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Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

skids Re: Overly broad? (307 comments)

Maybe slashdot posters are all the prejudiced stereotypes you have in your mind, or maybe they just are frustrated with constantly reading about studies being invalidated by other later studies, with further salt rubbed in the wounds by pooor science journalism on top of that (like headlining an article about sugared soda as if it applied to all soda when diet soda accounts for over 25% of soda sales.) and perhaps they remember this article avocating larger sample sizes and more sound statitsical treatment in such studies.

7 hours ago
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Mixing Agile With Waterfall For Code Quality

skids Re:Agile is the answer to everything (132 comments)

authorities on developmental and coding methodologies are a dime a dozen

I thought people who sat around opining about the code they expect other people to actually write were somehow paradoxically payed much better than that.

2 days ago
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Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

skids Re:Oh great (545 comments)

Because gen mobile needs to be able to type it on their crummy laggy error-prone on-screen touch keypads, preferably without ever shifting keypad state.

about a week ago
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Samsung's Wi-Fi Upgrades Promise Speeds Up to 4.6Gbps

skids Re:And this being samsung... (92 comments)

And when they do release an update, it will break something more important, and there will be no way to use the user interface to downgrade.

about a week ago
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Samsung's Wi-Fi Upgrades Promise Speeds Up to 4.6Gbps

skids Re:Disinformation (92 comments)

Similar experience. There were updates for my SmartTV but only for bullsit. Similar to how Sony only ever updates to PS Store and never fixes anything important that is broken.

about a week ago
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Independent Researchers Test Rossi's Alleged Cold Fusion Device For 32 Days

skids Re:Hoax (972 comments)

you know that the central process of most power generation involves "just creating heat", right?

Actually it isn't "just creating heat" it's creating a temperature gradient suitable for efficient conversion of heat flux to work, since the efficiency of that conversion is limited by the second law of thermodynamics.

about a week ago
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Independent Researchers Test Rossi's Alleged Cold Fusion Device For 32 Days

skids Re:Hoax (972 comments)

Without weighing in on TFA or any of the other subject matter, or even the economics of nickel isotopes since I have no clue, materials that have little current use can and do cost more than they would were there reason to produce them, so to make that statement one must assess the projected cost of large scale production.

about a week ago
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The Greatest Keyboard Ever Made

skids Re:Unicomp (304 comments)

Yep as the TFA states:

But fans say the springs' resistance and their audible "click" make it clear when a keypress is registered, reducing errors

However, with modern software's 7 layer abstraction burrito and race conditions up the wazzu, that's only half the battle.

about two weeks ago
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Lennart Poettering: Open Source Community "Quite a Sick Place To Be In"

skids Re: In which country? (993 comments)

What I meant is that some people do it in Europe. Here in the U.S. I've seen someone other than me do it about a grand total of once.

about two weeks ago
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Lennart Poettering: Open Source Community "Quite a Sick Place To Be In"

skids Re:In which country? (993 comments)

We do better than that in MA. Our left lane law was actually apparently written before multilane highways and never adapted. It's technically even illegal to take a left exit here (never enforced) and to use the middle lane unless passing.

There's a common code that many states to defer that gets it about right, unlike the "passing only" states: you have to be going the average speed of traffic to use the left lane, should pull over if safe to let people pass, and generally shouldn't use the left lane unless there's too much congestion for everyone to drive in the right lane. with exceptions for left exits and preemptive passing positions when going by entrance ramps.

In Europe they put on their blinker towards the median side rather than obnoxiously flashing their high beams to remind people in front to vacate the fast lane. Very civilized. This also lets the driver behind you know you'd pass the guy if you could.

about two weeks ago
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Why the FCC Will Probably Ignore the Public On Network Neutrality

skids Re:Changes require systematic, reliable evidence.. (336 comments)

This is pretty much the way I see it, working in the field. On the "pro-net-neutrality" side there are those with reasonable views on balancing common carriage with legitimate needs for priority, some with a basic level of network literacy with a wide range of conflicting specific suggestions who don't usually understand the consequences of what they are asking for, and a whole lot of people who don't even understand what it is they are asking for and prefer to converse in vague terms and catch phrases. I doubt there are even 3 million Americans who know what "statistical multiplexing" means so how are they supposed to weigh in on the issue.

Being a progressive my peers are generally surprised when I answer :"it depends" when asked whether I support "net neutrality" rather than "yes."

about two weeks ago
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Linux 3.17 Kernel Released With Xbox One Controller Support

skids Re:Please explain (114 comments)

It doesn't, you can load it as a module.

...or run the alternative userspace driver, which linux supports doing as well.

What really should be the question is why can't even Microsoft, which despite their software reputation generally is well reguarded for input accessories, not present a consistent interface across different generations of controllers. It's not like there isn't an enumeration standard they could follow.

about two weeks ago
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Marriott Fined $600,000 For Jamming Guest Hotspots

skids Re:So, if not the FCC, who should regulate it? (278 comments)

Now... what happens when a Hotel guest brings in a portable device [theverge.com] and starts shutting down the official Cameras, Printers, and Wireless APs?

Well, if the Microsoft would fix the damn surface so MFP doesn't break it and operators have to disable MFP, and the hotel sets things up right, nothing, just a bit of congestion.

What happens when conventioneers start using MFP? That's the real fun, there.

about two weeks ago
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Marriott Fined $600,000 For Jamming Guest Hotspots

skids Re:Jamming unlinced spectrum is illegal? (278 comments)

I used to work in the IT department at a university and we did EXACTLY the same thing that Mariott was doing,

I work in a university IT department and we never go near those vendor features because of legal concerns. I don't know how the vendors get away with offering them.

about two weeks ago
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Marriott Fined $600,000 For Jamming Guest Hotspots

skids Re:Now if they could only fix... (278 comments)

I have thousands of hosts on the same L2 network over WiFi. Works fine. Just turn off broadcast/multicast, use proxy ARP, and pinhole/convert the bare essential multicasts/broadcasts to unicast. RF is indeed a big problem with density, which is why stadium setups use directional antenna arrays, but the biggest problem is consumer-grade wifi drivers that lose their s**t if they see too many APs, die horribly in the face of modern roaming assist standards, and if they are even lucky to have a 5GHZ antenna to drive, can't do DFS channels right.

about two weeks ago
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MIT Study Outlines a 'Perfect' Solar Cell

skids Re:perfect? (110 comments)

Actually thermophotovoltaics, like stirling engine collectors, have the advantage that you can use them as a an electricity generator from natural gas at night instead of using a dedicated natural gas plant. Not sure if TFA is a technology that enables that use case, but it has been looked at as a way to combine the installation costs of solar arrays and natgas plants. Also there's been speculation as to whether they can be made into a more efficient way for hybrid cars to burn gas than an ICE.

TFA, though seems like it is more focused on photo-thermo-photovoltaics. No pun intended.

about two weeks ago
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Elon Musk: We Must Put a Million People On Mars To Safeguard Humanity

skids Re:Profitable, if self-contradictory (549 comments)

It's actually pretty simple logic:

Either A) there will be an unavoidable "heat death" which no race may survive or B) Some undiscovered aspect of the universe will prevent A)
and Either C) we get off this rock or D) we stay on this rock.

A and C -- we are doomed
A and D -- we are doomed
B and D -- we are doomed
B and C -- chance of survival.

about three weeks ago
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Linux Foundation Announces Major Network Functions Virtualization Project

skids Re:Businessese Bingo (40 comments)

No this is more reasonable than SDN. SDN pretends to be a road to virtualizing the capabilities of actual grunt-work networking equipment, without being arsed to actually be able to enumerate said capabilities and thus is doomed to never fully succeed. This, however, is for the higher level intelligence well suited to virtualization -- basically the stuff thateats all your RSPs' CPU.

about three weeks ago
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The Great Lightbulb Conspiracy

skids Re:"the Phoebus cartel still casts a shadow today" (602 comments)

Wiring LEDS in series for use with a household voltage makes sense, (as long as you can precisely batch-match the LEDs.) Then you don't have to step down the voltage as much so you can use less expensive and failure-prone electronics and achieve higher efficiency.

That said, given the progress of increasing LED efficiency, it might not be such a bad thing if the early models didn't last so long, because they last so long that by the time they are replaced, they may have burned off more electricity relative to an earlier replacement than the cost of that replacement.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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MA "Right To Repair" initiative still on Tuesday ballot, may override compromise

skids skids writes  |  about 2 years ago

skids (119237) writes "MA voters face a complex technical and economic question Tuesday about just how open automobile makers should be with their repair and diagnostic interfaces. A legislative compromise struck in July may not be strong enough for consumer's tastes. Proponents of the measure had joined opponents in asking voters to skip the question once the legislature, seeking to avoid legislation by ballot, struck the deal. Weeks before the election they have reversed course and are again urging voters to pass the measure. Now voters have to decide whether the differences between the ballot language and the new law are too hard on manufacturers, or essential consumer protections. At stake is a mandated standard for diagnostic channels in a significant market."
Link to Original Source
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House Panel Approves Bill Forcing ISPs Log Users

skids skids writes  |  more than 3 years ago

skids (119237) writes "Under the guise of fighting child pornography, the House Judiciary Committee approved legislation on Thursday that would require Internet service providers (ISPs) to collect and retain records about Internet users’ activity. The 19 to 10 vote represents a victory for conservative Republicans, who made data retention their first major technology initiative after last fall's elections. A last-minute rewrite of the bill expands the information that commercial Internet providers are required to store to include customers' names, addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, and temporarily-assigned IP addresses. Per dissenting Rep. John Conyers (D-MI): 'The bill is mislabeled ... This is not protecting children from Internet pornography. It's creating a database for everybody in this country for a lot of other purposes.'"
Link to Original Source
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CIA drones may have used illegal, inaccurate code

skids skids writes  |  about 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "Coders hate having to rush code out the door before it's ready. They also hate it when the customer starts making unreasonable demands. What they hate even more is when the customer reverse engineers the product and starts selling their own inferior product. But what really ticks them off is when that buggy knockoff product might be used to target military unmanned drone attacks, and the bugs introduce errors up to 13 meters. That's what purportedly happened to software developer IISi based on an ongoing boardroom/courtroom drama that will leave any hard-pressed coder appreciating just how much worse their job could get. The saddest part? The CIA assumed the bug was a feature. The tinfoil-hat-inducing part? The alleged perpetrators just got bought by IBM."
Link to Original Source
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Hacking Big Brother with help from Revlon

skids skids writes  |  more than 4 years ago

skids (119237) writes "All those futuristic full-face eyeliner jobs in distopian cyberpunk fiction might not be that far off the mark. A New York University student spent his thesis time exploring computer vision technology (OpenCV) for ways in which one could confound first-stage algorithms that initially lock onto faces. Then he mixed in a bit of fashion sense to predict future geek chic. Now, whether you want to go for the coal-miner look just to stay out of the data mine, that's up to you..."
Link to Original Source
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Digital Photocopiers Loaded With Secrets

skids skids writes  |  more than 3 years ago

skids (119237) writes "File this under "no, really?" CBS news catches up with the fact that photocopiers, whether networked or not, tend to have a much longer memory these days. When they eventually get tossed, very few companies bother to scrub them. Coupled with the tendency of older employees to consider hard-copy to be "secure", and your most protected secrets may be shipped directly to information resellers — no hacking required. "The day we visited the New Jersey warehouse, two shipping containers packed with used copiers were headed overseas — loaded with secrets on their way to unknown buyers in Argentina and Singapore.""
Link to Original Source

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