 meters. That's what purportedly happened to software developer IISi based on an ongoing boardroom/courtroom drama that will leave any hard-pressed coder appreciating just how much worse their job could get. The saddest part? The CIA assumed the bug was a feature. The tinfoil-hat-inducing part? The alleged perpetrators just got bought by IBM."
Link to Original Source
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Hacking Big Brother with help from Revlon

skids skids writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "All those futuristic full-face eyeliner jobs in distopian cyberpunk fiction might not be that far off the mark. A New York University student spent his thesis time exploring computer vision technology (OpenCV) for ways in which one could confound first-stage algorithms that initially lock onto faces. Then he mixed in a bit of fashion sense to predict future geek chic. Now, whether you want to go for the coal-miner look just to stay out of the data mine, that's up to you..."
Link to Original Source
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Digital Photocopiers Loaded With Secrets

skids skids writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "File this under "no, really?" CBS news catches up with the fact that photocopiers, whether networked or not, tend to have a much longer memory these days. When they eventually get tossed, very few companies bother to scrub them. Coupled with the tendency of older employees to consider hard-copy to be "secure", and your most protected secrets may be shipped directly to information resellers — no hacking required. "The day we visited the New Jersey warehouse, two shipping containers packed with used copiers were headed overseas — loaded with secrets on their way to unknown buyers in Argentina and Singapore.""
Link to Original Source

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